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Thread: Drone brood

  1. #1
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    A large amount of almost fully developed drone brood is layin on the landing board. This particular hive is full of honey and I need to extract the extra super on top. Figure the bees needed the extra space and have not seen my bees dragging out any mature drones yet.
    "Younz" have a great day, I will.

  2. #2
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    I've found some drone pupae out front of some hives, it pretty much coincided with the bees throwing out the adult drones. I think dumping drone brood this time of year is normal, but I'm surprised your bees haven't tossed the drones out yet.

    George-
    Dulcius ex asperis

  3. #3
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    George, I just had a new queen emerge in my observaion hive on Sunday Sept. 25th (yesterday) and now there are drones in the o. hive when there were none before she emerged--don't know but figure they must be able to smell the virgin queen. Today is the first day I noticed some capped honey in the o. hive also. Lots and lots of information for me to learn yet. Looks like thursday of this week may have a frost here.
    "Younz" have a great day, I will.

  4. #4
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    The balance of drones in a hive is something that facinates me. Why, when, and how many they raise is very interesting bee beehavior. Is your new queen a supercedure queen? The old queen must have anticipated the need for drones..

    We have yet to frost, but it won't be long. Good luck PN.

    George-
    Dulcius ex asperis

  5. #5
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    Pretty normal this time of year. They suddenly decide it's too late in the year to feed them all and they haul them out.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #6
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    George, the o hive swarmed and I ended up with only one queen cell on the bottom of the second frame down. The hive was so full of bees and the golden rod was producing so heavily that the bees swarmed. I put the swarm into a medium box with small cell foundation and a boardman feeder (did not have any drawn comb left) and now they have three quarters of the frames drawn and working like crazy to get stores for winter. I will place a full medium super of golden rod honey on top for them to get through winter.Could hardly believe that they swarmed that late in the season.
    "Younz" have a great day, I will.

  7. #7
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    Power Napper,
    See if you agree with these "Facts":
    1. Goldenrod honey crystalizes quickly and may be a factor in winter killing a hive.
    2 Sugar is .25 a pound.
    3 Honey has a retail value of $5.00 a pound.
    4. there is still time to feed up a super of syrup.
    5 Syrup is superior winter feed.


    You do the math.

    Dickm

  8. #8
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    Maybe I'm missing some sarcasm somewhere. I appreciate the quotation marks around "facts".

    >1. Goldenrod honey crystalizes quickly

    Yes.

    > and may be a factor in winter killing a hive.

    There are those who believe that. I don't think so.

    >2 Sugar is .25 a pound.
    http://www.grocerydirect.net/pc-529-...ane-sugar.aspx

    This is $1.67 a pound. I'm sure I can beat that, but not $0.25 a pound. You can find it at that?

    >3 Honey has a retail value of $5.00 a pound.

    Again, should I assume this is sarcasm? Maybe in a nice package in the comb. Are you getting $5 a pound?

    >4. there is still time to feed up a super of syrup.

    Probably.

    >5. Syrup is superior winter feed.

    There are those of that opinion. I'm not one of them.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  9. #9
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    >>2 Sugar is .25 a pound.
    >>This is $1.67 a pound. I'm sure I can beat that, but not $0.25 a pound. You can find it at that?

    I can't find it at $0.25/lb but I pay $0.345/lb when I buy it in 4lb bags. I prefer 10 or 25lb bags but it costs more per pound to do it that way.

    My guess is that that website is showing a 4lb bag and mistakenly put 1lb. (or they are just ripping people off) That would come to $0.4175/lb which is much more in line.

    >>>3 Honey has a retail value of $5.00 a pound.

    Not around here. I've had people balk at $4/lb. I sell a gal for $30 and people prefer to buy it that way (2.50/lb). I get the point however. The economics are there to buy sugar and sell honey.

    Dan
    Dan Williamson
    B&C Honey Farm http://www.flickr.com/photos/9848229@N05/

  10. #10
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    Go back to the site and click on "other pruducts." I have never seen prices that high. They must be including shipping, or they are total rip-offs. Sugar here is $8.?? for 25 lb.
    Honey sells for $3.00 or less per lb.
    Honey can be harvested in the spring if its not consumed .
    The cluster is approx. 90 degrees F., enough to liquefy the honey as they move up.

  11. #11
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    I buy my sugar at Costco in 50# bags at $16.39 whuch works out to just under .34 a pound. I believe it just went up to that. I need to be punished.
    I sell my honey for $6.00 a pound in a nice jar.
    I've looked at a lot of deadouts with crystalized honey sitting in the mess.
    I think the bees need more than temperature to reliquify the crystals. I'm not certain why I think so but you will agree that it must take more energy.
    It's commomly accepted that low residue in the winter feed is important when bees can't fly for weeks on end. Nothing has lower residue than sugar syrup.
    I was just trying to make a point, gee whiz! Those who know me are certain I am a sarcastic ...insert expletetive. I thought I left it out of this post.


    Dickm

  12. #12
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    I bought a 400 pound barrel of sugar for $100 from a large migratory beekeeper. To pay .25 cents per pound for sugar, you need to be buying tons of it. The "regular" price at Walmart here in Maine is .34 cents per pound, doesn't matter if it's 10 or 25 pound bags.

    George-
    Dulcius ex asperis

  13. #13
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    If I were in the business of producing as much honey as possible, I would consider harvesting every last drop of honey and feeding sugar for winter. I know there are people who do just that.

    I know a guy who still harvests all the honey, lets the bees die and buys packages in the spring. I think I paid about $65 last time I bought packages, although I'm sure it's going up. If you figure you can harvest an extra 80 to 100 pounds of honey and not have to buy sugar, you probably come out a bit ahead to sacrifice the bees -- a lot ahead if you can sell the honey retail.

    But I don't want to sacrifice bees. It doesn't seem right.
    Linux - World domination through world cooperation

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