Results 1 to 18 of 18
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Lakeland FL
    Posts
    844

    Post

    hey guys were in the news paper check out HollandSentinel.com we are on the front page the title: Whats The Buzz.







  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    ATL, GA, USA
    Posts
    70

    Post

    That's great- Congratulations !!!

    Pretty good story, you guys are inspiring 12 and 13 yeard old and taking care of 15 hives. Wow !

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,120

    Post

    Cool! It's nice to have a face for the name.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Neodesha, Ks
    Posts
    623

    Post

    Looks like that we have a couple more young Beekeepers amoung us. Congranulations guys.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    oneonta al.
    Posts
    848
    VERY good boy's, hang in there>>>>MARK

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Brunswick, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    185

    Post

    Hey Guys,
    how about posting the article for the rest of us to read. Sounds interesting.
    Walt

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    michigan
    Posts
    393

    Post

    Nice Article Swarm trapper.

    do you belong to the holland area bee club?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,431
    Kudos guys!!

    It's great to see young guys not afraid to work with an enterprising spirit. I commend your parents too.

    -Barry

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Sapulpa,OK USA
    Posts
    174

    Post

    Please post the article and photos for those of us who did not look yesterday.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Lakeland FL
    Posts
    844

    Post

    How can I post it? Wineman we are not part of the holland bee club

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

    Post

    Wow I learned a lot by reading this!

    ;0)

    Sounds like you fella's are having fun.

    Way ta go....

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Lakeland FL
    Posts
    844

    Big Grin

    thanks coyotefor posting that yea we have a ton of fun i think I would go nuts if I cant check tham every week

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    michigan
    Posts
    393

    Post

    Swarm trapper

    My best advice for you in Holland is to make sure they are well protected from the wind for the winter. Closer to the lake you get and the harder it seems to be to winter. The first 3 miles or so off the lake can be brutal.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Neodesha, Ks
    Posts
    623

    Post

    And while you are checking your hives you are not on the street getting into TROUBLE.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,431

    Arrow

    http://www.HollandSentinel.com/stori...82503001.shtml

    ------

    Monday, August 25, 2003

    What's the buzz?
    Young brothers build a business in bee keeping

    By JOHN BURDICK
    Staff writer

    -----------------------------
    - PHOTO -
    KEEPERS: Nick Groenhof, 13, and his brother, Jake Groenhof, 12, of Park Township, check one of the 15 hives they maintain.
    Sentinel/Brian Forde
    -----------------------------

    One could say that Nick and Jake Groenhof have been as busy as bees this summer.

    Nick and Jake are only 13 and 12 years old, respectively, but have established a thriving business that's sweet as honey -- literally.

    The two Park Township boys are beekeepers.

    "It's a lot of fun," said Nick. "It's always different. It's never the same."

    ----------------------------
    - PHOTO -
    HONEY MAKERS: Jake Groenhof, 12, of Park Township, holds a tray of bees making combs, Thursday at a hive they maintain.
    Sentinel/Brian Forde
    ----------------------------

    The brothers have been helping a pollinator who serves their family blueberry farm, Groenhof Farms, for the past couple of years.

    Last year, he gave the boys their own hive.

    Now they have 15 hives at three locations, with 30,000 to 40,000 bees a hive. That's about a half million bees that have produced close to 800 pounds of honey already this year.

    "A lot of hives vary, it depends on the queen," Jake said.

    -----------------------
    - PHOTO -*
    BUSY BEES: (L-R) Nick and Jake Groenhof talk about how the brothers got into handling bees as a hobby.
    Sentinel/Brian Forde
    -----------------------

    Nick and Jake have added more hives by searching their farm and the surrounding countryside for bee swarms. They capture them by setting out boxes with combs in them and then waiting for the bees to come.

    "If the queen gets in, then you know you got them," Jake said.

    "They are loyal to their queen," said their mother, Joy Groenhof.

    Sometimes the boys order queen bees by mail for an existing hive. However, they have to place the queen bee, which comes with her drones, in a special cage at first until she gets to know the existing inhabitants of the hive.

    ---------------
    - PHOTO -*
    BEE BOOKS: Books on the correct way to keep and maintain bees were useful to the Groenhoff brothers.
    Sentinel/Brian Forde
    ---------------

    "If you put a new queen into a hive without a queen, the other bees will kill her usually," Nick said. "There are different breeds of queens, just like there are different breeds of dogs."

    A hive can consist of anywhere from two to more than five boxes stacked together. The boys have seven hives on private property near Ransom Street and 112th Avenue, seven hives on Quincy Street east of U.S. 31 and one at their Riley Street home.

    "It's neat to see them start something like this," their father Jeff Groenhof said. "They keep expanding their business. It's something they enjoy."

    Their mother added, "All they do is talk about bees. There's more to it than I ever imagined."

    The boys, who are home-schooled, say they enjoy the process of making honey. To harvest the honeycomb, they don protective veils, shirts and gloves and shake off the bees. They then use either a hot knife or a honey punch -- a roller with spikes --to cut the wax caps off the combs.

    Next, they put the combs in an extractor and crank it by hand, pulling the honey out of its cells. They heat the honey at temperatures between 110 to 120 degrees and drain it through a strainer to get the wax and pollen out. They then bottle the product, which they sell to friends, relatives, neighbors, people at church and to a local fruit stand.

    The brothers hire their younger siblings, Joe, 10, and Callie, 8, to help them out.

    The boys are used to getting stung.

    "I usually get stung every time I go out there, but usually just once," Nick said. "Some hives are meaner than others. Some are gentle and some produce a lot of honey."

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Lineville Iowa
    Posts
    66
    Way to go guys ,
    its great to see some "younger" beekeepers out there enjoying the craft .
    Zeke

  17. #17
    Jason G in Tennessee Guest

    Post

    Hey, it's nice to see others homeschooling and beekeeping too!
    Jason

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Tulare, CA
    Posts
    66
    Nice to see young people doing something good, and for others to see also. way to go you guys

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