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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
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    ATL, GA, USA
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    70

    Exclamation

    After extracting I took the frames back to the hive to be cleaned. After two days the frames all had honey again and some were almost 2/3 full.

    Brood chamber looks bad: Spotty and mostly empty with dark spots everywhere. I wanted to medicate against shbs, I think they are to blame.

    What to do?
    My bees are being so productive but I know I have to medicate.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    45,445

    Post

    What evidence do you have of Small Hive Beetles? Spotty brood is not a symptom of Small Hive Beetle. Nor is it a symptom of Varroa unless you have very hygenic bees and a bad infestation (kind of contradictory). Spotty brood could be caused by cold (not likely at this time of year) a failing queen, an inbred queen, maybe some minor European Foulbrood. I'd guess if it's very spotty, maybe you need to requeen. Maybe they swarmed and the brood is emerging and just not getting new eggs? Maybe you have a virgin queen? Your symptoms are not very specific. If the hive is producing so well, maybe things are fine? It's true the population keeps increasing for some time after a queen dies or fails, but what exactly are your symptoms of failing?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    ATL, GA, USA
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    70

    Post

    This is when I wish I had a digital camera. I have hive beetles, a horrible brood pattern. Still the hive is full, the bees are pouring out and are filing honey supers pretty fast, they are even filing the ross round super. The bees are also extremely aggresive. I want to requeen. In fact, I want to split and requeen with two new royals, but I want the splits to be clean of hive beetles first and I want to remove the honey supers before as well.

    [This message has been edited by GAbee (edited June 30, 2003).]

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    45,445

    Post

    So you've seen SHB larvae in the cells? Can you smell the fermented honey? Is the honey with the larvae all foamy? How do you know you have Small Hive Beetles?

    If the hive is strong and if it is infested, I would not split it. It needs the strength to fight the beetles. I'd worry about treating the ground around the hive, not the hive. According to Brushy Mt. their feeders with the ladder floats in them tend to draw the beetles into the feeder where they hide under the floats. This might be a way to draw them to one place. But then I have never had to fight SHB's, and I hope I never do.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    ATL, GA, USA
    Posts
    70

    Post

    I have killed the hive beetles personally. At this point, it is a problem that only checkmite might resolve. The only real issue is what to do with the honey supers.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    Post

    I've seen beetles in hives from time to time. If you don't have SHB larvae, they may just be beetles. Beetles live everywhere.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    ATL, GA, USA
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    70

    Post

    I have seen larvae and, they have been identified as shb by members of the local beekepers association.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    I think the main thing is the ground drench to break the life cycle. If you want to use the cumaphos you'll have to pull the honey supers. If you have an extra brood chamber you can put it on top with some foundation so they have something to do while you treat. They will spend most of their efforts drawing comb and you can used any surplus as winter stores. In the fall you can replace some of the empty brood frames with this drawn filled honey.

    You know the recommended treatment is cumphos with the plastic traps. I've seen them in Brushy Mt. Cat # 482.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    ATL, GA, USA
    Posts
    70

    Post

    Yes, I have tried ground drench as well as other cultural solutions but they do not seem to be affecting the cycle as much as you would think, if at all. Believe me I hate chemicals, but at this point, in this region, it doesn't seem like I have many options. Maybe I should move... Anybody has a job for me in the Pacific Northwest?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    Post

    That's one of the benefits of PermaComb over everything else. It's fully drawn comb so the larvae can't go through the cell wals at all. Pretty much they are stuck in one cell.


  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    ATL, GA, USA
    Posts
    70

    Post

    where doe one get perma comb?

    nevermind, found it on the hardware section:

    jseets@northropgrumman.com

    [This message has been edited by GAbee (edited June 30, 2003).]

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    2,480

    Post

    My personal view on the SHB is that we're going to have to learn to live with them - just like we live with wax worms. I think eradication of the SHB is ambitious (at best) – containment “may” be possible, but I’m not holding my breath.

    Unless they are much more vigorous in GA, a strong hive in Virginia seems to be able to "contain" the beetle and not result in a crash of the hive. I also feel that you should be able to pull off a split, but you'll need to carefully monitor the split as well as the mother hive to insure that the beetles don't get the upper hand as can happen when the hive is disturbed too often.

    My understanding is that the biggest issue with SHB is related to honey house management. Keeping extracting equipment clean and honey suppers on the bees until they are extracted is absolutely essential. I know I have SHB, the state knows I have them and its not been a big deal for me - your mileage may vary, but IMHO they are not in the same category as varroa mites!

    Another thing to consider (at least its true in VA) is that the state may restrict movement of hives that are infected with SHB so you may not be able to move that split from the location of the mother hive.

    Best of luck



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