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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Tiller, Oregon USA
    Posts
    209

    Post

    Not looking too good at this point. today was the first day weather permitted a check.
    The original hive has one freshly opened supercedure cell with no brood and no apparent queen. The newly hived swarm has no larva and a freshly drawn supercedure cell.
    I think I need two queens pronto. Sound like it to you?

    ------------------
    the ~ox-{ at www.singingfalls.com

    [This message has been edited by ox (edited May 25, 2004).]

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,268

    Post

    Its rare for a hive to swarm and only leave one queen cell.The odds are there is a virgin in the old hive .Around 2 weeks after she emerges she should be mated and laying,on average.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Tiller, Oregon USA
    Posts
    209

    Post

    I will be looking to see what happens. What boggled my mind is not finding any capped brood at all in the hive. I looked high and low and found only one cell on the center frame. It looked like it was about a little less than two inches long. What do you make of the swarm building a supercedure cell? It's in a TBH and there isn't that many combs fully drawn out.

    ------------------
    the ~ox-{ at www.singingfalls.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,614

    Post

    >What do you make of the swarm building a supercedure cell?

    Is it a cup or an actual cell with a larvae? It's not unusual for a swarm with the old queen in it to supercede shortly after they settle in. But they probably won't get rid of the old queen until the new one is almost ready.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,268

    Post

    Swarming and supercedure are often carried out at the same time in the Spring in this area.The bees decide to replace the old queen,she leaves with the swarm and a new queen takes over.The old queen is soon superceded. I once made a lot of splits using the old shrunk up queens from hives on the brink of swarming(these small queens are very hard to locate)They resumed there normal size and laid good brood patterns.But a month later the majority were replacing the old queen.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Tiller, Oregon USA
    Posts
    209

    Post

    Well the blackberries are just about to bloom in my neck of the woods and I would sure like to be ready. There's plenty of bees in both hives but no brood or larva in either.

    loggermike: you really expect me to patiently wait for two weeks to see if she starts laying? This is like the military...hurry up and wait.
    Otherise the field bees have been hard at it and everything seems normal. I'll wait on that hive to see what happens. I should be seeing brood in a week or ten days I think. The weather is still very unsettled here but it's been good for the flora.

    Michael: There is are no apparent eggs or larva in the new hive. I am considering putting a new queen in the new hive. Is it safe to assume it can be done now?
    Procedure - Once my queen arrives just hunt out the old queen and insert the new queen in her holding cage for about five days then release? Would it be resonable to split the large swarm now? It's fairly large and I do need to increase a little. I made it through the winter with one hive on pins and needles this year. I'd like to have three hives by fall if I could?

    ------------------
    the ~ox-{ at www.singingfalls.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,614

    Post

    >Michael: There is are no apparent eggs or larva in the new hive. I am considering putting a new queen in the new hive. Is it safe to assume it can be done now?

    I don't keep track of everyones hives who are posting. But I've posted the days from egg to laying eggs for a queen a number of times. Has it been that amount of time? Have you given them some eggs to raise a queen if they want? If the bees think the queen is failing to lay when she should they will build queen cells. People often get impatient and buy a queen when a good one is about to start laying.

    >Procedure - Once my queen arrives just hunt out the old queen and insert the new queen in her holding cage for about five days then release?

    Might work. Can you find the old queen?

    >Would it be resonable to split the large swarm now?

    Is there brood? How many frames do the bees cover?

    >It's fairly large and I do need to increase a little. I made it through the winter with one hive on pins and needles this year. I'd like to have three hives by fall if I could?

    You can always split now and recombine if they don't do well by fall and leave them if they do well.

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