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Thread: extractor

  1. #1
    A Devries Guest

    Post

    I just want to know what the advantages are of having a stainless steel extractor versus a galvanized one.

  2. #2
    BILLY BOB Guest

    Post

    Hey,

    Extractors should be made out of stainless steel or plastic. i know you can still find galvanized equipment out there. This equipment is old and out dated, it should be retired.

    Galvanized equipment can stain honey and alter the tast. Honey is acidic. I can react with the type of metal it comes in contact with. Leaving the honey and metal in less than perfect order. Stainless steel is easily cleaned and resist the acid in the honey...although if the SS isn't cleaned after it is use it can corode, from the honey.

    BB

    I wanted to add one more thing...If you do use a galvanized extractor it's ok. What will happon is your honey will have larger amounts of iron in it. Not a good selling point, but it's not going to kill you for eating a spoon full.

    [This message has been edited by BILLY BOB (edited October 04, 2003).]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Lima, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    722

    Post

    If you do have a galvanized extractor, or even a stainless extractor with a few galvanized parts, a food grade epoxy coating will solve the problem.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,909

    Post

    I wouldn't get too concerned about using a galvanized extractor. Yes SS is better, but galvanized will do just the same job, and I bet you would not find any difference in honey quality b/w the two. Honey will react more against galvanized steel, if let in contact for a long, but for the breif time is comes in contact during extracting pritty much eliminates the worry. I don't wash down my extractor until a week or so before the next years extracting season, becasue it keeps the epuipment cleaner. In the time of a year the honey left in thebottom of the extractor blackens, along with the honey in my pump, but not in my SS sump or tank, so there is truth to the idea. When I look at the price tag on the newer SS equipment, it convinces me to continue using my good old reliable and keep saving for down the line
    My galvanized extractor has extracted thousand on thousands of lbs of the whitest honey that a beekeeper can produce. guess the proof is in the pudding...

    Ian

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,881

    Post

    Because galavanized extractors are becoming museum pieces, does anyone have a museum that wants my 1935 Superior Lifetime Eight Frame congenital ? I need the tax deduction.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Post

    so i've been thinking, ther has to be a good use for all these old galvanised extractors,i've got 3 of them.maybe they could be made into washing machines for frames,(or bee suits).too bad i'm not a mooshiner.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    jackson county, indiana
    Posts
    27

    Post

    Hoosierhiver I am just south of you in jackson county. I have a old galvanized extracter. Lets get together make some shine and sell it at the bike rally at Bean Blossom.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    fall city Wa USA
    Posts
    112

    Post

    I bought an old galvanized extractor for $15. I took the Galvanized barrel off and replaced it with a White Plastic food grade barrel. Drilled some holes in the bottom and screwed it to a pallet. When I stand on the pallet to extract it stays put.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Post

    in mason jars, with a big chunk of comb in each one.

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