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Thread: Brood Question

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Palestine, Tx. 75801
    Posts
    485

    Post

    During a cut out, in 60-70-degree themperature, how long does it take for the brood comb to chill?
    jrhelliott@gmail.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,113

    Post

    I guess I don't think about that. I just keep working until I'm done on a cut out. But the bees are always trying to keep it warm and if there are enough bees to succeed, then the amount of time won't matter. If there are NOT enough to keep it warm, then it will probably get chilled.

    You do what you can.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    When removing bees from a building wall, or from anywhere they are not welcomed for that matter, they are 'cut out'.

    You have to cut out the material to get to them, then you have to cut out the wax to remove it/them.

    Cut-out.
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Milford, MI
    Posts
    328

    Post

    They are referring to a "Cut out" as a colony of bees that has inhabited a house or tree that needs to be cut out and relocated.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Central Square, NY, Oswego County
    Posts
    814

    Post

    Kinda mean but since your cutting them out of a tree or house it really does not matter. The alternative of killing off the whole hive vs the hive having some chilled brood is acceptable. If the brood is not capped then they can stand an hour or so being 'chilled' but if they are capped then the brood can last longer in the cold. I would concentrate more on sealed brood then opened when cutting out. Also make sure you give them some of their honey comb to work with. If the honey comb is 'messy', plaster, dirt, dead bees, etc then just take the whole mess to the new site and let these bees clean it out. It will help them in the long run in setting up house.
    Dan

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