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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Question

    I aquired some old equpment this weekend,(I need boxes!), from a beekeeper who quit after the varroa decimated his bees and he got discouraged.

    He said that I should spray a twenty percent solution of Clorox on the boxes to disenfect them. I'm listening to a beehadder who lost his bees?

    So after scraping what I could off and burning all the frames, bad boxes and scrapings, I trimmed the edges off and shortened them to Permacomb depth. (6 3/8") I still need to wire off the outsides some more and tighten them up with screws, and repaint. Well gramps always said "If some is good, more is better!" So I sprayed the insides with pure Clorox...

    My question is, should I still flame the insides of the boxes?

    Bill

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    I take it your burning for foulbrood. Please realize that spores on the end of a pin could infect the entire state population of hives. I believe that burning and other methods could not possible get rid of 100% of spores that could be in a box. Think about the cracks, under propolis or wax, and other places to be exposed later.
    The best is to know the beekeeper and the equipment your going to buy.
    I also say that the best way to combat FB is to maintain strong hives and be competent beekeepers.
    Sorry if your concerned about something else.

    I would lay money that most hives already have the spore and are waiting to take advantage of a weakened hive.

    [This message has been edited by BjornBee (edited June 16, 2003).]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,925

    Post

    My guess is all hives have some AFB spores. If you want to do something about AFB spores, clorox will do nothing at all. It might help on Chalkbrood spores, it might help on EFB bacteria, but it won't touch AFB spores. Charring them will kill most of the AFB spores, but not necessarily all of them. There is some kind of chemical chamber that some states have to treat equipment, but we don't have that here, so I'm not up on that. Also some states have irradiation available for equipment. This will kill the AFB.

    The question is "what killed the previous occupants?" The answer, at this point, is anybody's guess.

    If you already burned the frames you may as well char the boxes. It's not that hard if you've ever started a fire with gasoline you have most of the talent required. The details are given in ABC XYZ of beekeeping and, I'm sure, some other good books.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    I just want to play it safe and make sure I kill any possible problem that could come up.

    I wasn't worried about any one item, just wanted to cover the bases. The fellow just said he lost his bees to the varroa mites.

    I'll get the flame thrower going tonight, thanks, guys.

    Bill

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,925

    Post

    If you want to play it safe, that's what I'd do. But I'm guessing it was probably mites.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Marietta, GA USA
    Posts
    26

    Post

    That's the reason though tempting I try to stay away from old equipment, especially some that's been sitting around for a while. Also, most of the time, what you are buying is firewood.

    The fumigation chamber that was discussed uses ethylene oxide I think. The problem is that the average person can't get the stuff.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Bellingham WA USA
    Posts
    114

    Post

    If it's called an autoclave, then it likely is NOT a fumigation machine (although some chemical sterilizers are called that) Technically and autoclave used steam / heat / time to literally sterilize the contents - as for surgical instruments. They WILL kill spores providing all the requirements are met, one of which generally includes removing any "organic matter" that could protect cells / bacteria from the proper conditions... Keep in mind that the heat in a true autoclave would destroy wax and possibly some plastics it's generaly 250F at 30PSI.

  8. #8

    Post

    As I said, the common parlance around the office is to call it an autoclave. I meant that it is one in the broadest sense of the word in that the hive goes into an enclosed area and is cleaned. I'm all too familiar with an autoclave used for surgical instruments. The device we have is used to clean hives of AFB. Call it what you like.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    Can you tell me anything about beekeepers cost to use, cost of equipment to the state, how many hives it holds, time involved with process and what is the % of spores eliminated. I'm skeptical of the process since these spores are under wax and propolis, inside cracks, etc. I am asking because I have no knowledge about this at all.
    Thank you.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    TMI is close enough to spit on. I've thought that the warning siren down the street would be a good place for a swarm box. I just thought maybe thats the reason I'm crazy enough to be a beekeeper.

    A state with enough funds to buy new trucks and provide free apiary services? Must be that old geezer Byrd grabbing more of those tax dollars.

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