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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Mineral, Virginia
    Posts
    188

    Post

    Yesterday I noticed quite a few bees on the landing area of the bottom board, covering it actually. Further up the face of the brood box there was a clump that fluctuated in size from golf ball to tennis ball in size.

    I got concerned and opened up the hive to take a look. I have about 72 million bees in that box! I had added another deep on top of this one, but they seem uninterested.

    I'm not sure what I'm looking for, but I found no cells being constructed from the bottoms of the frames, so I figured they were just hanging out as it was quite hot.

    Should I put the empty on the bottom?

    I tilted the brood box on my other hive and I do see some comb building activity on the bottoms of the frames. Can someone post a link of a picture showing an example of a queen cell under construction?

    Many Thanks.

    Scott

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    ATL, GA, USA
    Posts
    70

    Post

    Mine are doing the same thing... seems like they are hot to me

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,742

    Post

    Ventilation is what you need.

    Prop up the inner cover and lid with a stick. in the front.

    I bet you'll see a lot of them go back inside.

    Also... If you have a Screened Bottom board, put it on that with it open. If you have a slatted rack put that on. If you have an old super, drill some holes and screen them over and put two more holes in the inner cover and screen all of those and put the vent box (old super with screened holes) on top of the screened inner cover with the lid on top of that. Now you have a lot more ventilation.

    Also put some water out with a lot of wood scraps floating in it for the bees to land on. Or buy one of those soaker hoses that are just porus rubber and run it somewhere you'd like to water anyway. That way the bees can drink off of the hose and you can water your flowers, trees or whatever.

    Just for fun, try hosing down the hives from the back (so you don't get those bees on the front), just enough to get the outside wet. That cools things off quickly. See if they don't go back inside.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,356

    Post

    Could also mean not much nectar out in the fields.Last week I drove into a yard on a hot day and there were thousands of bees hanging out,covering the whole front and some of the sides,but not much flight.No nectar shook out of the combs.Today I went to the same yard and it is even hotter.But every bee was in the air flying to and from an alfalfa field a mile away that just started to bloom.So when its hot and theres not much to do,they just lay around ,drink beer and visit!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,837

    Wink

    Greetings . . .

    My hive is lightly shaded from about 10am thru 6pm. I have made a "special" inner-cover that is ALL wire mesh and raise the top-cover w/ 3/4" spacers. The hive sets on an elevated stand w/ open SSB. I am not using a slatted rack.

    Last evening (8:30pm) the landing board (5x16) was covered w/ bees, a "beard" of bees was also from the hive entrance up 6" on front of hive. This afternoon (4:00pm) bees covered an area about 3x8 on the landing board.

    At 4:00pm I made my regularly "scheduled" inspection, found capped honey in 8 frames of top brood chamber, capped brood in middle chamber, and lots of bees clustered under bottom chamber. Perhaps a slatted rack IS needed.

    I am not sure, but the "flow" may be a little slow now. I don't think my bees are hot, they may be loafing, hope their beer-drinking does not affect the stored honey.

    Dave W

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    If they are to maintain an internal temp of 91-92 degrees and its 90 degrees outside, and taking the heat added by brood and nurse bees into account, then how many bees do are needed in the hive? Not many. Thats why in the evening when all the field bees come back they hang outside. It just means they do not need any added heat inside.

    This is the time when bees will experience a stop in nectar and you should be looking for queens to stop laying. stnectardurth

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,356

    Post

    Yep,bees hang out at night to keep cool.The only time it concerns me is when they have to be moved and there are big clusters all over the lifting cleats,takes a lot of smoking to get them in and they start coming out again as soon as they are loaded.Now during swarming season if a hive is clustering outside while the rest are working,its worth taking a look for cells but doesnt always mean there will be any.

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