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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Mineral, Virginia
    Posts
    188

    Post

    When I was inspecting one of my hives this past weekend, I damaged an outer frame foundation because the bees had burred it to the sidewall of the brood box. For the time being I simply recovered the foundation/comb that pealed off and put the frame back in the hive.

    Due to a shortage of supplies, I just got around to doing what I assumed needed to be done, that was replace the damaged frame. Well, for beginners they had already started to fill in the hole, but with comb cell roughly twice the size of the original. These cells are huge, all of them! I'll try to get pics up in the next week or so.

    The next part is what fascinated me the most

    After persuading all the bees on the damaged frame to abandon ship, I brought it in the house to allow my family to sample the capped honey, show them the frame etc. During this time, about 4 bees popped out and my daughter was aghast. She insisted I take them back to the hive so I obliged. The first one I put on the entrance board and she was summarily killed. I was surprised how fast they did it; this frame with a few brood had just been in the hive 30 minutes prior.

    The next 3 I dropped in the hive directly, 2 fell between the frames, the 3rd fell on the top and was immediately attacked as well.

    From this I draw the conclusion that the bees have no idea to tell who is “born” to their hive unless they see/sense them emerge from the cell from within the brood area? Every bee is considered an imposter? Lastly, did I need to replace the frame with new foundation? I wasn’t real excited that it looked like they were building an entire drone nursery.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,742

    Post

    >For the time being I simply recovered the foundation/comb that pealed off and put the frame back in the hive.

    If you don't have a frame with foundation any frame is better than no frame. You did the right thing.

    >Due to a shortage of supplies, I just got around to doing what I assumed needed to be done, that was replace the damaged frame.

    It's on the outside so it will probably be mostly used for honey anyway. You could just leave it.

    >Well, for beginners they had already started to fill in the hole, but with comb cell roughly twice the size of the original. These cells are huge, all of them! I'll try to get pics up in the next week or so.

    Try measuring across ten and divide by ten. They are probably larger than drone cells. Standard Drone foundation is around 6.4mm. The bees will build larger for honey storage.

    >After persuading all the bees on the damaged frame to abandon ship, I brought it in the house to allow my family to sample the capped honey, show them the frame etc. During this time, about 4 bees popped out

    Emerged? So there was emerging brood on the frame?

    >and my daughter was aghast. She insisted I take them back to the hive so I obliged. The first one I put on the entrance board and she was summarily killed. I was surprised how fast they did it; this frame with a few brood had just been in the hive 30 minutes prior.

    I reall think a lot of what the gaurd bees look for is behaviour more than smell. If a bee acts like it know what they are doing and they belong the gaurds tend to accept that. If they act like they are being agressive the gaurds attack. If they act submissive, they might be allowed in or they might get attacked.

    >The next 3 I dropped in the hive directly, 2 fell between the frames, the 3rd fell on the top and was immediately attacked as well.

    This seems very odd to me. Usually inside there are no guard bees so it's not so likely they would attack.

    >From this I draw the conclusion that the bees have no idea to tell who is “born” to their hive unless they see/sense them emerge from the cell from within the brood area?

    Well, they don't memorize every bee.

    >Every bee is considered an imposter?

    I think it's based on if they act lost, or they act like they know what they are doing or they act agressive.

    >Lastly, did I need to replace the frame with new foundation?

    That would have been nice, but if you didn't hve any then a frame was better than a lot of cross combs.

    >I wasnÂ’t real excited that it looked like they were building an entire drone nursery.

    Was there drone brood in it? They have a real need to build drone cells, so when they get some open space they will try to do that.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Mineral, Virginia
    Posts
    188

    Post

    >After persuading all the bees on the damaged frame to abandon ship, I brought it in the house to allow my family to sample the capped honey, show them the frame etc. During this time, about 4 bees popped out

    Emerged? So there was emerging brood on the frame?

    I really need to buy a digital camera. Yes, but it was a tiny amount. The side of the foundation nearest the wall was drawn fully out, but only part of the cells had brood in them in varying stages. The side facing the interior of the hive had not been drawn at all.

    Considering the entire side of the frame, less than 20% of it had brood of varying stages. Over half the foundation fell out during the inspection this past weekend, so in the scheme of things, I made the decision to replace it with a fresh frame and foundation and restart feeding. In the last 18 hours, only those 4 emerged, but I supposed some of that could be temperature related as it is around 74 degrees in my house, but that's just a guess!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Sapulpa,OK USA
    Posts
    174

    Smile

    I removed a frame of mostly drone cells recently to uncap some and check for mites. Some started emerging and my four year old loved it. Of couse she always has to go to the bee yard when I go she loves watching the bees. If you had left this frame it probably would have been filled with Honey and drones along the bottom. Wich drone cells can always be removed on a regular basis to check for mites.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Mineral, Virginia
    Posts
    188

    Post

    it was definately an awesome experience. We watched them chew the remainder of the cap out of the way ans slowly pull themselves out. My wife said it looked like they had "sea legs" as they staggered around for a few minutes, then it looked like they went looking for something to do.

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