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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Post

    I have a strong hive that I bought from an old beekeeper and I was wondering what would happen if I take some frames of brood, pollen, and honey and place it in a nuc with one or two undrawn frames and interduce a russian queen. Then wait until maybe september and then move those frames and some undrawn frames into one deep. while all this is going on, I would feed them 2 parts sugar to 1 part water.

    would this work or is it to late? My friend is raising russian queens and I really want to get one but only if my split would survive the winter.

    any thoughts?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,101

    Post

    If you are looking for a sure thing, it's too late in the year for that. But if you want to try it it might work. Weather is unpredictable. Bees are unpredictable. Queens are unpreditable.

    If you do the split and they don't build up enough to make it on their own, do you have other hives to boost them with? Do you have another weak hive that you would consider combining them with? How bad would it be if they don't build up enough to overwinter?


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Post

    Well, I guess I am just ancy (sp?) and cant wait until spring. I do not want to loose the bees because all I have is one strong hive and I would like them to overwinter well. I would like a small honey crop from them next year if possible. I do not want to loose any more at this point yet either so I suppose it is to risky.

    how about an observation hive? If i make one, will it work this time of year if I get bees from another beekeeper?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Lima, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    722

    Post

    You could try overwintering the split on top of the parent hive with a double screen board between.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Central Square, NY, Oswego County
    Posts
    814

    Post

    I do the same as tarheit does. These nucs then become my main hives by replacing the old queens underneath them. Then I raise queens for selling and as fall comes redo the nuc thing all over again. I have had great success doing that. Plus if any hives don't make it I already have a replacement. I do 18 main hive like this and they have 18 nucs on top. These nucs have 2 medium boxes for brood and honey. I also give all the hives some fondant in the spring since we have had wet springs here lately and this helps them till the spring blossoms start and they can fly out to get the sweet stuff.
    See http://www.ingenbees.com/fondant.shtml
    Dan

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Post

    bjerm2:

    I do not understand.

    I would like to split my strong hive using a nuc and interducing a new queen. However, I think it is to late in the season for the nuc to be able to get ready for the winter.

    also... dont the queens slow down in laying eggs this time of year? if I do split the hives and interduce a new queen in the nuc, will the queen know that she needs to increase her population before winter and lay eggs rather then slowing down like most queens do?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Central Square, NY, Oswego County
    Posts
    814

    Post

    Ok, sorry about not making it clear.

    What I do is in late summer like mid July - mid August I make a split (nuc) with a few frames of brood, honey, and some bees shaken into the supper from the hive below. Usually about 4-5 frames of bees that were on the frames making sure the old queen is not in the frames to be shaken. This is the time of the year where you have a surplus of bees anyway and the fall flow will be starting.
    I then put this on top of a hive using an inner cover with a separate entrance facing in the opposite direction of the hive below. The inner cover hole, that is in the center I screen in both sides using regular window screening. This allows the heat from the hive below to keep the nuc warm and the queens will not be able to sting each other.
    I then give them a queen or queen cell, depending how late in the season it is and give them some feed to stimulate the queen to lay. I then keep an eye on the nuc and in the fall and I give them an additional medium supper with honey for the winter. This works out well for them. And yes the new queen will lay up a lot of eggs to get them ready for winter.
    I hope this explination helps you.
    Dan

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