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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Snohomish, WA, USA
    Posts
    33

    Post

    I have a puzzle for you. A neighbor says she saw a huge swarm in our tree (2 separate cones of bees)for the majority of the day and then "the sky was black with bees". Sick at heart we looked in the hive today and it looks just as it did when we checked on Thursday. There were some queen cells (3 swarm based on the placement on lower part of frame)but we just left them alone and added a honey super. They still are drawing out the #1 and #10 frames on the 2nd brood frame. If they don't look like they've swarmed and they had ample room, did they really swarm. It seems too much of a coincidence to have a feral swarm in our tree in town. Our other hive has more bees (always has) but they are currently infected with a black, hairless virus. We gave them another honey super (total of 2) to be sure they have enough room. All input is appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,992

    Post

    If a tree falls in the forest and nobody hears it, is there really a sound ?

    If bees swarm and nobody see them, did they really swarm ?

    Life is full of difficult questions....

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Auburn, Wa
    Posts
    134

    Post

    I know 3 beekeepers in Snohomish, 1 in Machias, and 2 in Monroe. Im sure there are many others (like you) that I dont know. those bees could have came from anywhere. as for your black hairless bees, take a couple in to Jean at www.beezneezapiary.com she is pretty knowledgable about bee diasease.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    Does your nieghbor drink? Perhaps a shroom or two? What does the "sky was black" really mean? Was this an accurate discription?

    A swarm will very likely (almost always) land within site of the original hive, for some period of time. Usually within 300 feet. There is about a 99% chance the swarm was from your own hive. Most beekeepers do not even know the hive has swarmed. And it can be hard to tell. And I have also had more than one hive swarm at the same time. As if the first started and triggered the second in all the frenzy. I caught two swarms within one foot of each other last week. And was surprised when both queens were found. I expected one queen between the two hive boxes.

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