Page 5 of 18 FirstFirst ... 3456715 ... LastLast
Results 81 to 100 of 342
  1. #81
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Arundel, Maine USA
    Posts
    1,207

    Post

    Hi all, seems a little late to chime in, but I just recently acquired a nuc of bees, and the woman who sold them to me went from a single hive to 11 of her own healthy hives, and she has sold 9 this year! She gave me a recipe for what she calls "grease patties" 1 cup sugar, 1/2 cup crisco, about 7-10 shakes of wintergreen essential oil. Make into patties on waxed paper. Invert patty on to of frames. The theory is that the bees will see the patty and say "what they hell is this" being such great housekeepers, they will carry the grease out, covering themselves in the grease, and suffocating the mites & making it so their suction cuppy hands cant hold onto the bees. The essential oil will be transferred to the honey and brood where is is thought to produce deformed mites that cannot hold on to their host. This obviously cannot be used while supers are on the hive unless you enjoy the taste of wintergreen honey! Any thoughts on this treatment. Be nice...I'm new here. hehe.

    Thanks!
    Let's BEE friends

  2. #82
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Benton County, Oregon
    Posts
    408

    Post

    Well.. I will continue counting the freakin mites as long as someone sees it as a productive pastime.
    On the other hand I am wondering if there is something more pro-active I can be doing to save this hive?
    As a side note another hive I keep not even 30 feet from the one I have been posting about showed today a mite count of ZERO. What gives?
    Dan

  3. #83
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    >As a side note another hive I keep not even 30 feet from the one I have been posting about showed today a mite count of ZERO. What gives?

    Are you treating them too, or just checking drops?
    Dulcius ex asperis

  4. #84
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Massillon, Ohio
    Posts
    3,380

    Post

    > Any thoughts on this treatment. <

    Hummingbird,

    I use regular Grease Patties year round, sugar and Crisco, without essential oils. This way I am certain that none of the hives' honey has been tainted. Plain Grease patties are very effective in "controlling" Tracheal Mite but to have an impact on the Varroa Mite as well, they should also contain Wintergreen oil and Salt. This site will give you a little information on the patties. Hope this helps some.

    http://www.wvu.edu/~agexten/varroa/G...e%20patties%22

    [size="1"][ August 27, 2006, 08:49 AM: Message edited by: Mike Gillmore ][/size]
    To everything there is a season....

  5. #85
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    central jersey
    Posts
    77

    Post

    mike, for using grease patties over the winter, do you have them on just the frames of the top box (assuming two deeps, like mine) or on top of the frames of both boxes (i.e., sandwiched between the boxes)?

    poor longarm, i'm impressed he hasn't just run away screaming yet.

  6. #86
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Benton County, Oregon
    Posts
    408

    Post

    today's count: 94.

    George: Yes the other hive is being treated the same way/time as this infected hive. Its count again today: zero mites.

  7. #87
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    >Yes the other hive is being treated the same way/time as this infected hive.

    Thanks Longarm.

    OK. Now someone explain to me why the drop in his infested hive is fully attributable to mite immigration, as DaveW suggests? If they're immigrating into one hive at the rate of a hundred or so every day, why aren't any turning up in his other hive?

    I didn't believe his continuing daily drop was due to immigration in the first place but I didn't have a basis to argue the point. Now I do.

    DaveW: Defend yourself!
    Dulcius ex asperis

  8. #88
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,837

    Post

    Well George [img]smile.gif[/img]

    We have two hives, one is robbing and one is not. Where is the robbing hive getting the mites? We dont know for sure [img]smile.gif[/img] , do we?


    longarm . . .
    What are YOU learning from this "productive pastime"? Please, please, please keep counting.

    >wondering if there is something more pro-active I can be doing to save this hive?

    This hive needs a new queen. August is said to be a good time to requeen. But, if this hive IS being invaded by a 100 or so mites a day and that continues AFTER you remove the strips, two things cound happen. You could treat again w/ something DIFFERENT, like OA in November, and hope hive pulls through winter. Or, order new package to replace the dead hive that may collapse yet this fall.

    Sorry, I dont have good news.
    Remember, I am NOT a HERO!

  9. #89
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Benton County, Oregon
    Posts
    408

    Post

    '156 mites on the wall'.. etc.

  10. #90
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hamilton, Alabama
    Posts
    1,197

    Post

    Fishy, Fishy, Fishy.

    You started treatment on August 4th if my memory is correct. All unsealed brood should have been capped and have emerged by August 25th. That means the varroa counts should have dropped to very low levels by now.

    If the theory does not agree with the facts, throw out the theory and come up with a new theory that does fit the facts. The only supportable conclusion is that this colony is bringing in a huge load of varroa on a daily basis. The only place they could be getting that much of a mite load is from another heavily infested colony. I'll agree with the above. This colony is robbing a severely infested colony somewhere nearby. You probably have one colony robbing and another colony staying at home minding its business.

    Do you have a fall honeyflow? If so, when does it start? I'm guessing goldenrod should start to bloom sometime soon. When that happens, the bees will be busy gathering nectar and will stop the robbing.

    Just as a sideline, if you stop treating now, within a month this colony will be just as badly parasitized by varroa as it was before you started treating. This emphasizes that treatment is NOT a panacea. Its one possible step in a sequence of actions with lots of negatives along the way. One beekeeper I know leaves the apistan strips on his colonies all winter long. This is bad all the way around because it causes maximum comb contamination.

    Fusion

  11. #91
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    Well, I propose that the mites are still breeding. I don't believe all the original mites in Longarm's hive are dead and if there's a hive nearby crashing from varroa, why aren't both of his hives robbing it out? Defending the proposition that the ongong mite drop is due to immigration alone by saying "one is robbing and one is not." doesn't work for me Dave [img]smile.gif[/img] It seems to me that when robbing is the order of the day, hives are either robbing, or being robbed and if they're strong enough to defend against robbing, they're probably the ones doing the robbing [img]smile.gif[/img]

    If dealing with mites were as simple as putting Apistan strips in your hives for 40 days once a year, life would be easy and beekeeping would be easy too. It's a well known fact that treating hives while the bees are actively raising brood is if not a losing battle, then a war of attrition and all you can really hope to do is knock down the mite population to the point where the bees can handle the load. You shouldn't expect any decisive battles! Successfully beating mites involves vigilance and an integrated management strategy- there ain't no Silver Bullet.

    I am reminded of Stephen Martin's example of a hive with 5000 mites in it being treated with a 98% effective treatment once a year. It took 3 years to reduce the mite population to zero.
    Dulcius ex asperis

  12. #92
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Post

    I believe if I had 1 hive with this problem and another hive with no problem I'd be putting a lot of effort into raising a queen from the hive with no problem
    do you still have time for that where you are?

    Dave

  13. #93
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Benton County, Oregon
    Posts
    408

    Post

    Dave,
    Thanks for the input. I might have time to raise a queen from the 'good' hive.... on the other hand there is a breedder in the immediate area who breeds hygenics.
    But will dropping a new queen into this infested hive make any difference??
    Dan

  14. #94
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Post

    apparently there's a beekeeper sitting at your keyboard who HAS hygenic bee's [img]smile.gif[/img]
    unfortunately changing the queen in your hive won't be a "quick fix"
    I think if I were in your boot's I'd continue down the path you're on and hope you can get em thru the winter
    next spring I'd focus on getting a queen from your "good" hive to requeen this one
    why buy a queen from some guy down the road when you have a proven performer in your yard??
    if the hive with mites croaks, where ya gonna get replacements from?? (hint, hint, the good hive) [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Dave

    [edit]there are several techniques for easily raising one or two queens from a hive or making a split

    [size="1"][ August 28, 2006, 08:24 PM: Message edited by: drobbins ][/size]

  15. #95
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    >I think if I were in your boot's I'd continue down the path you're on and hope you can get em thru the winter

    I agree.
    Dulcius ex asperis

  16. #96
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Nevada County, CA
    Posts
    1,083

    Post

    Interesting observations on some mite counts.

    Treated four hives with oxalic acid yeasterday. None of these hive had been treated all summer because they were involved in a queen rearing program.

    Hive zero (haven't had time to number it) was used as a queenless finisher. Was given sealed brood only to keep it up to strength. Raised no brood all summer. Has a new queen and brood nest about the size of a small orange 24 hr post treatment 15 mites.

    Hive 15 was a support hive that provided the brood for one of the finishers. Had superseded recently and the new queen just started laying. Eggs present but no larvae. 24 hr post treatment 1900 mites.

    Hive 10, support hive, superseded, new queen just took mating flight yesterday. 24 hr post treatment 1600 mites. This hive is the result of combining the support have and finisher hive from this unit.

    All three of these had virtually no brood so I assume almost all of the mites were on the bees when treated so the mite fall should represent a pretty good housecleaning.

    I don't have time to do daily counts but I will be retreating everything around October and will re check at that time.
    doug

  17. #97
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Benton County, Oregon
    Posts
    408

    Post

    Dave and George - Thank you both for the continued input on what to do.
    I had been planning to make splits for friends next year .. turns out I may need to to keep bees in MY boxes.

  18. #98
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Camas, WA
    Posts
    1,919

    Post

    It seems to me that when robbing is the order of the day, hives are either robbing, or being robbed and if they're strong enough to defend against robbing, they're probably the ones doing the robbing
    I don't believe that is true. My experience is when I see robbing in my yard, I can tell which hive it is. Many times it is just one or two.

    If one hive has a lot more entrance activity, that is probably the robbing hive. When I put my wet supers out in my lawn, only two hives seem to find them. The others had only a small amount of activity while those two had a lot of activity by 6:00 am.

    In our area, from August 1 to November will be robbing season. I am in the same general area as Longarm. We have none in the spring or early summer.

    I have a hive like Longarm. Four of my hives were dropping 20-40 mites per day. I have one that dropped one mite after 7 days. I don't know why. It was my best producer this year and was a cutout from a wood duck house this spring. I got it in April and it had no mites in June that I could detect.

    [size="1"][ August 29, 2006, 12:04 AM: Message edited by: beedeetee ][/size]
    Bruce

  19. #99
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hamilton, Alabama
    Posts
    1,197

    Post

    George,

    If you are correct re the mites are still breeding, then the hive would have to be overrun with mites to drop ~150 per day. It would be crashing big time. It would also be conclusive proof that the mites were apistan tolerant.

    On the other hand, if the ~150 mites per day are dropping because they are being killed by the apistan, then the mites are coming from elsewhere.

    There is no middle ground here. Either the colony is on the verge of total crash or else its nearly mite free with a large load of mites entering the colony each day.

    Fusion

  20. #100
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    >There is no middle ground here.

    Heh. Well, I'm not saying there isn't any immigration going on, but I'll stand by my opinion, it's consistent with my stand throughout this and similar threads: I think the mites are still breeding. If I'm wrong, well, I've got nothing to lose but my reputation! I'll be devastated, but hopefully I'll still be able to look at myself in the mirror in the morning!

    Referring back to the beginning of this thread, this is a first-year hive of italians, started from a 3# package. It's unusual but not unheard of for first year packages to have such a mite load the first summer. Packages are typically treated and if they're not mite-free to begin with, they're virtually so. Clearly this hive started with a healthy mite load. This situation might be due to the presence of restistant mites, or the package may not have been properly treated. Dunno.

    >It would be crashing big time. It would also be conclusive proof that the mites were apistan tolerant.

    It was beginning to crash. It was dropping in excess of 70 mites a day and rising. As for Apistan tolerance, that's a real possibility.

    There are always going to be some resistant mites. Always. That's why there are no 100% effective treatments, except for Michael Bush's preferred single-application dynamite treatment of course [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Furthermore, resistance develops rapidly with varroa because the majority of the mites inbreed and traits favoring resistance are passed on directly. Only if multiple foundress mites enter the same cell to breed is cross breeding possible, and even then it's not guaranteed- if 2 foundress mites enter a cell, there's only a 50:50 chance that the females will mate with other than their own brother.

    If any of you have ever played with VarroaPop, the mite population modeling software developed by Dr. Gloria DeGrandi-Hoffman of the Carl Hayden Bee Research Lab and available for free download, you might have a greater appreciation for the way varroa populations can explode exponentially under the right conditions.
    Dulcius ex asperis

Page 5 of 18 FirstFirst ... 3456715 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads