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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    portland
    Posts
    85
    About 6-8 weeks ago I combined a small swarm with a productive queen with a very productive hive via newspaper and a queen excluder. The theory bee-ing that the strong hive would help build out foundation and help care for the queen and brood. about a month ago the swarm hive was doing very well so I pulled it off the other hive, slapped a super on it and started to feed it to build up winter stores.

    Now the queen in the original hive has pretty much stopped laying. I thought it was just "a phase" she was going through but I opened the hive the other day and the only thing in there is some pollen, nectar and a few sealed brood that must be hatching as I write this. So the question is..

    Was I wrong to combine the hives? I thought it was a good way to get more bees to wrok on the swarm hive?

    And what can I expect this queen to do? Will she ever start laying again?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,566

    Post

    I don't think combining them had anything to do with it. It's probably because the days are getting short and it's time (by bee time) to stop raising brood. I don't know how bees act in your climate, but around here the queens are also stopping. It's just that time of year.

  3. #3

    Wink

    I agree with Michael....welcome to the "beekeeper's year".

    Learn from your bees - they have a lot to "teach" you about nature, seasons of the year, etc.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    portland
    Posts
    85

    Post

    I thought about that as well, but the rest of my queens are still laying. one of the hives has 8 frames of sealed brood..The WHOLE frame. There going to eat their way out of ouse and home soon.

  5. #5
    BILLY BOB Guest

    Post

    I don't think I have ever heard of a queen to just stop laying without a good reason. Even when they turn into drone layers they keep laying eggs. I agree with Michael and the others.

    Winter is comming. Wait and see how this hive stands up to the cold winter months. With less brood/bees to over winter the hive should do better. Remember one of the trates that queens are slected for is brood production. Some queens will lay too much at the wrong time. Give Her a chance and see what she does.

    You said most of your queens are still laying, but how much nector is comming in? So why are they laying? You may have a real good queen on your hands! One that you will not have to feed all winter.


    BB

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
    Posts
    2,368

    Question

    Are you sure there is a queen?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

    Post

    I'd be looking for the queen, myself. Good question.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Drums, PA, USA
    Posts
    331

    Post

    I thought about that as well, but the rest of my queens are still laying. one of the hives has 8 frames of sealed brood..The WHOLE frame. There going to eat their way out of ouse and home soon.

    I had a queen a few years ago do the same thing. After thinking about it, it was a queen from the south, and the rest of the queens were the ones I raised. I concluded, it was the end of her season, but my bees, being adapted to the climate, knew there was still time to keep working. This is one of the reasons why I wanted to develop my own line of bees. Not necessarily to sell, but for the adaptation to my area. We have a variety of weather patterns here, and bees fit for the area, will produce longer and better.

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