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Thread: what to do

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
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    Pinewood Minnesota
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    Approaching 2nd year of beekeeping. Last fall when I extracted, I had a number of frames that were uncapped or just barely capped, so I did not extract them. Now with the upcoming season approaching, what should I do with those frames that were not extracted. they've been in my shed all winter and have been through a few weeks of -20 weather, and all look fine. Do I need to get them empty, or will the bees do that. Not sure if they fermented(had no bad smell to them), but just wondering the plan of attack I need for them. Steve
    If your pulling a trigger, it really isn't bowhunting

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Bismarck, ND USA
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    514

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    I'd just feed them back to the hives that need it this Spring. Swap them for empty frames when the weather allows.
    Gregg Stewart

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
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    Sit them in front of the hives (50-100ft.) when they begin to fly and temps are above 50-55. They will "reprocess" the honey and this way it is as good as new as they put it back in the hive. If its fermented, crystalized, moldy, or just old...I would not put back directly into the hive, but instead would let them clean and store as they see fit.

    If its emergency feeding then putting it directly into the hive may be needed. But if its not an emergency, let them bring it back into the hive.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Williston, NC, USA
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    1,779

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    If they're not fermented or moldy, I'd put them in the hives. Experience has taught that if I leave frames with honey sitting outside the hives as BjornBee suggests, critters come in the night and destroy the comb!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
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    Tia,
    Are you saying that humans of the caucasian race are destroying your comb at night? These poor "white" critter probably just need something to eat. [img]smile.gif[/img] Ah, the good old times and fond memories .....

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Hirschbach, Bavaria, Germany
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    The old Bjorne Is back
    Procrastination is the assassination of inspiration.
    www.customwoodkitsinternational.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
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    After that last post (above), I had a hard time logging on to beesource last night aroung 10pm. It kept crossing me over to another site hosted by "birkey" and then even said there was no website by the name "beesource". I know sometimes I like to have fun and push the limit, but I thought I had been barred from the site. I didn't think it was that bad, but thought maybe I need to lighten up a bit. Glad to still be hear this morning.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    waco, tx
    Posts
    528

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    I couldn't get onto the website at all last night from bout 7pmcst until I quit trying bout 11pm. no chat

    Lew

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Bismarck, ND USA
    Posts
    514

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    I couldn't get on last night either, thought it was my computer, but I guess not.
    Gregg Stewart

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
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    >>I thought I had been barred from the site

    So was my impression, love this site.

    Steve, you know what you need? A honey moisture tester, refractometer. Then there is no guessing what should not be extracted. Especially for small producers who dont have a whack of honey to blend in some high moisture honey with.

    If it will easily shake from the comb, dont extract it. If it hangs in and looks watery, you are likely close to the 20%-22% mark.

    There is no rule that all uncapped honey is not cured. Last year I extracted my first pull at 15%-16% moisture, and most of my combs were only 1/3 capped over, some not at all.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

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