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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Rockford, Michigan
    Posts
    147

    Post

    The nights have been in the single digits and upper 20's low 30's for highs. I've had my 1 gal. zip-loc syrup bags on the top frames with a medium super surrounding it for 2 weeks now, and yet the bees seem to have zero interest in the syrup bag. I suspect it could be that it's too cold for bee movement. I've also sprinkled some granulated sugar on the top bars.
    So if the bees don't feed then there is no stimulation, and no build-up!

    What was interesting though was when I put the bag of syrup in the hive, the syrup was still warm. The bees sensed this right off and were all over the bag,probably due to the warmth. Since that one warm sunny day 2 weeks ago that made it into the 50's when I put the bag in, there has been zero interest in the syrup bag.

    Any ideas on how to get them stimulated?
    Thank you!

    Oh, and I did take one of my straight razors and put some slits into the top of the bag. LOL

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
    Posts
    2,368

    Post

    Same thing here, it's just been to cold. They are raising brood though, I lost one hive to starvation a few days ago with a full feeder on. They should show lots of interest as soon as this cold snap breaks.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Warren County, Kentucky
    Posts
    113

    Post

    Hey y'all here's a newbie question about this very thing:

    I read something once about mixing up syrup in a "sprinkler pail" for emergencies like this. I don't have bees yet (they arrive next month), but with the weather we're having in KY this year, I'm thinking about future years when this might happen again. It would break my heart for the bees to starve wtih plenty of food right there just because of the stinking weather. :0(

    So this thing I read had basically a modified sprinkler can like you'd water plants with (one of the big ones) and filled it with warm sugar syrup and opened the hive and sprinkled it right down on the bees in the frames. He referred to it as emergency feeding when they're in trouble.

    If it's warm enough to open the hive and do this quickly without damaging the bees, (and what temp would that be, incidentally?) would this work even if the weather is too cold for them to work a feeder?

    And BTW, anybody who lives in Wyoming or another windy place, I have a question: Ky is not known for its wind, but I live in a frigging wind tunnel. Where I am, the wind just blows all the time. Some strange microclimate thing I guess. All the advice says don't work on a windy day. Well, if I don't, I'll never work the bees. What do you guys do who live in perpetually windy places?

    KyBee

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Alpine, NY (near Cayuga Lake)
    Posts
    107

    Post

    I'm not in a perpetually windy place, but my suggestion is--a wind break. A natural one, if you've got it (I have a little maple grove on the windy side) or a fence if you need to.

    It'll make life easier for both you and the bees!
    Lesli<br /> <a href=\"http://beeyard.blogspot.com/\" target=\"_blank\">http://beeyard.blogspot.com/</a>

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,827

    Post

    If it's not warm enough for them to feed, then it's too early to stimulate. When it warms up they will take it.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Round Top, New York - Northern Catskill Mtns.
    Posts
    1,895

    Post

    Are the hives wrapped?
    A simple black felt paper wrap will make a significant difference in solar gain this time of year.
    Bag or hive top feeders require the bees to break up and move above the top bars. Something they can be reluctant to do when it is cold.

    Jar feeders placed on the top bars, allows the cluster to move and feed as a group.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Harriman, Tn
    Posts
    175

    Post

    Kybee,

    Im just south of you, in knoxville tn I plant a natural wind brake using blackberrys This gives them a natural place to get food when In bloom and some nice sweet berry's to eat later [img]smile.gif[/img]

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