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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    I've got a few hives that are really going nuts- they're comprised of 2 deeps (second deeps added 2 weeks ago and they're 90% drawn) and a shallow super full of honey. I just added medium supers and in no time at all they were full of bees. It will be drawn in no time at the rate their going.

    These hives are obviously going to be big honey producers, which is what I want.. if they don't swarm (which is a tendancy with Carniolans I'm told). Is it too late in the season (Maine) to split them and still expect full-sized hives by early fall?

    George-
    Dulcius ex asperis

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Charleston, WV
    Posts
    172

    Post

    I have split at the end of August and had them survive but I had to feed them like crazy and I am in TN. I have no idea what would happen up your way as your winters are earlier and harsher. I have had good luck though I am sure my splits were not ideally timed either. Good luck on whatever you do!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Milton, Vermont
    Posts
    307

    Post

    You could probably split them now and get them through the winter if you feed them heavy, but you won't get strong hives by the goldenrod flow if that is what you are hoping. You are better off to keep your hives strong as they are now and split in the spring if honey production is your goal.
    It is what it is.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    2,561

    Post

    Seems to me that if you're concerend about them swarming and there's a big flow right now then its not too late to split. Michael Bush has referenced the cut-down split many times here which, if done properly, should not reduce your honey production. You may even get lucky and find some ripe queen cells. Seems like you have little to loose and more to gain.
    Horseshoe Point Honey -- http://localvahoney.com/

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    233

    Post

    just make sure they have syrup [55 gallon drum, atleast. [img]smile.gif[/img] ] and are treated (correctly and effective-like)
    \"You\'ve got to stop beating up your women because you can\'t find a job, because you didn\'t want to get an education and now you\'re (earning) minimum wage.\"<br /><br />-Bill Cosby

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    Sigh, it seems like a cut-down split is all about timing (of a honey flow) and I have no idea, this being my first year beekeeping, what to expect for honey flows or when to expect them. It sure seems like there's something going on now, and the mid-August and September weeds (goldenrod, aster) are supposed to be big but without any experience in this regard, I don't know what to think.

    So I think I'll put off the decision for a few days, see how busy the bees are on the new medium I put on, and get busy putting supers on my other hives- I'll make a decision about splitting when I've been able to talk to more local beekeepers. If I put it off long enough, I won't have to make one [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Thanks for the input folks,

    George-
    --------------------------------
    George & Nancy Fergusson
    Sweet Time Apiary
    Whitefield Maine
    http://www.sweettimeapiary.com/
    Dulcius ex asperis

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Wyoming MN
    Posts
    406

    Post

    Just keep giving them supers. You will have more drawn comb for next year, which will give you a head start. If this is your first year, and especially if these were package bees, just let them keep building. If they winter over well, I would probably try to do a split from them in the spring, and maybe try to raise a few queens from them. Splitting now could set both hives back.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    2,561

    Post

    Sorry, I didn't realize that this was your first year. Yes, it's all about timing and if you have little reference then its probably best to sit back observe and take good records so that next year you'll have more confidence. However, I did see on your website (if the picture is representative of your apiary) you have more than 20 hives. If your objective is to make some increases, surely with this many hives you have the resources to pull off a few splits now and have nearly no impact on production or wintering.

    If you're still uncertain, then maybe you should talk to some local beekeepers to get a better understanding on what is possible in your area.

    Good luck.
    Horseshoe Point Honey -- http://localvahoney.com/

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,946

    Post

    A cut down split, here, would have been useful about the last day of May. It wouldn't be useful here, now. And probably not in Maine either.

    It's likely you can split and build it up by winter, if you feed during any dearths and the feeding doesn't set off robbing. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    You can always recombine if they don't.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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