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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Lyndon, KS
    Posts
    353

    Post

    Well, I had a friend that had what he discribed as a large hive in the walls of an old boxcar......well, it was three hives......I had made a bee vac out of a small vacume and 5 gallon buckets......the first removal we did not use it much and cut brood comb and used it by rubberbanding it into frames the honey we threw in a bucket......we think we got the queen as after all the hive was cut out and we swept bees into the box with the comb they settled in quite nicely....the second hive we used the bee vac on and it would squish them in the bucket and hose.......I use clear 1 1/4" tubing for the sucker line....you could hear them thumping in the bucket bottom.....I had the vent relief about half open and was sucking them in kinda fast though......we did find the queen and put her in the hive by gently nudging her in........but I don't know if she made it or not........the last hive was HUGE........we took two 5 gallon buckets of honey out of it it was 3 feet wide and at least 4 feet tall with LOTS of bees.........they got real mad (black german bees)..........I was wearing my new top with vail I got off of the for sale section and I could not be happier....they did get me through my jeans though about 25 times because each time I bent over it pulled tight.......so my question is how much suction do you use on a bee vac??????? all in all a GREAT fun day and I learned alot about bee removal



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    You have to stop and smell the roses......but please watch out for my bees.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,313

    Post

    I've had the same problem with vacuums. One suggestion, that I haven't tried, is to put crumpled paper in the bottom of the bucket. Always adjust so it just barely picks up the bees, otherwise they will get squished.

    I prefer to use a cone and then sweep off the bees and haul them home for a couple of days to depopulate the hives and then do a cut out. A lot less bees to deal with and I don't have to kill them with a vacuum.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,793

    Post

    I put a piece of foam rubber in the bottom, and use very little suction. Vaccuuming bees is not something you do fast. I lose very few if I go slow.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Lyndon, KS
    Posts
    353

    Post

    Does anybody try to get the brood comb or do you get just the bees.....seems like when I cut the comb I got alot of nector and honey on the good brood com and it ruined it....

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    You have to stop and smell the roses......but please watch out for my bees.

    [This message has been edited by Flewster (edited June 13, 2004).]

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,313

    Post

    I always try to save all the brood that I can. I never try to save any honey comb because it won't stay in the frames (other than putting it in a bucket and draining it later or feeding it to the bees)

    But that depends on the situation.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    hermiston, oregon
    Posts
    458

    Post

    I take the comb and bees. I then process the honey out of the comb and then process the beeswax(since the local bee supply store gives a $2.50/pound store credit for the wax).

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