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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Arnold, Peoples Republik of Maryland
    Posts
    31

    Post

    >I was thinking of buying my first packages from Mr. Miller. Have you gotten bees from him before? Do you have any recommendations? I'd prefer to buy local and avoid the shipping costs for everything.

    Kai,

    When I first met Dennis Miller I had already ordered my first packages from Rick Derrick & Sharon Songer at Free State Bees in Galesville. Rick drives down south every spring and brings back pre-ordered packages. Since then I've mail-ordered a queen from Rossman Apiaries in GA. Haven't decided yet what I'm doing next spring. Rick & Sharon may actually be the closest to you at least of those listed at the MSBA site:
    http://iaa.umd.edu/mdbee/mdbee.html

    Rick also teaches hive construction at the Anne Arundel Co. beekeeping course in the spring.

    There also appears to be a club in southern MD (Calvert Co.?) You may want to check in with them if you haven't already:
    http://gworrell.freeyellow.com/asmb.html

    Good luck!
    Bill

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Drums, PA, USA
    Posts
    331

    Post

    I only paint the outside, use the cheapest paint I can get, usually latex though. I build boxes from air dried hemlock, cut at a local sawmill. And like Michael, never seem to get the rim painted right! Also, I like different colors too!


    ------------------
    Dale Richards
    Dal-Col Apiaries
    Drums, PA

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    N. Huntingdon, PA usa
    Posts
    10

    Post

    Never paint the inside of your boxes,waste of time and bees will not produce well, also never paint your hives "red", because bees can't see the color red and will have problems finding the right hive to return to.They do recognize shapes though.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    5,041

    Post

    I stained a hive red and it was the biggest producer in the apairy that year. The red stain has held up real well also. Be careful when making authoritative assertions about beekeeping, the bees will prove you wrong every time. What works well for one person in one place one time or more, might not work at all for the next person somewhere else.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    crown point, NY, USA
    Posts
    971

    Post

    I have alot of red boxes and find that the bees have no problems with them.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    crown point, NY, USA
    Posts
    971

    Post

    hey this won't let me edit!

    [This message has been edited by Clayton (edited December 05, 2003).]

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,763

    Post

    >also never paint your hives "red", because bees can't see the color red and will have problems finding the right hive to return to.They do recognize shapes though.

    Why would they have trouble? I have a friend who can't distinguish blue from brown, but he can still find his brown house. If the hive is red it won't be invisible, it just won't be distiguishable from some other colors. I have several boxes that are red and never noticed any difference.

    Most of my hives have always been white and there were no distingishing marks but the bees always found the right hive and I'm certain they couldn't tell any difference in color since they all were painted out of the same can. It's true if I moved the hive on one end somewhere else, all the bees in the row would be confused for a few hours, so I think they homed in on thier hive by counting from the end.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    mn, wi, tx
    Posts
    174

    Post

    I have many bottom-boards painted red, the bees have no problem with red.

  9. #29

    Cool

    had to say just one thing about a post about red paint and bees don't see red. I been in this beekeeping longer then most people and to make a statement like that is little strange I run several hundred nuc's and hives of all colors.
    bees find there way by color and magnitic lines never had bes get lost from red hives and all colors seen to be equal in amount of bees finding there way to right hive.
    hope all not laffing as much as me.
    JUST HAD TO SAY SOMETHING
    Don

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Bartonville, TX USA
    Posts
    456

    Post

    So why don't we paint our names on the hives in a transparent but ultraviolet paint. The bees could see it easily, thieves could not. You could train your bees to recognize your 'brand'. (brand awareness)

    An ultraviolet spotlight could pick up stolen hives from a distance.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,763

    Post

    >So why don't we paint our names on the hives in a transparent but ultraviolet paint. The bees could see it easily, thieves could not. You could train your bees to recognize your 'brand'. (brand awareness)
    >An ultraviolet spotlight could pick up stolen hives from a distance.

    Not a bad idea, but I think the purpose of branding is to not have them stolen in the first place because the theives KNOW you can ID your hives and the Sheriff can ID them from just looking at them.

    But it might keep the bees from wandering into other peoples hives.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,361

    Post

    Joe Traynor is distributing a few micro-chips to beekeepers that he contracts with for almond pollination.These are the same ones used to identify stolen pets and livestock.They can be hidden in a frame.Signs are put up advising potential thieves that the hives are permanently identified by AVID microchips.The chips cost 2.70 each in lots of 25 but may be obsolete next year when mass production of a paper thin chip for use by stores begins.The cost should drop to pennies each.(This info taken from 12/03 ABJ.)A lot of hives were stolen last year in Cal. so look for increased use of this technology.I am probably going to get some.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,361

    Post

    Well whaduhyaknow here is the info right here on Beesource: http://www.beesource.com/point-of-vi...tober-25-2003/
    Last edited by Barry; 07-31-2014 at 08:39 PM. Reason: update link

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,660

    Default Re: PAINTING HIVE BOXES

    Quote Originally Posted by loggermike View Post
    Joe Traynor is distributing a few micro-chips to beekeepers that he contracts with for almond pollination.These are the same ones used to identify stolen pets and livestock.They can be hidden in a frame.
    This might be a real option - https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/t...vice-ever#home
    Last edited by Barry; 08-01-2014 at 06:17 AM.
    Regards, Barry

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Quezon City, Philippines
    Posts
    50

    Default Re: PAINTING HIVE BOXES

    Quote Originally Posted by fat/beeman View Post
    ... most painter's have left over paint and would be glade to give it away I also get most of my plywood free from building sites for tops and bottoms.
    happy free beeies
    Don
    Hi Don,
    How long does your plywood boxes last if you don't mind. By the way love your videos!

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Florence, Mississippi, USA
    Posts
    49

    Default Re: PAINTING HIVE BOXES

    I think Barry has been hacked!
    2013 - 1 hive. Slow buildup, succumbed to small hive beetles.
    2014 -2nd try - 8 packages this year - 2 june nucs.

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