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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Lake Linden,Michigan USA
    Posts
    52

    Post

    I'M JUST STARTING OUT IN THIS HOBBY & AM BUILDING MY SUPERS. DO I PAINT THE INSIDE OF THE BOXES ALSO, AND IF SO, WHICH TYPE OF PAINT IS PREFERED( LATEX OR OIL BASED) THANKS.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Lexington, KY, USA
    Posts
    504

    Post

    Hi,
    I have built some supers, bottom boards, feeders, inner covers etc. The supers I painted on the outside with a white latex primer and then used latex house paint I had aroung here. The inner covers I tried with boiled linseed oil and the bees don't seem to mind. I think it important though to use "boiled" linseed oil because I read that the other has some toxicity. I think that I will use linseed oil on the inside of the next supers and latex on the outside next time. The inside of the Miller feeder is coated with Fiberglass Resin. Resin only and that seems to do a good job of keeping the seals for the syrup. Hope this gives you some ideas.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,579

    Post

    No, I don't paint the inside of the supers. It allows the wood to breath a bit. The bees prefer wood sides to painted sides. They will coat it with propolis anyway.

    Ian

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    crown point, NY, USA
    Posts
    971

    Post

    I paint only the outsides. I use primer and latex paint in the color of what I can get the best deal on. Sometimes I use just several coats of latex and skip the primer depends on the funds and what I have at the time. I am thinking of trying deck paint. What ever you use make sure there has been no insecticides added.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,356

    Post

    I agree with all the above.100% acrylic latex, on the outside only.Light colors if your summers are hot,otherwise whatever colors of quality paint you can get a good deal on.I have given up on oil based paints.They take too long to dry and even the best quality didnt hold up for me.I like to mix various colors in a 5 gallon bucket and spray paint if doing a bunch otherwise a brush is fine.My mixing usually turns up shades of grey,but one batch turned out pink,and I have been getting ribbed about the pretty pink hives.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,740

    Post

    As everyone above says, only paint the outside.

    If you REALLY want to protect the whole hive, you make a dipping/melting tank and use parafin and gum resin and dip the boxes. I've never done it but everyone who does it loves it.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Pomfret, MD, USA
    Posts
    242

    Post

    Newbie here...Per instructions from several books I coated my boxes inside and out with copper napthanate, which is a wood preserver. It turned the boxes a light green... Should I still paint them, or can I leave them unpainted? I live in Washington D.C. area, our summers are hot and humid...

    Thanks,
    Kai

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Spruce Pine, North Carolina
    Posts
    21

    Post

    For you guys who like to use latex paint.
    Stack your wooden ware about head high and use a paint roller.
    Much faster then a brush.

    JB

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,740

    Post

    >Newbie here...Per instructions from several books I coated my boxes inside and out with copper napthanate, which is a wood preserver. It turned the boxes a light green... Should I still paint them, or can I leave them unpainted?

    I consider a hive to be a food container. I have doubts about painting the inside of a hive with anything I wouldn't chew or eat. Copper Napthanate is not in that category.

    Personally, I wouldn't put CN any on a hive and if I inherited any with it on them, I would probably use them for kindling. But that's just me.

    Since you probably aren't going to do that, I don't know what would be better. I suppose you could paint them inside to try to keep the Copper Napthanate away from the bees.

    I do know that CCA kills bees. CCA (copper chrome arsenic) is about 35% copper sulphate, 45% sodium or potassium dichromate, and 20% arsenic pentoxide. The arsenic protects the timber against insects (apparently including bees), while the copper protects it against fungi. The chromium is there to help the arsenic and copper bond with the wood.

    None of the bee scientists I asked could say how much of this is because of the copper or how much is because of the arsenic but apparently the arsenic was added to be an insecticide.

    Copper Napthanate is listed as being a mammal repellent and a fungicide. Since they don't list any insecticide properties, perhaps it's not deadly to bees as the CCA is.
    http://www.alanwood.net/pesticides/c...phthenate.html

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

    Post

    Thanks for the tip about stacking and rolling the paint on. Everything I read said not to paint the inside with anything. I get my paint from Lowe's and Home Depot miss match paint pile. I have a few pink hives bodies that will go into service in the spring. I toned it down by mixing light grey in with that bright light pink. They are still pink just not bright. Why pay $15-$20 a gallon when you can get the same paint for $5 a gallon. We have hot summers so I only pick the light colors. My hives are eggshell(very light grey) with different color BBs and TCs(one has a sea foam green set the other a darker grey set). Even if bees are color blind as some say the shade difference should be enough to guide them home. Do you paint your hives different colors or paterns to reduce drifting?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lake county, Indiana 46408-4109
    Posts
    3,543

    Post

    I was at a meeting abiut 4 years ago and the speeker was Dr. Bill Wilson ( retired from a bee lab dont know witch one ) and he sugested painting the inside of the boxes to seal any cracks that the SHB coule lay her eggs in so it depends who you ask!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,740

    Post

    I stack mine and roll it on. I SHOULD paint the rim, but I never seem to get it done very often.

    I have a variety of colors. I bought a bunch of boxes that were already an assortment of colors and then when my nephew was here and wanted something to do, he painted a bunch of boxes with whatever was around. Since I often paint tipis nice bright colors, what was around was bright red and bright blue.

    So I can't say I did it on purpose, but I have quite a rainbow of box colors.

    I've been buying the nuetral exterior latex with no pigment in it. Makes a nice clear finish. I used it last spring for the first time, so I can't say how it will do in the long run.

    I have hive bodies, painted on the outside, and the rim (but not the inside), that I put into service 30 years ago. They are toward the end of their life, but they are still in use. The wood is a bit punky and there are some rotten spots in splits that the bees can get in and out of now. Frankly I think the bees like old wood better anyway.

    Of course the humidity where you live would have an affect. I had these in Western Nebraska and Colorado and Wyoming as well as Eastern Nebraska. All those western locations are an average of about 20% humidity and often lower. Here in Eastern Nebraska it is MUCH more humid than there, but still not nearly as humid as a coastal or lake area.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,837

    Post

    Greetings . . .

    Silathane Alkyd Semi-gloss Enamel, a product of Bruning Paint Co., Baltimore, MD

    Recommended for "primed galvanized metal". "Ideal for machinery, tanks, equipment and vehicles under extreame weather
    conditions
    .
    Meets USDA criteria for use in federally inspected meat and poultry plants".
    Sales lit. says its approved for "food contact".

    When I painted my hives, they dried to-touch in about 4 hrs, but required about a week to harden.

    ------------------
    Dave W . . .

    A NewBEE with 1 hive.
    First package installed
    April, 2003.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    mountain home, ar, usa
    Posts
    378

    Post

    Like MB, I use a clear "base" laxtex paint. Walmart sells an exterior paint (McCloskey 7477 Accent Base) that is usually mixed with color, but I just tell them not to- it'll always get a raised eyebrow! I've used it for four years and still have good protection... I just love the natural look of wood. And it blends better in the woods discouraging vandalism and neighbors frowning (cause you can't really see them). Much more scenic than the vomit look of most apiaries:}

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,740

    Post

    It's funny, but I was already kind of hesitant to paint those nice wood boxes and then I tried to buy white paint and accidently got home with two gallons of the neutral base. And I thought, maybe this is what I really want anyway. So I used it and liked it. But it was really an accident.

    I have some boxes now that I haven't painted at all. I'm wondering if they will not last just as long or maybe longer without the paint. When you have a constant source of humidity inside, maybe it would be better if it can evaporate to the outside?


  16. #16
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
    Posts
    1,966

    Post

    How about this for another reason to paint inside. I burned the frames from 5 hives that had foulbrood this year. I charred the boxes and intend to reuse them. JUST IN CASE, I've thought about some kind of paint to cover any possible sites for reinfection. I haven't actually decided to do this yet. Any reactions?

    Dick Marron

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,740

    Post

    There are people who do paint them, so why not? I'd use a nice exterior latex and let it air out well. I'm guessing that the house bees who would have covered it with propolis wouldn't be feeding the young anyway, but it couldn't hurt under your circumstances.

    But routinely, I wouldn't.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Arnold, Peoples Republik of Maryland
    Posts
    31

    Post

    >Newbie here...Per instructions from several books I coated my boxes inside and out with copper napthanate, which is a wood preserver. It turned the boxes a light green... Should I still paint them, or can I leave them unpainted? I live in Washington D.C. area, our summers are hot and humid...

    Hi Kai,

    I had the same concerns about the humidity. I tried going with a natural-color wood stain (was trying to make my hives less obvious) followed with 2 or 3 coats of clear polyurethane (including the mating surfaces). Too early to tell yet, but so far so good.

    BTW, I've been getting most of my woodenware from Dennis Miller up in east Baltimore. Makes everything himself and seems to be good quality. Do you have a local supplier down your way?

    Bill

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Pomfret, MD, USA
    Posts
    242

    Post

    Bill,
    Yeah, I have been thinking about buying the rest of the woodenware I need from Mr. Miller. Down here in La Plata there doesn't seem to be anyone who sells it. I've asked a few of the Amish wood workers but no one is interested, probably because it's such a small amount. At this point all I really need are frames and some inner covers.

    I was thinking of buying my first packages from Mr. Miller. Have you gotten bees from him before? Do you have any recommendations? I'd prefer to buy local and avoid the shipping costs for everything.

    Thanks,
    Kai

  20. #20
    hi all being as frugel as one can bee what I use is any color that I get for free mostly latex and some oil base.
    I never paint inside boxes but do paint bottoms as there very easy o spot shb's if you get them.
    my cost for paint is free or just give a painter some honey. most painter's have left over paint and would be glade to give it away I also get most of my plywood free from building sites for tops and bottoms.
    happy free beeies
    Don

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