Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: bee feeder

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    hermiston, oregon
    Posts
    458

    Post

    I just bought a doolite beefeeder(the type that replaces a frame) from a supplier about 3 hours away. After looking at it Im not very sure how this thing works. It has (2) blocks stapled into the top of the feeder and a thin board that runs the length of the feeder. I can only assume that this board will float on the syrup mixture and gives the bees a place to land without drowning.

    Any one have any experience with this kinda of feeder and can help me out?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,940

    Post

    >I just bought a doolite beefeeder(the type that replaces a frame) from a supplier about 3 hours away.

    I haven't heard it called that in decades! Usually it's called a division board feeder, but your terminology is fine too.

    >After looking at it Im not very sure how this thing works. It has (2) blocks stapled into the top of the feeder and a thin board that runs the length of the feeder. I can only assume that this board will float on the syrup mixture and gives the bees a place to land without drowning.

    I was toing to say it DOESN'T work, but yours seems to be set up as it needs to be in order to work. A screen ladder would help too, but the essentials are it needs the blocks at the top to keep it from spreading and taking up several frames and it needs the float to keep them from drowning. Is it made of wood or masonite or plastic?

    >Any one have any experience with this kinda of feeder and can help me out?

    There are many variations of how to make it work. Your's has the blocks to hold the top in and the float. A ladder would be helpful. No matter what you do some bees drown in it, but with a float and/or a ladder they are usable. Just pull the outside frame out and put in the feeder. If it's an old masonite or wood one it will take just one frame's space. If it's the new plastic ones then it may take more. And fill it with syrup.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    hermiston, oregon
    Posts
    458

    Post

    MB... I really appreciate all the time you invest in answering all the questions. You are a wealth of information...

    Can you describe this screen ladder a bit more so I can construct one.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,940

    Post

    It's hard to picture exactly what your feeder looks like. When I have the plastic ones I cut a piece of #8 hardware cloth that folds so it goes all the way to the bottom across the bottom and up both sides so the inside (except for the ends) is covered with the hardware cloth that acts as a ladder. When I have the masonite and wood ones from Brushy Mt, they already have a piece of #8 hardware cloth that is like a column in the middle of the feeder. The ends of the top of the feeder are blocked by the wood (like a top bar) that the sides are nailed to.

    The principles are that the hardware cloth gives them something to climb up and down on without falling in. Just make sure the hardware cloth doesn't make a space they can crawl under or behind and get trapped anywhere.

    The float gives them something to get on in the middle if they fall in and something to land on to drink the syrup.

    You'll just have to adapt the idea to what your feeder looks like.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads