Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Jason G in Tennessee Guest

    Question

    Hi, I have read somewhere before that bees that do not come out of their cells and have their tongues sticking out is a sign of some problem, but I cannot remember what. Their head barely protrudes out of the cell, but instead of coming out and joining the other bees to begin work they remain motionless in their cells.
    Please help me remember what it is.
    Thanks,
    JG

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Round Top, New York - Northern Catskill Mtns.
    Posts
    1,895

    Post

    From your description is sounds like the bee is fully develop and intack. It has started to chew it's way out of the cell, but has not completed the task.
    If this is the case there are a few things that come to mind. The cells may have been short of provisions when capped and these bees were looking for food and they may no have gotten it.
    This time of year, with weather conditions changing and the brood nest growing in size, sometimes brood get negelated.
    Feeding is one of the first things a newly emerging bee does.

    If the cells had bodies that were "melted" down into a pool in the bottom of the cell, with the tongue protruding up, American Foulbrood would be the likely cause.

  3. #3
    Jason G in Tennessee Guest

    Post

    Yes, fully developed as far as I can see with the head sticking out. She has been there for several days and the bees are not removing her. Her head protrudes out and her tongue is completely extended. There have been two or three like this and she is the only one left. It seems like the bees are having difficulty coming out of their cells and taking much time to do so.
    THANKS,
    Jason

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Round Top, New York - Northern Catskill Mtns.
    Posts
    1,895

    Post

    I do not know of any bee diseases that would cause the condition that is described. All of the brood diseases cause death before they are ready to emerge.
    My guess would be they got chilled, or not feed, or a combination with early spring conditions.
    You may also want to check any of these bees still in their cells for mites, as they may have been weakened to the point they may have required help to emerge.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads