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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Merrimack, NH
    Posts
    159

    Post

    ok i have at home an old craftsman tablesaw which is about 15 years old which i plan on replacing now that i want to build hives.

    i purchased my initial few hives to get started quickly but still have plans to build many other pieces such as: feeders, fancy sbb, frames, pollen traps, condo hives, etc.

    1) what are the must have "stand up" power tools to accomplish the above?

    2) what size, type and preferred brand?

    3) what are the nice to have tools?



    ------------------
    NH Beekeeper

    ** Have you seen BeeBlogs.com ?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    >1) what are the must have "stand up" power tools to accomplish the above?

    I have three power tools that I use the most.
    Craftsman 10" tablesaw
    Craftsman benchtop drill press
    Craftsman 18.2v portable drill

    >2) what size, type and preferred brand?

    See above

    >3) what are the nice to have tools?

    Adjustable furniture (wood) clamps.
    IF you make frames, (I don't) a power stapler and/or nail gun.
    Wagner power painter if you have a lot of painting to do.

    I haven't found anything that I could not make with the tablesaw, and a power driver. The benchtop drillpress is useful if you want to predrill, glue and screw you boxes as I do. If you just want to nail them you won't need it. I got by with the hand drill for a long time. I also find that the Wagner takes more time to clean than time useing it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    North Hills, CA USA
    Posts
    453

    Post

    If that Craftsman table saw is a 10" saw, cast iron table and belt driven then keep it. If not keep it anyway. It can be used for other setups when you don't want to change setings on main saw. It is realy nice to have a large table top that you can rip a 14" or so on ether side of the blade. A 75 tooth or so carbide blade and a adjustable (wobble) dado blade, both sized to fit table saw. A circular saw to cut long lengths down to handle safely on table saw.
    A palm sander. Any other power tool that you think you will need,wait untill you realy think you need it. You probably will not. I have other power tools but the above tools are what I use over and over for bee equipment. For years I looked at the adds on a palm nailer. Last summer I found a sale on a imported one it was a knock off of the US one. I wish I had bought the tool 20 years ago as there are about 45 8D nails to drive in a deep hive box, oh yes it is air driven.
    Walt

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
    Posts
    1,914

    Post

    I mostly just use Papa's old craftsman tablesaw and occassionally his cordless drill.I think that the right jig can be as important as the right tool. I made the "frame assembly jig" from this website and love it! I use an electric stapler/bradder for inserting foundation and placing screen material.

    Last tip, I always use primer under my paint.

  5. #5

    Post

    For tool reviews you should check out the magazine Fine Homebuilding or consumers reports. They review tools at least once a year. Fine Homebuilding will probably have back issues for sale, published by Taunton Press.

    I'd say a good hammer. A frame building jig from WTK. An air compressor. Frame nailing device if you use wax foundation. I used to paint with my compressor but stacking the boxes up and using a roller has been more efficient.

    Have you checked out Humble Abodes prices on woodenware? If I lived up your way that is where I would get my boxes and frames from.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Merrimack, NH
    Posts
    159

    Post

    if you could give me Humble adobe's contact info that would be greatly appreciated

    thanks

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
    Posts
    1,966

    Post

    I have a 40 year old Craftsman. It is now dedicted to dado work. Even a good dado blade is a pain to take out and put in. I have a better 10" table saw for a workhorse. I made the frame jigs and love them. I also made a simple jig to hold hive bodies square when nailing or screwing. I use a screw gun to put a few screws in and nail the rest. I stack up supers and paint with a roller: Primer + 2 coats of Acrylic Latex. I have a drill press but wouldn't buy one just for hives. I make all my sbbs , lids and miller feeders. The rest I buy and assemble.

    Hope this helps,

    Dickm

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    tulsa, ok usa
    Posts
    2,264

    Post

    Well it all depends upon how much money you have to spend, but here are my thoughts.

    Back in New Orleans when I was in my late teens I did some woodworking. I was into fine woodworking and made a number of items in mahogany. The tools I owned needed to be multifunctional because of a limited budget. The tools I selected then are not the tools I selected recently when I got back into woodworking.

    First and foremost you need a table saw. This is truly the most versatile tool in any shop. With a few jigs, purchased or homemade, you can make any joint used on a hive. You will be able to make your rabbit, box or finger joints, and even hand holds. This is the one tool you don’t want to be cheap on. Avoid Harbor Freight for this item. I have a Delta contractor's saw with Unifence. I like this saw because it comes with a large table the only change I would make would be the fence. I would have liked to have had a Biesemeyer fence because it is easier to clamp to and make jigs that fit right over it. http://www.deltawoodworking.com/index.asp?e=136&p=4742

    The two brands in contractor table saws I like are Delta and Jet for a variety of reasons. The tables are usually true and flat. The T-slots are machined accurately so you miter slides true and doesn’t have any excess play. They both are very heavy and weight keeps vibration down. The tables are also relatively deep and that makes it easier to rip long boards straight. With tabletop and small saws the fence may extend only a few inches before the blade and this increases the chance of binding when ripping boards.

    You also need to have a saw with an extended table. This will allow you to rip a sheet of plywood down the middle. The other nice feature with an extended table you can add a router and make it a router table. The one jig that few people make and is one of the easier one to make is a sliding tabletop. With this jig you can cross cut long boards. I have two powered handsaws and do not use them at all when making hives.

    You will also need a dado blade. I would get a traditional stack and not a wobble blade. The stack type will give you a flat cut while the wobble will be slightly rounded. While this is not that important to hives, you might end up making something like bookshelves where it may matter to you. Also with a stack dado you can reproduce the exact dado width many months latter. For this Item I would go to Harbor Freight. You can pickup them up on sale for as little as $19.95 and freight is very affordable. The inexpensive freight is the US Mail and can be very very slow.

    Two or three roller stands can be very useful if you work by yourself. Harbor Fright item 46074 around $9 each on sale.

    If you are going to cross cut long boards without a helper you need to make a roller stand to support the end of the board. Go to K-mart and buy some ball bearings for roller skates. Bolt these on the sides of a 2 by 4 like an inline skate. The end of the board can slide on these while you use the sliding table.

    I would also get a cordless drill and get a bench top drill press. My cordless is a Dewalt and my drill press was one on sale at Harbor Freight for $39. You will also need to get a counter sink drill bit if you are going to screw the bodies. The counter sink bit keeps the wood fibers from splitting and thus extends the life of the hive. A counter sink bit will run around 6 to 8 dollars.

    If you are going to assemble a lot of wooden frames I would consider a nail gun and small compressor from Harbor Freight when they go on sale. They go on sale every 4 to 6 weeks these two items should set you back around ninety to one hundred dollars. It takes a patient man to assemble fifty frames (two hive bodies and three suppers) with a hammer and nail.

    As you probably realize I don’t think it is wise to skimp on the table saw. Spend your money there because that tool can do so much if it is good. A good tool will not make a good woodworker out of a bad one but it can make a fair woodworker into a good one. Also if the tools is easier to use it will be more enjoyable.

    Hope this helps. These are the tools that I would get and everyone has their own opinion what is best. So I am sure you will get lots of recommendation.


    [This message has been edited by magnet-man (edited November 13, 2004).]

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    >if you could give me Humble adobe's contact info that would be greatly appreciated

    If you are going to buy your boxes, you can not make them, including shipping, for less than Browning Cut Stock prices. Shipping is not bad for forty or more, delivered by truck on a pallet.

    I like their finger joints better than the type cut by Humble Adobes.

    Browning Cut Stock
    1571 Hwy. 3
    Juliaetta, Id 83535
    208.276.3494


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,320

    Post

    1) Rockwell 10" table saw
    2) Dewalt 10" radial arm saw
    3) stackable dado blades (don't skimp here)

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    tulsa, ok usa
    Posts
    2,264

    Post

    Dado blades can run from $19.95 to over $350. If the dado blade is only going to be for hive and unfinished work than an inexpensive blade will do. I do not use my $150 Freud dado set to make hives. I use my inexpensive Harbor Freight blade for that. Good blades start at around one hundred dollars.

    A good used radial arm saw for around $100 would be a welcome addition if you have the room for it. You would not have to make a sliding table for your saw. A shaper head can also be attached to it to make molding. The radial arm saw was my first saw back in high school. I have a very health respect for them. They can be very dangerous. More people are injured on table saws only because there are more of them. Do not rip on a radial arm saw. If you buy a used Craftsman, there is a recall on the blade guard and they will replace it free. There was a real kick back danger. I know this from experience.

    [This message has been edited by magnet-man (edited November 13, 2004).]

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Porter, Ok USA
    Posts
    491

    Post

    Amen on the Kickback.

    Friend of mine ran thru the grass in Vietname for two tours and came out whole. Came back and went to work for a contractor and lost an eye when a tablesaw threw a sliver of wood back at him.

    Be careful and make a good OLD man.

  13. #13

    Post

    Humble Abodes
    Windsor Maine
    email humbleabodes@prexar.com
    1-877-423-3269
    They treated me well. Took care of problems. Except for shipping costs I would still buy from them.

    I called Browning once because I saw great prices. I think they laughed at me when I tried to order from them because of HIGH shipping costs. I don't remember the specifics though.


  14. #14

    Post

    In my shop the things that I use for bee equipment is a small craftsman table saw, Craftsman radial arm saw, drill press, air compressor and stapler for frames. I don't have a nail gun yet but I am looking to get one. I also have a router that I use when I am rebuilding old equipment and the frame rest needs replaced.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Merrimack, NH
    Posts
    159

    Post

    thanks for all the tips some good stuff here.

    i am suprised no jig saw magnet-man to cut those fancy "shapes" to lead the bees onto the correct landing board

    any suggestions for central dust collecting system.

    how do the suppliers cut those corner joints on the boxes? do they use a jig and router like i have seen just seems like so much work.



    ------------------
    NH Beekeeper

    ** Have you seen BeeBlogs.com ?

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    >how do the suppliers cut those corner joints on the boxes?

    Don't know how the big boys do it, but here is a good way for you to do it.
    http://www.beesource.com/plans/boxjoint/index1.htm

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    tulsa, ok usa
    Posts
    2,264

    Post

    Well New Hampshire Beekeeper I do have a jig saw but I don’t use it to make hives. By fancy landing boards I guess you are referencing me painting my landing board on my small bee house? I did finally see a bee cross the color line.

    As far as a dust collection system, that all depends upon money. I have my saw mounted on wheels and I can roll it outside if I want to. Saves lots of clean up. There are the shop vac type and they are loud. Then you have the impeller systems that are low suction but higher volume and those are nice because they are quite. If I had the extra money I would get the impeller system because of the noise. A used shop-vac and a big old garbage can is pretty cheap though.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    mountain home, ar, usa
    Posts
    378

    Post

    I've got a tablesaw, which is a must for beekeeper woodworking, but I also couldn't make it without my Delta planer. I use some smoke-damaged oak which i got for free, and also pallet wood for my sbb's, etc. I use the heck out of my planer to get the wood clean and smooth. I use a sawsall to cut the nails from pallets, before planing and cutting the pallet wood (only oak or hickory).

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Lima, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    720

    Post

    Most used... Tablesaw followed by the air compressor (with staple gun). Make sure you get one that can handle a dado blade. I build most everything on my cheap 10" craftsman including salvaging pallet wood. One day I'll upgrade to a better table saw (unisaw or better), but it's not a priority or necessary for building beekeeping equipment.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Merrimack, NH
    Posts
    159

    Post

    curry what model planer do you have?

    ok what might a uni-saw be?

    using pallets for wood hmmm never thought of that?

    magnet-man i was talking about your thread regarding the shapes that a bee can identify assuming that you where going to cut out wood shapes for bees to identify their hive from others? looks like i am off track


    ------------------
    NH Beekeeper

    ** Have you seen BeeBlogs.com ?

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