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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Mount Pleasant Mills PA USA
    Posts
    6

    Post

    I will be starting hives this spring. I am trying to make the most of my budget, and there's an option I am considering that would save cost, but I don't want to make the decision based on that alone.

    I plan on getting all my woodenware from Drapers in PA (I'm within driving distance)and they have a spacer option for 8 frames per box. I've also read about the 9-per-box option in Beekeeing for Dummies.

    Is there a yield difference in a filled box of 8 vs 10 frames? is there more building per frame on an 8-spaced? If so, would I definitely want to use the strongest foundation, with extraction in mind?

    Is there a negative to using 8 frames instead of 10?


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Ames, Iowa
    Posts
    97

    Post

    Are you using deeps for the brood chamber? If so I think the 8 and 9 frame options are great. If you plan on using only mediums, I would not recommend starting off with 8 or 9 frames, as the frames cannot be interchanged (if using 10 for the brood chamber). I use crimp wired foundation for the frames for extracting and have no problems.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,919

    Post

    I recommend the 9 frames for bare foundation. You can use the 8 frames with empty drawn comb. You can buy the "comb" spacer and you don't have to put spacers in the boxes and can use either 8 or 9 depending on if you have drawn comb. If you put bare foundation in 8 frame configuartion in a 10 frame box they MIGHT draw it correctly and they MIGHT make a mess of it. If you put the same ones in 9 frame configuration they will ALMOST always do it correctly, at least as often as they do when it's 10 frame spacing.

    The amount of honey in the box is the same when it's full regardless of 10 frame, 9 frame or 8 frame setup. You will get more wax from the 9 or 8 frame spacing. They will be MUCH easier to uncap. If you are rasing cut comb honey, I recommend you stay with 10 frames or the comb gets too thick to fit in a comb honey box. At least too thick for some of them.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,837

    Post

    Here are some good links. Others can be found by searching "frame spacing".

    See comments by Michael Bush - posted June 05, 2003 10:49 AM http://www.beesource.com/ubb/Forum1/HTML/000579.html

    See comments by Michael Bush - posted January 16, 2003 06:58 AM http://www.beesource.com/ubb/Forum2/...475.html¬*¬*¬* ¬*
    See comments by Clayton - posted January 16, 2003 09:06 AM http://www.beesource.com/ubb/Forum2/...475.html¬*¬*¬*

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    mn, wi, tx
    Posts
    174

    Post

    If you are starting with foundation, I would encourage you to stick to 10 frames to the box, until the foundation is drawn.

    After it is fully drawn, then I like 9 frames in the brood chambers and 8 or 9 in the honey supers.

    If you try to space these out before the foundation has been drawn, you are just asking for a mess.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    >If you are starting with foundation, I would encourage you to stick to 10 frames to the box, until the foundation is drawn.
    After it is fully drawn, then I like 9 frames in the brood chambers and 8 or 9 in the honey supers.

    >If you try to space these out before the foundation has been drawn, you are just asking for a mess.


    I agree completely, but I also use Permacomb and nine frame spacing and don't have to worry about drawing any cells at all.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    crown point, NY, USA
    Posts
    971

    Post

    I'm for 9 frame in the supers (although I sometimes use 10 still). 10 frame in the brood chambers. For some reason I never cared for 8 frame as it seemed to give more problems with the bees drawing some pretty weird cross combs and such, but thats just me. I say try 8 frame and you will know if you like it.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,919

    Post

    I know there are some links above that may send you to what I think.

    I think 9 frames is nice in supers if you are extracting and don't want cut comb. If you put it in with blank foundation they wll PROBABLY build it ok. If you put in 8 frames with blank foundation they will almost NEVER built it correctly. If you put in 10 frames they will be the most likely to build it correctly.

    I don't like 9 frames in the brood chamber. I know some people do it and they seem to like it, but I see honey comb that sticks out more and brood comb that is in more and when you rearrange the brood chamber you can end up with honey protruding from both sides that run into each other, or some extra deep honey on one side that had extra shallow on the other that is now too close to some brood that can't emerge because of the extra honey. The point is that 10 frames have more flat surface of comb and I have less problems rearranging it. Also, if you decide to go with 10 frames after having 9 frames, you about have to use an uncapping knife to cut off the protruding honey comb. What a mess! But that's just my opinion.

    Also one less frame of brood in the brood chamber with 5.4mm foundation is 7000 less cells. With 4.9mm foundation it's 8400 less cells. I'd rather have three more frames in a brood chamber than one less.

    [This message has been edited by Michael Bush (edited January 15, 2004).]

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