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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Centerville,TN, USA
    Posts
    20

    Question

    is there a minimum space between hives?
    thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,985

    Post

    Nope

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

    Post

    No but if you have space I would have them at least 4 feet apart. Mine were 6 feet and had some robbing problems that was easy to stop by reducing the entrance.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,212

    Post

    I agree but I will expound a bit further. I have put them right next to each other and had no problems, but when a hive was robbing the one next door, I have moved it a couple of feet further away and had the robbing stop. So I'd say it usually doesn't matter at all, but sometimes it helps to put them a little further apart.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Centerville,TN, USA
    Posts
    20

    Post

    Thanks for the input
    am thinking of makeing a wooden stand and putting 3 hives in 16 feet.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,898

    Post

    They sell clips for mounting commercial hives on pallets, both a half inch spacing and a zero spacing. I have sixteen on a platform, two rows of eight each row, hives seperated by 1/2" each, no problems except harder to take supers on and off with that tight a spacing.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,212

    Post

    I have two treated 4 by 4s on the ground and I put four hives on 8 foot 4 by 4s. That's one every two feet.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Williston, NC, USA
    Posts
    1,779

    Post

    I space mine so I can walk between them! For my convenience, not the bees'!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Des Moines, Iowa
    Posts
    71

    Post

    What about the distance between a established hive last year and a new package installed this year? Next to each other?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

    Post

    Hi JJ

    Welcome to B source.

    I don't understand the question.......

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Des Moines, Iowa
    Posts
    71

    Post

    Sorry, I meant that I have two established hives in two different locations on a acre of ground. I am starting three new hives this year with package bees with Queens. I would like to set these three new hives beside the established hives but do not want to start a problem. How much distance should I leave between them( established hive and new hive) or can I put them side by side? Thanks

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,212

    Post

    It probably won't make any difference if you put them side by side or a half a mile away. But sometimes when they are very close and robbing has broken out, a couple of feet more seems to help. The bees will fly a very long distance to rob a weak hive.

    I would put them where it is most convenient for you.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
    Posts
    1,966

    Post

    Here's something to think about. I had 5 (of 20) hives go down with AFB. 4 of those were situated in 2 pairs about 1 foot apart. I suspect that drifting may have spread the disease more. Also, when you inspect the bees, by the time you get to the last one, the apiary my be somewhat excited. If I had it to do over I'd isolate my hives more, since I have the room.

    dickm

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    mountain home, ar, usa
    Posts
    378

    Post

    dickm,

    I'm curious... how old was the brood comb in the 5 hives with foulbrood (guesstimate)? I'm just wondering if new comb can easily get foulbrood from drifting.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
    Posts
    1,966

    Post

    I bought some nucs from a guy who was supposed to be reliable. He ended up selling me a lot of old comb. He claimed he hadn't seen a case of AFB in his yards and that he hadn't used Terra in 3 years.Live and learn. I'm going to packages from now on and am leery about them. I've come to understand that all commercial beekeepers use Terramyacin whether they need it or not, so bought bees will always come from a place where AFB has been hidden by it. It's tough if you're trying to go without chemicals, as I am.

    Dickm

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,985

    Post

    >>I've come to understand that all commercial beekeepers use Terramyacin whether they need it or not, so bought bees will always come from a place where AFB has been hidden by it. It's tough if you're trying to go without chemicals, as I am.

    Dickm, commercial beekeepers, or most other beekeeper who understands the risks of AFB use Terramyacin in there beekeeping operation for very good reason. They dont just use it wastefully or irrisponsiblely. AFB is an invasive and very distructive brood disease and if you raise bees, you have to consider the fact that AFB or EFB posess a threat to your hives.
    There is the fear of internal breakout, reason enough to medicate. But even a greater fear is out side infection to the brood disease. The spread of the disease from surrounding beeyards is the reason why most commercial operatiors med for the disease.


    Ian

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