Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    beaver dams ny
    Posts
    1

    Post

    should I eradicate the queen from a new, small (1 lb or less) feral swarm captured tonight and combine it with a 6 week old colony (also a feral capture, but primary swarm)? or should I try to preserve the genetics of the new swarm? We can get frost in early September up here.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Wyoming MN
    Posts
    406

    Smile

    It all depends....personally, if I had the equipment, I would hive them separatly. With feeding, they should do ok, and that would give you a chance to see how the queen does this year yet. Then you can decide this fall, and either winter them separate, or combine them. The other thought is that if it is an after swarm, it could be a virgin queen, so it may take awhile for the hive to get established. Sounds like a fun experiment.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Mobile, Alabama
    Posts
    536

    Post

    I would try to get the colony through the winter. I agree with Michael in that feral genetics are probably going to be helpful in overcoming our mite problems. I would try to put a swarm that small in a nuc of some kind, or use a follower in standard equipment to reduce the space that they have to take care of until they get up to speed. Goodluck with this and let us know how it pans out!

    ------------------
    Rob Koss

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,113

    Post

    Well Rob already said what I would say. He's right, I'd say I'd try to keep the feral queen unless they turn out to be mean.

    If she's old they may supercede her.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
    Posts
    7,923

    Post

    The hive I acquired last Fall was, essentially, a feral hive. It was a hive that had been left untended for at least five years out in back of a field prior to the present business owners acquiring the business. They gave the bees to me. These bees are pretty hard to handle, but I let them be because they have survived without any treatment, so I figure they have natural resistance. Even if I don't ever try to get any honey from the hive, I won't kill them unless they attack and cause actual harm. So far, they havent' shown a propensity for that behavior. They just guard their hive diligently and persistently.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads