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  1. #1
    East Texas Pine Rooter Guest

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    We had a bad wind storm here tuesday night. I was called to capture a small swarm. They had started making a hive on a limb of a pecan tree. It was about five feet off the ground, but were in a ball like a swarm. I cut the limb they were on, but noticed wax comb on a limb above. No eggs, or finished comb, because this was only 1-1/2 days after first storm. we also had a heavy storm here last night. Any how i put the swarm ball in a plastic bucket, with a 8-inch #8 screen wire lid cut into a 5-gal. plastic bucket from walmart. When I got to the farm, i put them into the shade, 2-1/2 hours later most of the bees looked liked they were dying, laying on the bottom of the bucket on there side. some were still flying at the top next to the screen. Maybe i should have left them in the pickup bed so the wind could have blown on them. i finally hived them, with #8 screen wire bottom, on a raised stand, with a top entrance. On the way to the farm, i kept them in the cab with me, with the a/c on to help keep them cool. it was near 90-degrees, with high humidity. What should I do different next time?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,113

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    If they overheat and have food, they will regurgitate honey over themselves and they will be sticky. Was this the case?

    If they are starving they will just collapse. This is possible for a swarm that hasn't found a home and was confined without food for any length of time.

    I usually try to put them in a hive with a SBB and after they are settled in and closed up I open the SBB to let air in for ventilation.

    I also have a five gallon bucket for retrievig them (A swarm retreval bucket from Brushy Mt.). I haven't left a swarm in there for any length of time yet.

  3. #3
    East Texas Pine Rooter Guest

    Post

    Michael:
    I think they were starving. They were in the process of creating a wax comb on a limb. I checked on them the next morning, and they were all dead, and ants had moved in on the carcases. The next time i go to collect a swarm, should I put a couple pieces candy in retrieval bucket to eliviate them from starving?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Rochester, Washington, USA
    Posts
    973

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    Remember they generate alot of heat, as they can maintain the hive at a constant temp of, I think, 90 degrees or something around that figure. I had purched 5 packages and couldn't work them that night so I put them in our frotn bathroom with the window open, 4hrs later I opened the door and the heat and humidity was quite high.
    I take a sprayer w/sugar water in it and spray the bees prior to removeing them. That way if they are straving they'll have something to eat and it also keeps them from flying. I also try to hive them ASAP knowing that they maybe stressed out.
    Got a swarm just this past Thurs. they were trapped in a skylight and were apparently starving, alot of dead bees under the swarm. Used a spray of 1/2 honey and 1/2 water w/ pepermint and lemongrass oils added they had to stay in the capture box overnite ,when I got them home Thurs nite I sprayed the screen on the box w/the mixture and again in the morning prior to hiveing them, I noticed that in the morning you could see them lapping the drops of the mixture off the screen. I will be checking the hive Monday morn to see how they a fairing.
    Make your a couple of screened capture boxes, or a bee vac, if you make the vac you can use the inner boxes for swarms like you discribed. Thats what I did.


    Now for a personial note ; I'd personially never use anything from Wally World near my bees, I've worked for them and know the quality of their junk


    ------------------
    'WHEN WE CLOSE OUR EYES WE ALL LOOK THE SAME' GWPW 03

    [This message has been edited by SilverFox (edited June 06, 2004).]

    [This message has been edited by SilverFox (edited June 06, 2004).]

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,113

    Post

    I've always just hived them as quickly as I could and then I usually add a frame of honey to the hive or, if I don't have a frame of honey, a feeder.

    But if you have to leave them in a box for any length of time I'd give them BOTH water AND syrup to keep them alive.

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