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Thread: Inner covers

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    NSW,Australia
    Posts
    71

    Post

    How many bee keepers use inner covers here

    Most suppliers dont sell them here

    What do you do to stop the beeps from building comb on the inside of the hive lid?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Grifton, NC
    Posts
    1,302

    Post

    I only have one hive right now, but everybody I know uses inner covers. Burr comb is not a problem. My bes just like to get in there and cool off.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    oneonta al.
    Posts
    848

    Post

    I have inner covers on some of my hives & some I don't.
    I've measured for the correct bee space.& I cannot tell that much diff- either way.
    But I like them because it keep's them from boiling in your face when you 1st remove the top.>>>>MARK

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Mobile, Alabama
    Posts
    536

    Post

    I don't use inner covers. I have had them in the past, and still have one colony that uses an inner/outer cover arrangement that I picked up when I bought a bunch of colonies from a retiring beekeeper. Frankly, I haven't detected a difference, so it's not worth the added expense to me to have them.

    ------------------
    Rob Koss

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    In the deep south your probably not concerned as much with air flow, condensation, and a "dead air" space that beekeepers in the north use to help the hive through winter. I like them for the following reasons.

    1. In propping the lid, the bees really only have to defend the hole in the inner cover. This can also limit moths using the lid area for entry in the summer.

    2. I can lift the lid and see in the inner cover hole and get a reading on progress with the supers without opening the whole top.

    3. It creates an area for pollen substitute or dry sugar to sit in emergancy feeding situations.

    4. I can use gallon feeders sitting over the inner cover hole without exposing the hive to cold/wind in fall/winter.

    5. I sit the supers on the lid when inspecting, and having the inner cover means I can still have a top on them to keep them calm and less exposed. Less angry bees.

    6. I can work the inner cover alot easier when its propolized/burred to the hive or frames. I can't see how many frames are coming up when its just the top.

    Note. Whether you use them or not. Burr comb has to do with not having proper bee space.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Mobile, Alabama
    Posts
    536

    Post

    BjornBee said: 6. I can work the inner cover alot easier when its propolized/burred to the hive or frames. I can't see how many frames are coming up when its just the top.

    A good point. For this reason my tops are not like the typical outer cover. They are more a migratory style top that doesn't hang over the edges.

    ------------------
    Rob Koss

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Neodesha, Ks
    Posts
    623

    Post

    I use Inner Covers but I would think that if you didn't they would proplize the cover and make it harder to remove. Also it helps to contain the bees when you open the hive.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

    Post

    I agree that inner covers are very handy. One can cut the dimensions out of scrap ply board and cut a hole in the center as well.

    One of the very few things I can do with wood.


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,837

    Post

    Greetings chiefman,

    I use an inner-cover for the reasons BjornBee has stated. And I agree w/ him that Burr comb is caused by incorrect bee-space.

    A 'factory-made' inner-cover has a 'rim' around the edges. That rim creates the proper bee-space between your top-bars and the underneath side of inner-cover.

    A (telescoping) top-cover placed directly onto your super, does NOT provide the required bee-space.

    Try adding a screw that has a 'thick head' (like #12 sheet-metal), in each corner of your top-cover, so that when top-cover is in place and resting on the screw-heads, they create some extra space (and additional ventalation).

    And remember, most comb-building is usually done during nectar flows.

    Good Luck!
    Dave W

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,993

    Post

    I use inner covers with one flat side and the other with a rim spacing. I leave the rim side down through winter to provide proper winter cluster space. In the spring I turn the flat side down to prevent bur comb build up. Works well. It is used as a feeder board in the fall. Also provides a ventulated air space between the hive top and the rest of the hive bodies for those hot summer days. I swear by inner cover use...

    Ian

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