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Thread: Mad Bee

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Germantown, Ohio
    Posts
    43

    Post

    I was standing by my hives today (about 20 feet away) watching the activity, when all of the sudden a bee zoomed around my head a few times and then landed on my shoulder and stung me. What was that all about?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Mason, MI, USA
    Posts
    1,015

    Post

    Sounds like she didn't like something you did or some smell that was on you like coffee or a smell like an alarm pheramone.
    Clint

    ------------------
    Clinton Bemrose
    just South of Lansing Michigan

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Minnesota, USA
    Posts
    307

    Post

    PMS

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Leonardtown, Md, USA
    Posts
    235

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    All the bees must be talking. The same thing happened to me yesterday!!
    I was sitting by the hive minding my own business when all of a sudden one of those ungrateful @#@ flew over and nailed me on my forhead!! What gratitude....

  5. #5
    jfischer Guest

    Post


    We call these "Kamakaz-bees".

    They will "ping" right off your forehead,
    (or veil, if you are wearing one) and give you "fair warning" that you have violated
    their secure perimeter, and should retreat,
    or face the consequences.

    If you listen with care, these bees fly
    at a faster speed, and hence make a
    higher-pitched sound than all other bee
    flight around the hive. Their intent is
    to intimidate, NOT to sting, but they can,
    after bouncing off your forehead, fall onto
    you and may sting simply because they are stunned or confused by the impact.

    If you have a very good ear and decent
    reflexes, you can learn to cup your
    hands, and clap with the edges of your
    palms AROUND the bee as it approaches your
    forehead. The air pressure from your "clap"
    will stun the bee, and it will drop like a
    rock. The bee will recover, but not for a
    while. While some accuse me of performing a
    jedi mind trick, I have searched for and shown them the stunned, but still living bee
    in the grass.

    Now, here's the weird thing. A hive that
    lauches a Kamakaz-Bee sortie against you
    will launch ONE bee at a time. If you stun
    the bee as I described, the hive has no way
    to know if you have been scared off or not,
    but you will find that yet ANOTHER Kamakaz-Bee
    will make a similar, if not identical run
    at your forehead in roughly 3 mins from the
    first.

    All I can assume is that a hive assumes that
    one will not be enough, and lauches such
    sorties at regular intervals, with bees
    "patroling" the hive area on some sort of
    3 minute cycling schedule.

    Not all hives do this. Hives "in shade"
    tend to do it more often. Some hives
    never do it. Some hives will do it every
    time you approach that hive. My view is
    that this is a form of "defensive" behavior
    that I can tolerate, but one that I have
    found can be eliminated (or introduced!) by requeening.

    The "stun the bee" trick should be practiced
    with louder, larger, slower-flying drones
    before trying it with stinging worker bees,
    for obvious reasons. Musical training, and
    a "good ear" seems to be the critical factor,
    as I had my sister doing this with style and
    panache with a half hour of practice on
    drones, but have been unable to teach a few
    of the local teenagers I hire even after
    several seasons.

    ...and yeah, they fly straight into your
    forehead, just above the eyes. This target
    area is the key to stunning the bee. You
    know WHERE the bee will be in (x,y,z) space
    around you, so the only estimate you need
    to make is the position. There is a tiny
    bit of doppler here, but mostly it is
    nothing but "stereo perception" that lets
    you perform the trick.

    It is not hard. Any 5-year-old can catch
    a ball when you throw it to him. You simply
    need to learn to use your ears as you use
    your eyes.

    And when you learn to do it, you will be
    a "Jedi Master Beekeeper".

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Germantown, Ohio
    Posts
    43

    Post

    Aren't you afraid the neighbors will see you? They won't see the bee, but they will see you clapping now and then...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Williston, NC, USA
    Posts
    1,779

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    jfisher, how interesting! I've been stung on the forehead--only once unprovoked--in that fashion three times in the past year. Sounds like a real talent to me--you gotta be fast--but I do hear them coming, so I'll try to practice on drones so next time I'll be prepared! Thanks!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    Is it my imagination or do the Russian bees seem to do this more?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
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    5,159

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    >Is it my imagination or do the Russian bees seem to do this more?


    Mine did, but they also came in droves. Not anymore...

  10. #10
    jfischer Guest

    Post

    Hives that launch consistent Kamakaz-Bee
    sorties need to be requeened in my not-so
    humble view.

    I've never bothered with Russian bees,
    so I can't say why they might do this
    more often, or even if they do this more
    often.

    Neighbors? The mere fact that I open up
    beehives defines me as completely batty
    in the mind of anyone who might drive by,
    but most of my hives are out-of-sight of
    any road.


  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    I don't get stung a lot by the Russians, just head butted.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Fredericksburg, Va
    Posts
    798

    Cool

    One of my Russians head butted me just a few days ago - I thought it was a spring time kiss.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Anderson,IN,USA
    Posts
    130

    Wink

    >you can learn to cup your
    hands, and clap with the edges of your
    palms AROUND the bee as it approaches your
    forehead.

    I like to catch them in mid air with chopsticks and gently release them back at their hive entrance.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
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    5,159

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    >I like to catch them in mid air with chopsticks and gently release them back at their hive entrance.

    Out here we like to use tiny lasso's, the real trick is to get them leg tied in under three seconds.

  15. #15
    Jason G in Tennessee Guest

    Wink

    Musical training, and
    a "good ear" seems to be the critical factor,

    Where do I get a good music trainer for my bees??
    Jason

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,763

    Wink

    I think I'm going to start a new business. I understand they now have "pet psychics" and "pet psychologists". Maybe I should become a "bee psychic" or a "bee psychologist". I could advise you on why your bees don't appreciate you and talk to them about their emotional problems of having such a mixed up family. I'm sure the drones have some severe emotional trauma from never having a father and the rest all lost their father before they were even layed, let alone hatched. Think of all the emotional issues I could try to resolve. I'm betting they will be much better behaved if they aren't "acting out" from all these emotional scars. Maybe I could talk to the hive after they swarmed and tell people why the other bees ran away from home.

    I think there's a lot of potential for this field. What do you all think?

    Of course I could also hire out as a bee trainer.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,763

    Post

    Maybe Jim Fischer will let me advertise on his web site.
    http://www.bee-quick.com/bee-quick/rpt2/

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Cardington, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    65

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    I can never quite decide if you guys are totally crazy or if you're yanking my chain. If nothing else you're terribly amusing!

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,763

    Wink

    >I can never quite decide if you guys are totally crazy or if you're yanking my chain. If nothing else you're terribly amusing!

    If you look at the top of the "bee psychic" post you'll see a winking face. That should be the give away.

    Jim, on the other hand, is entirely serious.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    19

    Post

    Love the web site above...

    perhaps the link should have been posted today.....Hmmm

    April 1

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