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  1. #1
    kookaburra Guest

    Post

    Hi
    Here's the situation...
    The bees over-wintered in a honey super on top of the hive. This spring the queen started her brood-raising there. Since the super is borrowed, and the gentleman will need it back, I have to get her out. So first chance I got (about 3 wks ago?) I switched it to the bottom. Last week Friday (April 2) I checked it, and there were no eggs, just brood, and there were lots of eggs in the brood boxes, so I switched the super to the top with the excluder under it.

    I checked it Saturday, and the last of the brood is hatching out, and the super is pretty empty, but I noticed on the top of one of the frames a thin strip where there are larvae, and I just noticed a few cells with eggs!!

    I hadn't seen those before but there are only a few eggs, a couple small larvae and a bunch of bigger larvae.

    Could those be old eggs (week +) that may have gotten chilled? I would think that if that was the case they would look less healthy
    Did the queen lay a few before moving up before I switched the super?

    The larvae look healthy (from the smallest to the largest ones). They all look like drones (I am not the best at discerning that yet). Is this an issue? Could a worker gotten freaked out from being somewhat divided and started laying?

    There were only a handful of bees up top, and I am certain the queen wasn't up there. She has been showing a good pattern in the regular brood boxes.

    Thanks
    -rick

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,384

    Post

    >I have to get her out. So first chance I got (about 3 wks ago?) I switched it to the bottom. Last week Friday (April 2) I checked it, and there were no eggs, just brood, and there were lots of eggs in the brood boxes, so I switched the super to the top with the excluder under it.
    I checked it Saturday, and the last of the brood is hatching out, and the super is pretty empty, but I noticed on the top of one of the frames a thin strip where there are larvae, and I just noticed a few cells with eggs!!

    >I hadn't seen those before but there are only a few eggs, a couple small larvae and a bunch of bigger larvae.

    How much area is a "bunch"? Did you find the queen? Is she below the excluder?

    >Could those be old eggs (week +) that may have gotten chilled?

    Not impossible, but doubtful. Since there is brood around there would be nurse bees around and they tend to be good housekeepers and probably wouldn't leave them laying around that long.

    >Did the queen lay a few before moving up before I switched the super?

    Maybe or maybe she even moved back down since some of it opened up when they emerged. She likes to lay in places that have had brood in them before.

    >The larvae look healthy (from the smallest to the largest ones). They all look like drones (I am not the best at discerning that yet). Is this an issue?

    Why do you think they are drones? The size of the cell? The dome on the cappings?

    >Could a worker gotten freaked out from being somewhat divided and started laying?

    Not impossible, but if it's a worker you will almost always see two and three eggs to a cell, not just one egg.

    There were only a handful of bees up top, and I am certain the queen wasn't up there. She has been showing a good pattern in the regular brood boxes.

    If it's only a little brood and a few eggs I wouldn't sweat it. Just pull the super off and shake out the bees. If it's a lot, then decide if you want to buy him another super or what other alternatives you want to find.

    Eggs are a small investment for the bees. Proportionaly, almost grown larvae are a big investment for the bees. I wouldn't sweat the eggs at all.

  3. #3
    kookaburra Guest

    Post

    Thanks Michael

    I won't worry too much then. I am planning on pulling it this week sometime.

    Most of the capped brood has hatched by now ( 3 or 4 hand/palm size sections).

    It really threw me because it looks like it is only maybe an inch across the top of one of the frames where this is, anywhere from large uncapped larva to teensy larve and eggs, just a few.

    There didn't appear to be many bees attending them either, although all of the larva look healthy (to my untrained eye!).

    And yes, some of the comb with the larvae did look like drone comb, I don't remember if all was.

    Thanks for the help

    -Rick

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