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  1. #1
    BeeScared Guest

    Big Grin


    Hi i’m new to this site and this is the story of how I overcame my fear of bees.
    I used to be terrified of bees because back when I was 5 (now i’m thirteen) I ran into a ground nest of bees when I was riding my tricycle and I guess they got angry but anyway, they all came out and stung me all over and since then i have been downright terrified of bees.
    My uncle has been keeping some bee hives at my grandmas and he was (and still is) a bee keeper, and for the fourth of july my family went over to my grandmas to celebrate. I was pretty freaked to go outside some of the time. But later my uncle picked up a bee from the ground and he just let it crawl over his arm. Then he put it halfway into his mouth. He said it was a drone and was perfectly harmless. So I tried to hold it and i felt pretty good about holding a bee ( I named my drone Freddy ).Now I know how to distinguish a drone from a worker or any other bee. So since I was so intrested in it, my uncle put on a long sleeve shirt and a veil then he let me put on another veil and the gloves and the whole works and then we went over to the hives. I was pretty scared at first but then I seemed to like it.
    He pulled out one of the combs and let me hold it and I also stuck my hand (gloved) into the hive. He stuck his normal hand in the hive without getting stung. He said the bees weren’t intrested in him but in getting their work done. (I also got to smoke the bees, that was fun) After that my uncle took a worker bee and stung himself. I saw the venom sack wiggle and move. (it was injecting the venom) About two days later my mom showed me a website called beescource.com and thought I might be intrested. so I took a look around on the site and I did like it. So then my mom told me that my uncle Barry owned the sight. I was a little surprised. So now I want to be a bee keeper (along with some other jobs) when I grow up.
    I still have a fear of bees though, but not as big.This experience helped quite a bit because at first I would have nothing to do with bees until my uncle explained everything to me. I guess it helps to know what you are dealing with.

    I liked the thread ¬ďsomething strange¬Ē about the 800 pound rock in a tree started by hoosierhiver. I should try and expirement by trying to grow a rock in my tree!

    See some of the pictures my mom took of me in the beekeeping outfit and don’t laugh. http://www.dolliesdressmaker.com/users/bee/bee1.jpg http://www.dolliesdressmaker.com/users/bee/bee2.jpg

    Any comments or advice for future refrences?

    BeeScared




  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    hartley,texas,USA
    Posts
    65

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    welcome ,glad to have you around .
    Chris Joens

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,212

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    Its a frame from a top bar hive with an arched support on it. Very cool.

    Welcome

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Elizabethtown,KY
    Posts
    260

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    beescared,
    You should change your name to beebrave.You are to be commended as you did a very courageous thing and that is to face your fear. Many adults never learn to do this. It is something I was discussing with my daughters just yesterday.
    We need more young beekeepers. Tell your friends at school about your experience and maybe they will get interested too! Good luck!
    Denise
    Luna Apiaries

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Grifton, NC
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    1,302

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    Coyote,
    also notice that he didn't say "I was like, you know, freaked out by all the bees." And "my uncle was like, you know, what's up with all that, you know?" "So, I was like up to my elbows in bees, you know, and he was like, they won't sting you, and I was like, cool with that, you know and he was like, duh!"

  6. #6
    BeeScared Guest

    Post

    Hey, duuuuuude! Wuz Up???!! like those bees,..you know? Those bees were like up to my elbows and i was almost like ,soooo out of there!!!Ya now?.......By the way my uncle wuz like...wuz up with all of that.....ya know?

    I’m a little diffrent from the other kids in school. I prefer proper grammer...I’m unique! hehe

    Sorry, but i’m no boy scout. But I have a friend that is in boy scouts if that helps any.

    Fashion statements--Have any of you ,looked at the pictures yet? Do you think the suite is a little baggy? Obviously made for a bigger person...

    As for sharing this with my friends at school...well schools out. But I will when school starts again.Thank you denise_ky

    Thank you for the welcome every one. I appreciate it.

    BeeScared AKA BeeBrave

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,462

    Wink

    Hello brave guy -

    Nice pictures! Who's that handsome young man next to you?

    So often our fears are based on wild assumptions that have little to do with fact, mostly emotions. I can understand what a terrible experience it was for you to have been stung many times by yellow jackets. You've spent 8 years being afraid of all "bees" because of one experience you had with hornets, not bees.

    > I guess it helps to know what you are dealing with.

    Yes it does. If we learn to understand the characteristics and behavior of the insect (in your case, "bees") that scares us, we will better be able to co-exist with it and avoid future experiences that are painful. Honeybees have a very different behavior than hornets. For the most part, bees are nectar/pollen gatherers from plants, and hornets are carnivores, flesh-eating insects. Unless you produce pollen or nectar, you will probably never have a honeybee pay you a visit.

    I suggest you keep learning more about stinging insects like bees and hornets and I think you will actually come to like and appreciate the honeybee. It won't bother me if you dislike hornets :> ) Perhaps you will even let a honeybee sting you so this won't be a fearful unknown. Yes it is smarts when you get stung, but it is manageable.

    Stick with your uncle, it sounds like he will help you become a beekeeper.

    Regards,
    Barry .... a handsome young man

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,212

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    I always buy my bee suits big. It makes some ventilation when you move around and it's easier to get on and off. It looks just right to me.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    worthington pa usa
    Posts
    76

    Post

    WAY TO GO BEESCARD!
    I too was stung when I was a kid ,put me in the hospital. I know what it takes to walk up to a bee hive after that.My hats' off to you!
    scott

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Wyoming MN
    Posts
    406

    Post

    BRAVO -BeeScared/BeeBrave
    Any time you learn to face the things that you fear, you begin to take control of them and diminish them. As you have already learned, life is a scary thing. I have worked with adults that don't have that skill yet. Your family must be proud of you. You are a fortunate young man, and have a fortunate family. Continue your adventures!

  11. #11
    BeeScared Guest

    Cool

    >Stick with your uncle, it sounds like he will help you become a beekeeper
    I will stick with my uncle! Thank you Uncle Barry


    I don’t really own any hives...but i’m trying to learn some more about bees (by checking out books at the library and looking at all the posts on beesource.com)so I don’t have to still jump and run when I see one.... and for when I do own some hives.
    Any words of wisdom anybody?

    Thank you scottybee...What kind of bee did you get stung by?

    Thank you again every one
    (I like this site)

    by the way coyote how come you were hoping I was a boy scout?
    I can become one!

    BeeScared

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,212

    Post

    I wish you had been MY Boy Scout leader.

  13. #13
    BeeScared Guest

    >From snow camping in January in the Rockies to rafting the Colorado River in the summer, we're always out doing something. We ski, snowboard, rock climb and rappel, hike, camp, fish, backpack, canoe, etc.

    I have also noticed that you din’t list (for what boyscouts teaches) that boyscouts doesn’t teach beekeeping.Any particular reason? If they did, I would really want to join!

    >About half of my troop are in Canada right now on a 10-day canoe trip on the Boundary Waters.

    My friend who is a boy scout is on some 10 day trip to somwhere with his troop also right now.


    >I wish you had been MY Boy Scout leader.
    Actually, if I was in boyscouts I would too!

    How do you put the little smilie faces in your posts?

    Can anybody recomend a begginers bee book?

    Also, how do colinies determine who there queen bee is?don’t more than one larvae hatch into queen bees?I was looking through Beesource and saw something to do with royal jelly, does this have anything to do with it?


    BeeScared

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    >I have also noticed that you din’t list (for what boyscouts teaches) that boyscouts doesn’t teach beekeeping.Any particular reason? If they did, I would really want to join!

    When I was in Boy Scouts there was a beekeeping merit badge. I don't know if there still is or not.

    >How do you put the little smilie faces in your posts?

    Personally I just type a colon ":" followed by a closed parenthese ")" : ) and it gets converted, but I think you can choose "smilies legend" from the left hand margin it tells you how to do other smilies like this one (which is a colon and a capitol D)

    >Can anybody recomend a begginers bee book?

    People seem fond of "Beekeeping for Dummies" but I find myself offended by books that insult my inteligence. Why not "Beekeeping for the ignorant". That I would buy. Actualy it always seemed to me that any subject is so complicated that you just have to dive in and learn what you can. The hive and the honey bee is a thick book, but by the time you get to the end you have a notion of how things work. The next time through it makes a lot more sense than the first time and the next time makes even more sense. It always seems like a "beginners" book in anything oversimplifies things and in the process of simplifying does not really convey the truth of things.

    >Also, how do colinies determine who there queen bee is?don’t more than one larvae hatch into queen bees?

    I'm not sure it's cut and dried. There are many situations where a queen is raised. An emergency queen, a swarm queen, a supercedure queen. In the case of an emergency, I think it's usually the first one to emerge that kills the rest, if the workers don't do it for her. In the case of a swarm, they may hatch all of them and all of them may leave with more bees except (hopefully) the last one. The workers sometimes protect one queen from the first to emerge in cases like this. Sometimes they don't and the first queen kills the rest of the swarm cells. In a supercedure I think the workers sometimes make their own choice by destroying remaing cells or not and letting them fight it out.

    >I was looking through Beesource and saw something to do with royal jelly, does this have anything to do with it?

    That is what causes a worker larvae to develop into a queen. The workers have a sense for how old the larvae is and will only try to develop one that is under a certain age. All workers get SOME royal jelly, but queen larvae are swimming in it. They also build on to the cell so that it is very large and hanging down to hold all of the royal jelly and to hold the much larger queen.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
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    Neodesha, Ks
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    623

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    I bet Uncle Barry could arrange to get you set up with a Hive of Bees. Read all you can, learn all you can, and get as much experience as you can. It will all come in handy sometime later in life. Have fun with the bees. [Sorry about your bad experience with the bees].

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,462

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    > [Sorry about your bad experience with the bees].

    Hornets!

    Zach, when you want to start reading books about honeybees, you come see me and I'll let you read all the books you want! I've even got that one for dummies. Don't tell Michael though.

    -Barry

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Elizabethtown,KY
    Posts
    260

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    BeeBrave,
    I always recommend The Beekeepers Handbook by Diana Sammataro and Alphonse Avitabile.
    It's an easy read, great for beginners and advanced bee keepers.
    Denise

  18. #18
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
    Posts
    1,966

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    Dear Beebrave,
    I'm at the other end of this age tunnel.I'm 70. Since I haven't been keeping bees that long, I still have my fears and they make a nice challange in life. What fun would things be if there were no challanges?
    At a workshop the other week I saw a beekeeper examine 20 frames in a colony in a T-shirt, without veil or gloves. When a bee got in his hair he gently combed it out with his fingers. His secret seemed to be slow, slow movements.
    Seeing that there was nothing between me and this ability but my fear, I was motivated to take more chances.
    A few days later I had to add a super and didn't dress up. As bees will, these surprised me a little and all at once I had too many in the air. (I guess I bumped them!)Anyway, 2 or 3 landed on my face. "Don't slap, don't slap", I told myself. I took a deep breath and calmed down. I actually saw one of them taste my sweat for a second. They checked me out and went on their way. It was hard not to move fast and get clumsy as I put the super on and closed up. Because of my clumsiness I did get one sting on the hand.
    This was a small step but I felt exhilerated. I suit up most times but will work on this challange some more.
    Thanks for sharing your story.

    Dick Marron

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    Then again, I decided a couple of days ago, to pick up a queen cage to release her, without any gloves on and as soon as I picked up the cage a bee came off the frame below and stung my finger. No warning and no provocation that I could see. Bees are unpredictable, but certainly slow and calm is the way to not get them wound up.

  20. #20
    BeeBrave- Welcome to the forum! I am also a new beekeeper this year, with just two hives started this past April. I have learned so much about the bees from this forum as well as from my local beekeeping club. I have made tons of mistakes,including squishing the queen between hive bodies, and reversing the deeps at the wrong time, I had two swarms but only captured one. I have learned that reading about beekeeping is fantastic, but getting out there and doing it is better than anything else. They are fussy little bugs, but they bring me much joy so I keep trying. Good job overcoming your fears. I have a 40 year old friend who won't even come to my house anymore since I got the bees! She's terrified! BTW, you look great in your beesuit - like a real pro!

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