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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Kansas City, MO
    Posts
    169

    Cool

    Today was my bee group's all day bee workshop day. Lots of sitting in hard chairs!
    I did see lots of great slides.

    Small hive beetle is in southern and eastern Missouri, but not seen in KC metro - yet.

    I learned that in order for apple trees to pollinate correctly you have to have more than one kind of apple tree around.

    That if you ask the guys and Jolie about using Essent oils, vit c, liquid leth, fgmo fogging, small cell etc you are nuts and listening to people who just say it is great. They said that if I want to learn about NPM techs, I should only look at sites by universities and bee labs.

    Basically you guys are kooks for considering anything BUT chemicals all the time for everything.

    They talked about grease patties a little - not saying what they do. Really discounted bee escapes - pushed the fume board/beego/beequik. I guess if I had hundreds of hives I'd take the fastest way.

    One other man and I were asking about the FGMo fogging. He bought a fogger off ebay. Some one told him it was petrol product and he'd be wasting his time. I told this guy to check out this site and that there is a organic email loop (which I am currently lurking - lurk lurk). He doesn't want chems in his hive. He feels that even if you do the chems before the honey supers go on, it is still in the brood boxes/frames/wax. Then the bees will track it up into the supers. Plus the babies will be born in it. Perhaps the resistance to the chems begins with the residue in the brood frames.

    I found out mid-con is getting all their bees from CA. None from the south.

    I've decided to strike up a deal with the 20 yr old farm girl, who pollinates her neighbor's fruit orchard. She's going to sell me - 3 frames of brood, queen and some bees for $60. I will take my 2 bottoms,2 deeps and lids to church in April. She'd take them home to the farm and set it up in my deeps. Then I'll drive out and pick them up in the evening - that day or the next. So, I'll be about a month ahead than those getting a package.

    One nice old guy, I was bugging about breeds. Told me he had mutts. He's not sure what breed they are now. He hasn't bought a queen or bees in years. His bees take care of business just fine.

    One presenter, I asked about the escent oils etc goes " Well I only use them in my soaps!". He must have thought I was from the moon from the look I got! And he was a young guy - ok younger than me...coulda been my kid.

    I'd sure hate to get into a talk with these guys about organic foods! Or alternative med. Or Pres Bush. or tofu....yoga....

    They are fasinated that I bring my knitting with me to meetings. Kinda funny.

    I won a bee brush. I needed one.

    So - your thoughts?

    Martha

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,108

    Post

    Sounds normal to me.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Kansas City, MO
    Posts
    169

    Cool

    So, at these meetings they will corner me and let me know I'm nutty and try to steer me from the "ways of evil"?

    Poo. Maybe me the the fogger guy can just hang in the corner with our coffee and my knitting.

    I organic garden. From the talk the orchard guy gave yesterday - I'd NEVER want to eat his fruit! But, maybe I'd be so full of pesticdes I'd never get chigger or 'skitter bit?

    Thanks Michael,
    Martha

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,108

    Post

    Naw. They will get used to you. As long as you don't try to convert them, they will probably leave you alone.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    So what's the point of "being part of a group" if the best you can get from them is "being left alone"?

    Just do the best you can while being part of your group, when you methods succeed perhaps in a few years they will come to you for advice. Who knows.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,108

    Post

    There are always a lot of things to learn from a group like this. Like when the nectar flows are, methods of feeding that work well in your area, arrangments for overwintering that work well in your area. Just because they don't treat for mites and disease like you do doesn't mean they don't have a lot of useful information.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Neodesha, Ks
    Posts
    623

    Post

    Martha, If yoiu were making your living selling CHEMS you would be pushing them to. Think about it, it just makes sence for them to push chems. Hard to change old habits. Dale

  8. #8
    jfischer Guest

    Post


    It is not that beekeeping associations tend to be full of people
    who want to "push chemicals", it is just that most beekeepers
    tend to listen to their inspectors and state apiarists, buy from
    the beekeeping catalogs, and read the magazines, read the research
    papers, listen to presentations by recognized experts, and otherwise
    educate themselves.

    In short, its called "The Conventional Wisdom" for a reason.
    Nothing would have become either "conventional" or "wise"
    unless it produced results.

    That said, "traditions" are nothing but untested and unproven
    new ideas that happened to work.

    I gave a presentation on "sugar dusting" several years ago
    to a beekeeping association who will remain nameless to
    protect the guilty, and when introducing me, the meeting
    facilitator said "Please remember that the use of powdered
    sugar as a miticide is not endorsed by any state yet, and
    that there have been very few controlled studies concluding
    that it is an adequate mite control."

    Expect skeptics. Expect anyone who keeps bees to care enough
    about bees to understand that the survival of YOUR bees is
    "important" to him/her. They really want to help, just like
    you do.

    Beekeepers, regardless of their preferences in beekeeping
    methods and techniques, tend to be driven by a very simple
    "program", one that loops constantly in their minds:

    a) I want my bees to survive and thrive.

    b) Your bees may be close enough to my bees
    to be a source of diseases and/or pests
    that could spread to my hives.

    c) Therefore, I want YOUR bees to survive and
    thrive just as much as I want MY bees to
    survive and thrive.

    And some people even add an extra step or two:

    d) Against your will, if necessary.

    e) Because I ( am smarter / am more experienced /
    have more hives / am better educated) than you,
    you should listen to me.

    A serious problem crops up when two or more beekeepers,
    all executing this same (faulty) program code encounter
    each other after picking a specific method that worked
    for them once or twice. - They argue.

    The more each argues his/her case, the more the other
    is motivated to "save" their fellow beekeeper from the
    error of their ways. (Yes, "evangelical beekeeping".
    You can find quite a bit of it on the internet.)

    It is a comedy laugh riot.
    No one ever has anything that might remotely be described
    as "data" to back up their anecdotal and apocryphal claims,
    but they BELIEVE in things.

    Everyone wants to "believe" - its much
    easier than thinking.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Kansas City, MO
    Posts
    169

    Cool

    Oh, I'll stay with the group. I have learned a bunch from them.

    Yeah and won door prizes.

    I know about being roped in to do club jobs - I've been a cub scout den leader, cub master, committee person for the troop, treasurer for the Region 3 homeschoolers in Missouri, Religious Ed teacher at my parish, the ONLY cantor at my parish (for a while).

    Now I'm treasurer for my neighborhood assn, part of a group that cares for a guy with AIDS, committee member of my son's scout troop (I have one Eagle-the other is VERY close), still a cantor - but 1 of 3 and help out at other Masses with choirs, still homeschooling one kid, diocese contact for religious ed/confirmation program, and help my mom and my mom in law - oh and I get to be grandma sometimes!

    There is NO WAY I will join in the administration of this bee group. The people who keep getting re-elected do just fine!lol.

    I understand these people don't want me to have sick bees or kill my bees when I could have saved them. I also don't truck mine to CA for almond pollination or anything.

    I do like the one to one contact with them. I was just so surprised at the reactions I received at the bee day. They talk alot about the bees becoming resistant to the chemicals/drugs. I just thought they were also looking for another way - rather than when is the next formula coming out.

    I have learned a ton on this site too. Since you can't see me, I don't feel like such an idiot when asking questions. And I can't see you all rolling your eyes!LOL.

    Thanks,
    Martha

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