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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    46

    Post

    I've been reading more of John Vivian's book keeping bees. On the collecting wild bees section he tell how to move them from the trap box to the hive, which starts the question.

    He puts some drawn comb in a frame between two strings. I don't know what drawn comb is and haven't found an answer to that question either. It appears from the pictures that it is comb cells that are empty? He said that the bees will finish fastening the comb to the frame and haul the string out side and dispose of it.
    There is still comb in the short block (about 15" long and standing vertial) of wood I cut off that apperes to be empty as yesterday the 2nd. The bees seem to be robbing the honey from that chunk of wood and takeing it back to the horzontal log.
    Might this help me capture the bees from the big chunk of log?
    Al

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Post

    > He puts some drawn comb in a frame between two strings. I don't know what drawn comb is and haven't found an answer to that question either.

    Comb that is not just foundation but has cells with depth to them is "drawn comb". Sounds like he's writing about moving bees from a bait hive. In which case you're just taking what the bees have built and putting it in frames so you can put it in a hive.

    Tying the combs into a frame is the standard method of moving a hive to a Lanstroth box. When doing a tree or whatever I try to just do the brood and scrap the honey comb for honey.

    >It appears from the pictures that it is comb cells that are empty? He said that the bees will finish fastening the comb to the frame and haul the string out side and dispose of it.

    Basically, yes that's what the bees will do. I wouldn't bother with comb that doesn't have anything in it though. I'm thinking he's just talking about the little bit of comb that is in a bait hive so they will have comb to hang on and it will smell like their hive (the bait hive).

    >There is still comb in the short block (about 15" long and standing vertial) of wood I cut off that apperes to be empty as yesterday the 2nd. The bees seem to be robbing the honey from that chunk of wood and takeing it back to the horzontal log.

    That's because the brood nest is back at the other log so they are moving it back there.

    >Might this help me capture the bees from the big chunk of log?

    Empty comb is useful to put in a bait hive to make it smell right. It won't make them want to move out of the tree, but if they swarm it may make them think your box looks like a nice place to live. Then again it may not.

    I like the idea of cutting ALL of the comb out of the horizontal log and tying it into frames. Or setting it back right side up and super it with a box.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Parkersburg WV. USA
    Posts
    19

    Post

    http://movba.org.seanic15.net/crosscomb.html
    A site I thought might be helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Post

    A lot of good pictures. I do it a bit different. I make sure the comb fills the frame to the top. If it doesn't I cut a piece to fill in. If you don't how will the bees connect it all together?

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