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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Snohomish, WA, USA
    Posts
    33

    Post

    Okay all you smart people, I need some ideas. I want to re-start my OB hive and don't know the best way. I am planning on putting a frame of eggs, brood, bees from a strong outside hive in the OB but did not have any luck with letting them requeen last year (I got several queens but the survivor never went on a mating flight and then got "taken out" herself) My hive is vertical, 2 deeps and 1 super. I'm not sure how to introduce a queen (a cage won't work cause I'd have to go back and remove it and can't do that without opening the whole thing). Same with push-in cages. Should I introduce her through the food chamber or use Glade or Pledge (I've seen that tip but it seems scary to put chemicals in there). Any better ideas?
    MGidewall<BR>Snohomish, WA

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    hermiston, oregon
    Posts
    458

    Post

    I requeened my OB hive last year. I have a 5 frame(all deeps) standing vertical. I had enough room under the bottom frame to put the little box the queen came in but it does mean opening the hive a little. I just slid up my plexiglass enough to slide/remove the queen box.

    I also thought about tapeing the queen box to a vent hole in such a way that they could get to the candy plug(after I remove the screen in the OB hive of course).
    ------------------------------------------<br />Colton<br />------------------------------------------

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,361

    Post

    What about taking the queen from the outside hive with the bees, then introducing a new queen outside?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Bridgewater VT. USA
    Posts
    238

    Post

    I agree with Ross place a frame of brood with Queen on it in the OH and requeen outside hive.
    Stuart

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Langley, B.C. Canada
    Posts
    413

    Post

    I introduced a frame of eggs in May of last year into OB hive and the girls did the rest.I shure learned alot. Terry

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,797

    Post

    I've had fairly good success with direct introduction of a queen. Make sure they've been queenless overnight and just smoke them good and run her in.

    I've also had success with them raising and mating a queen in my observation hive. I'm not sure why yours failed before. But Give them a frame of brood and lots of bees and they should handle it.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Langley, B.C. Canada
    Posts
    413

    Post

    Michael is there any drones out at this time of the year to be raising queens, my girls are in there hives .Temperture 8 celsius here.We start raising queens on April 15 when the nectar flow is on. Terry

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    tulsa, ok usa
    Posts
    2,264

    Post

    Ross is right about taking a queen and bees from an outside hive.

    I like to have the observation hive raise their queen; however, because you learn a lot. To do this with an observation hive that is not started do the following:

    1.Take a super frame and put it in a hive so some eggs can get some larva started.

    2.Take two brood frames with capped brood and a lot of bees and put it in the observation hive with the super frame with larva.

    3.Keep the hive sealed for at least five days.

    This does work because I have done it. What makes this really interesting is that you can hear the queens chirping. RossÂ’s way is 100% sure fire but this way is more interesting.

    You will have to wait until there are drones about.
    Home of the ventilated and sting resistant Ultra Breeze bee suits and jackets
    http://www.honeymoonapiaries.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Medina, OH USA
    Posts
    69

    Post

    I usually tie a very thin wire on the queen box. Slightly crack the door and put it in with a length of wire still out the top. I adjust the depth after the door is 99% closed. After she is out and undisturbed for a week I crack the door again and pull the box out.Takes 1/100 of a second. I have a 16 frame OH in our sun room and no one has ever escaped and there is A LOT of bees in there.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,797

    Post

    &gt;Michael is there any drones out at this time of the year to be raising queens

    Not here and I doubt there are most places. YOu have to have drones flying, not just have them in the hive, before you try to get them to raise a queen.

    &gt; my girls are in there hives .Temperture 8 celsius here.We start raising queens on April 15 when the nectar flow is on.

    It's different for every climate, but I go by drones flying. If they aren't flying then it's not time to start raising queens yet.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Langley, B.C. Canada
    Posts
    413

    Post

    Michael- last year I tried raising queens in late August,10 nice queens all drone layers,never mated,it was so hard to kill them . Live and learn - Terry -

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hamilton, Alabama
    Posts
    1,209

    Post

    One of the surprising things re drones is that different races treat them so differently in the fall.

    The Italians kick the drones out but usually over a period of a week or more.

    The Carniolans kick the drones out over 2 or 3 days.

    The old black bees that were so common here (A.M.Mellifera) kicked the drones out post haste, usually they were there one day and gone the next.

    The strangest of all though is a pure strain of Buckfast. For some reason, they will occasionally tolerate a few drones right through the winter. They do this even though they have a very healthy young queen in the hive. I've used this trait to advantage if I needed a queen or two in an emergency and a few days of 65 degree weather come along in late winter.

    Fusion

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,797

    Post

    &gt;Michael- last year I tried raising queens in late August,10 nice queens all drone layers,never mated,it was so hard to kill them . Live and learn - Terry -

    Last year I did a batch in September and they are laying fine. And I think I'm in the North.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Mobile, Alabama
    Posts
    536

    Post

    Fusion,

    Down here on the Gulf Coast, most of my colonies will carry a few drones through the Winter. Since most of my bees are mutts, I have always attributed this to the mild Winters we have here. Now you have me wondering.

    I looked at a few hives on Sunday (1/30), and I saw a little bit of sealed drone brood on the edges of a couple of brood nests, and one particularly strong colony had a large patch of drone comb laid up with eggs.
    Rob Koss

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hamilton, Alabama
    Posts
    1,209

    Post

    You know, we ship package bees to other states, I wonder if anyone has tried shipping a drone package? It would be possible to introduce mature drones to just about any colony that has drone brood or that is queenless. With an adequate drone source, much earlier queen rearing could be done. Of course, you would still need appropriate mating weather. Queens are reluctant to fly at temps below 60F and usually best results are at 70 to 90.

    Fusion

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,797

    Post

    Yes, but would the drones be acclimatized to your climate? The ones flying in your area are more likely to be able to live well in your climate.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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