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  1. #1
    Scott L Guest

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    Hello, I am a student from East Tennessee. I would like to get started in beekeeping as a hobby. I have much of the equipment that is needed and one colony of bees. I have no idea how they are doing or how to check on them. My father used to work with bees some but he doesn't have time anymore. It would be greatly appreciated if someone could let me know what I need to do to get started. The bees are in a hive that has two boxes (sorry about the terminology??) and a lid. I know the boxes* are not supers they don't have any trays in them. This colony has always seemed pretty strong but I'm just uncertain about the whole aspect. If I could split it that would be wonderful and have two. If someone could tell me where some literature is or a book or something that would help me to get started that would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks for any help. Sorry about the terminology I'm just not that familiar with it yet.
    Thanks again...
    Scott L TN USA

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,647

    Post

    Hi Scott -

    Some good "getting started" info on the web is at: http://maarec.cas.psu.edu/Beeinfoindex.html

    A good starter book is Beekeeping for Dummies.

    Regards,
    Barry

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Bluff City, TN USA
    Posts
    80

    Post

    Hi Scott, There are many good beekeepers in E. Tennessee as well as several clubs. What ia Talbot close to?

    ------------------
    Jim

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,742

    Post

    I'm not sure what "no trays" means. If there are no frames in the boxes then you just have a box hive with comb running anywhere. Probably, though,since there are two there probably are frames in the boxes. The easiest is to get involved in a club or find a friendly, helpful beekeeper who would go through the hive with you and show you the difference between honey comb, sealed worker brood, sealed drone comb, and open brood. But lacking that, there are lots of books with good pictures and advice. If you try to be in tune with the bees and pay attention to them they will teach you a lot. Make small changes and watch what they do. Just don't do anything too drastic until you're sure that's what you want to do. It's like driving a car. Small corrections work best most of the time.

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