Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 27

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    anaheim california USA
    Posts
    23

    Post

    I was wondering if using rosemary grown in my garden for verroa control would work. By placing pieces in the hive, the bee's would spread the oil troughout the hive by removing it. Thanks for any feed back.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,217

    Post

    Mites are very tough and very prolific. I have my doubts. If you want to try it, make sure you keep monitoring the mite level.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,217

    Post

    There are quite a few natural methods or soft methods that are being used sucessfully against varroa by those on this board. Look under Cell Calls, FGMO, and Diseases to find recent discussions. The alternative controls being used most, that I'm aware of are, in no particular order:

    Food Grade Mineral Oil (FGMO)
    Small cell
    Thymol
    Oxalic Acid
    Screened Bottom Boards
    Powdered sugar
    generic Vicks vapo rub (Daisy's solution to the world's problems )

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    You forgot one "natural" item from the list. How about spending a few extra bucks and getting a queen from a reputable queen breeder, who is working with resistant bees. Either you will be very happy or you can say you proved them wrong. (Assuming it was a genetics flaw and not poor beekeeping.) Funny how everyone buys foggers, oil, new foundation,etc, etc, etc, but then they buy the cheapest bees and packages on the market. Some do not even know what kind of bees they ordered.

  5. #5

    Wink

    carnica bee, you're not related to Daisy by any chance, are you??? ...if not, you guys should talk - sounds like one of her schemes!
    --
    Touche, BjornBee!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    anaheim california USA
    Posts
    23

    Post

    No, I'm not related to Daisy, just someone new to this post asking for imformation. Thanks to everyone .......

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

    Cool

    He Haw, Tex.....

    Schemes maybe but all my bees are still alive and buzzin....

    "Knock on wood" (hive). He he...

    Hey, Wonder where that expression (superstition) hails from?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    anaheim california USA
    Posts
    23

    Big Grin

    Daisy, what is your secret?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Drums, PA, USA
    Posts
    331

    Post

    You forgot one "natural" item from the list. How about spending a few extra bucks and getting a queen from a reputable queen breeder, who is working with resistant bees. Either you will be very happy or you can say you proved them wrong. (Assuming it was a genetics flaw and not poor beekeeping.) Funny how everyone buys foggers, oil, new foundation,etc, etc, etc, but then they buy the cheapest bees and packages on the market. Some do not even know what kind of bees they ordered.

    >>>> I agree totally. I think the varroa problem will be solved eventually with resistant bees. If the bees have it in their blood, they will know how to deal with mites, and also know how to survive them. All other natural things are good, but the bees are the most important. Finding a good supplier is key, unless you are essentially doing the same thing with your own stock. I do recommend some treatment in the meantime though.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,837

    Question

    How about a list of recommended sources . . for varroa resistant queens?

    thanx

    ------------------
    Dave W . . .

    A NewBEE with 1 hive.
    First package installed
    April, 2003.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    Dave W.
    I don't have a "list" as I have not ordered from more than one or two.

    B. Weaver advertises "no chems" for several years.
    Strachans - Selective hygenic and resistant selection
    Olympic wilderness - "mite resistant"

    Pick up any Bee Culture, ABJ, etc, and there are more to choose from. Many will advertise "hygenic selection or mite survivors" and some will advertise "no chems", etc. I also realize some may have less than advertised. Some also hate to claim 100% resistance, when these are under ideal, controlled, professionally run operations, and then they sell to hobbiest or others who loose bees to whatever reason, then claim how crappy the bees were and the breeder was at fault.

    I personally have spoken to Wootens in Ca. and they claim a strain or line of 95% resistant. I liked that honesty, as not every bee raised will be resistant, and in any breeding, some off-spring will be better and some will be less. I have also spoken and recieved info from Champlian Valley bees in Vt(No chems), and ordered "Russian" survivors from Arnold Apiaries in Tennessee.

    Special features on the Webb's in Georgia, who have russian survivors stock and no chemicals, show that others are selecting and being successful with resistant bees, without all "band-aid treatments", that help bees along, but do little in the long run.

    I wish there was a forum to discuss and talk about survivor/resistant/no chem approach on this site, without having to mix it up with those wishing to do the other things.

    [This message has been edited by BjornBee (edited January 18, 2004).]

  12. #12

    Arrow

    My basic feelings about the availability of resistant stock at the present time, is: "buyer beware". While some queen breeders (like Glenn Apiaries of California) have direct access to programs like the Russian bees from the USDA, not all queen breeders advertising supposedly "resistant stock" have such direct lines of offspring. And by the time you order fourth and fifth generation removed queens, I think their mite resistance is pretty "watered down". By that time, it's pretty much 'luck of the draw' as to the true amount of mite resistance any given queen has. But as Bjorn has pointed out, if you're willing to pay the $50 per queen for queens more directly descendant from such programs as the SMR or Russian project, the higher the likelihood of becoming chemical free.

    I have ordered Russians from Jester Bees in Arkansas (who get their "breeder" queens from Glenn Apiaries). They, in turn, are open mated and so the resistance begins to get diluted; but the price has also dropped to $10 or $12 per queen. {NOT an endorsement of either operation} The real secret is to get away from AI (time consuming, labor intensive and $$costly$$) to where mating areas have plenty of Russian drones (using Russians, as an example). Once Russian drones are widespread within a queen breeder's mating areas, then the cost of the queens will come down and the genetic dilution (for non-mite resistance) will be minimized. Just now, are we starting to get to that point among most commercial queen breeders - this was always envisioned as a four or five year process by the USDA. This was as the USDA planned - they could have made the introduction of mite resistant genetics more widespread and much more quickly. But they were also walking a fine line so as not to destroy (financially) many commercial queen breeders. Thus the reasoning and control for the initial $500 queen releases to a very small group of selected queen breeders. [Too bad, the USDA just didn't get into the queen breeding effort wholesale and make the queens available to anyone and everyone who wanted one - drone populations sure would have become more widespread across the country much more quickly]. But again, the reality of economic and political pressures insure that the plan progresses according to what's acceptable to the USDA. To some extent, this also accounts for the wide variability of "good vs. bad" assessments of the Russian bees - no doubt in my mind that some beekeepers have had excellent results from the Russians and some beekeepers would swear never to buy them again! The only people who have experienced "first hand" what the Russians are really like, are the USDA personnel controlling their importation and the few selected queen breeders who paid the $500 price tag - everyone else is getting a mutt (some are lucky to get good mutts and some are not). My point here is, that once the cross breeding starts to happen, you loose control over identifying whether a certain characteristic is intrinsic to the Russian genetics or to the Italian (or whatever was the cross-breeder race) or if it's unique to the hybridized Russian queen only.
    --
    But just so the government folks don't EVER think they have absolute control over our borders and mother nature (and thus the introduction of such pests as AHBs, Varroa, fire ants, Japanese carp, small hive beetle, well the list goes on and on...), as I understand, some people have found ways to get fresh infusions of potentially mite resistant genetics across our borders, so the hope for "good" also exists. Sooner or later (assuming Darwin was right), mite resistance will become widespread - but until then, "buyer beware".

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    anaheim california USA
    Posts
    23

    Angry

    I Bought my queen from stracken bees.They say their queens are mite resistant but it doesn't seem to look that way. I'm treating them for verroa as we speak. I have never worked with such gentle bees as these & want to save them. So when someone says buy from a seller of mite resistant bees, bee careful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    carnica bee,
    I'm looking at two different ads for strachans as I write this, nowhere does it mention "mite resistant". They mention selecting for hygenics and mite resistance and other features. I believe there is no 100% mite resistant bees, and they certainly don't claim this. (did you lose bees, or just started treating when you found them with mites?) All bees, no matter what management items you use, will have mites. Unless you stopped them from bringing them into the hive all together. Thats not to say that bees can't handle mites and through selection processes, a better bee, capable of living or controlling mites will eventually win. Starting with queens, raised by breeders taking the time to see advantages of selecting survivor traits, is the future and will be the demise of all other treatments.

    We are not at 100%, but there are more and more beekeepers who are now 1-2-3 years chemical free(without all the other items also), and have minimized there winter varroa kill. They all started, I believe with good stock, many had there own high kill rates, but then through their own splitting and selection process, are now on the verge, or already there, of bees capable of handling the mites. Not all of these bees are russian.


  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

    Post

    Hi Carnica

    I don't have any secrets, really. I feed Honeybee Healthy in the late winter, then here in Kansas, I harvest my honey earlier then most around here so I can get started on treating for mites asap. And allowing them to get their winter supply built up real good so they have plenty stores for overwintering.

    And too, my hives are right outside my door and I keep a very close watch on them for the earliest possible intervention in the case of diseases... or robbing on weaker hives and ect...

    I don't treat them with drastic measures by common standards.. Others might not agree with me but I think I treat very moderately but more often.

    I bought mite resistant bees three years ago, lost some and grew the ones that survived, having been the strongest. I let them superceed. And such as that....


  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    anaheim california USA
    Posts
    23

    Smile

    Sounds great Daisy. It's a fact that healthier bees fight off illness better than sick ones. No secret here, just good bee management. By the way B-Jornbee, I didn,t mean to give strachan bees a bad rap. These by far are the best bees I have ever kept & will always buy more queens from them. I stand corrected. Your name seems to have a french twist to it. Am I right?

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,217

    Post

    >By the way B-Jornbee... Your name seems to have a french twist to it. Am I right?

    I always thought it had a Scandanavian twist to it.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    I'll forgive any reference to a "French" twist. I laughed and thought it was a "inside" joke, then realized that you haven't been around on this site long enough to know my history.

    M.B. is correct. Bjorn is scandanavian and means, among other things, "bear". It is part of my wife's name, she being from Denmark. Two things that my house is full of is, bears and bees. Stuffed items of course.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Round Top, New York - Northern Catskill Mtns.
    Posts
    1,895

    Post

    Mite resistance does not mean there are No Mites.
    The colony may still have mites but they can still survive. They may deal with the mites in many ways, but they survive inspite of them.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

    Post

    My father was a beekeeper back when there were no problems from mites(mid 70s-82). He also kept beep the old fashion way and in a couple of hives he made by hand as a early teen and most of his beekeeping is based on these early years in the TN foothills. I was 10 when we moved back to TN when he retired from the factory. The fear of mites which were being found in the area and the difficulty of moving the hives south he made a deal with a beekeeper there and never kept a bee since. I purchased 2 packages this past spring. I did get screened BBs and kept check on varroa. Late this fall I was only getting a couple per week. The first one I saw was in July. I did not check for T mites. I have mixed reviews of the bees I purchased. I got buckfast from R Weaver. One of the queens never did lay and they were kind and replaced her. The other queen that came with the packages was laying well within a week. Her hive was and is gentle and easy to work. The replacement queen they send layed well and was a hot hive to work. This hive grew much faster than the gentle bees but by July I could not pick blackberries 20 yards from the hives without getting stung. I used a frame of eggs from the gentle queen and a small split with only capped brood from the hot hive to raise my own queen.
    To the points, R Weaver's buckfast came with very few or no mites. They say they are selecting for resistance to varroa but the buckfast is know to be T mite resistant. These were the reason I chose them in the first place. The queen I raised from the gentle hive are more aggressive than the mother's colony but are noway mean. My father has been a good teacher of the basics(he turns 72in March) but I need a mentor for mite control and I have found 2 within driving range now and I have this board. I think natural cell size, resistance, and hygenic behavor are all pieces to the big picture. Yes many have been chem free using small cell. Yes some have even had good results from resistant strains. Hygenic behavor has been proven helpful. I plan on getting 2 types of bees this years by buying queens(2 each). I want russian and NWCarnolians. I am also going do do some small cell to start the regression. I went to college for horticulture and know that the offspring of a resistant plant is not going to be resistant everytime. With the Chestnut most of the offspring are not resistant to the blight. This does not say we need to give up on them it means the opposit. After many generations we will get there. I plan on helping bees and the Chestnuts get there by breeding from the survivors.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads