Results 1 to 18 of 18
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    waco, tx
    Posts
    528

    Post

    Hi guys

    When I try to mix 2:1 sugar syrup the sugar never all dissolves. Using a pedestal type Kitchenaid home mixer with the wire whip.

    Seems like back in the dark ages (bout 25 years ago when I had bees before) it was recommended to not heat the sugar syrup for some reason (seems like it had to do with caramelization of the sugar?) so I've been using hot water from the faucet, heating the mixer bowl with hot water so it doesn't cool the water when I pour it in but the room temp sugar cools the mixture enough that it never all dissolves.

    Any suggestions appreciated!

    Lew

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Winnipeg Manitoba
    Posts
    311

    Post

    I boil my water first.
    By the time I get the pot off of the burner, and the water poured into the mixer, its cooled suficiently to not carmalize the sugar.
    I also add a teaspoon of cream of tartar per 5 gallons to prevent crystalization. I don't know if thats effective, but an old timer taught me that, and it seems to do no harm.
    But heating syrup is bad news.
    One beekeeper I know doesnt care if the sugar dissolves or not. But he uses hive top feeders, wich I hate.

    J.R.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    waco, tx
    Posts
    528

    Post

    Thanks John

    Sounds like a good workable plan; need to mix sugar water tonight so I'll try it!

    Lew

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Post

    Well, to disolve sugar, you MUST have a hot liquid. At least from a chefs point of view.

    Take your water and bring it to a boil. Then turn off the heat and add all of the sugar. Stir it and than take the pot of the stove annd stir it some more and then let it cool.
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Langley, B.C. Canada
    Posts
    413

    Post

    Lew

    At first when I had a couple of hives I would bring the water to boil turn stove down to medium add sugar slow and stir,stir,stir after short while the syrup will become clear.
    Now I use hot water from the tap into garbage pail,add a little sugar at time ,I use 1/2" drill with a 3/8" or 1/2" rod iron bent into a cicle at the bottom works fine (not as clear

    Terry

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,582

    Post

    You have to boil the water to make 2:1. You can get by with tap water on 1:1. For 2:1 I boil the water, turn the heat to medium and add the sugar and stir until it's clear and turn off the heat.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Central Square, NY, Oswego County
    Posts
    814

    Post

    The secret is you have to keep stirring the water while adding the sugar if you have any heat on it. You don't want it to burn, since it will become poisonous to the bees. I heat my water and stirring it all the time when I'm feeding.
    Dan

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    waco, tx
    Posts
    528

    Post

    Thanks everyone!

    I heated the water to boiling & poured it into the mixer bowl that had the 2 pounds of room temp sugar in it & mixed at half speed for about 5-6 minutes. No noticeable grains (unless they settled over night; was already a little granulated in the feeder jars from before. The 1 swarm emptied two pint jars in 3 days; 2 more pints set out this morning.

    Thanks again!

    Lew

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    monroe, nc, US of A
    Posts
    29

    Post

    My two cents worth. I use a kitchen timer, spoon and pot large enough to more than hold 5# sugar and water necessary for proper mixture. Water and sugar go on stove together, stove is turned to high, for my pot and stove it takes 6 min. to bring mixture to full boil. The timer is set when the stove is turned on and buzzes 6 min. later. The stove is turned off, the mixture stired with the spoon a few times untill the mixture turns clear( about 15 sec.) and poured in to a 5 galon bucket, then the proces is started again. The timer keeps me from forgeting and having the mixture cook down to a burnt mess. Senior moments you know.
    Has any had experence with the cream of tartar as an anti crystal agent? Sounds interesting.
    HAR

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,582

    Post

    Most of the recent discussion of cream of tarter and of heating syrup is about how bad it is for the bees because of invert sugar. I have not tried it.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Farmington, New Mexico
    Posts
    6,717

    Post

    I heated the water to boiling & poured it into the mixer bowl that had the 2 pounds of room temp sugar...
    I notice you are pouring the water into the sugar rather than pouring the sugar into the water. Back in my drilling days, a new roughneck quickly learned to pour the dry stuff into the barrel filled with water rather than dumping the dry chemicals into the barrel and then adding water. It seemed to mix more easily and, depending on what you were mixing, avoided blowbacks and explosions. (At least that's the way I remember it)Don't know if the same holds with sugar and water, but I always add dry sugar to a big pot of hot water and it seems to always dissolve completely and clearly.
    Nobody ruins my day without my permission, and I refuse to grant it...

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    waco, tx
    Posts
    528

    Post

    Thanks Coyote

    The reason for doing this is the design of the Kitchenaid mixer I use. The beater I use is the wire whip & the way a Kitchenaid is made the beater goes in a spiral around the inside of the bowl instead of rotating the bowl. I think (am very hesitant to try it) the spinning whip would make a big mess slinging sugar every time it comes around to the area you're pouring the dry sugar into.

    I was actually surprised adding it all at once worked; was afraid of clumps but it did fine.

    Lew

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,582

    Post

    >Back in my drilling days, a new roughneck quickly learned to pour the dry stuff into the barrel filled with water rather than dumping the dry chemicals into the barrel and then adding water.

    I've carried hod (along with every other job in construction) and it works that way mixing mud for brick too. [img]smile.gif[/img] First the water, then the morar mix and sand.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
    Posts
    2,368

    Post

    <<depending on what you were mixing, avoided blowbacks and explosions.>>

    Some concentrated chemicals generate quite a bit of heat when mixed with water. "Always add chemicals TO water" is drilled into every beginner at the cheese factory where I work, particularly sanitation workers using caustics. That way, the intense heat is dissipated through the water, rather than the water flashing into steam, causing an explosion.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

    Post

    So far I use my coffee pot to make syrup. I pour the water from the coffee maker into either a gallon pitcher or gallon pickle jar then add the sugar. As long as the jars have been sitting in the house at room temp it works great. I do not fill the jar/pitcher all the way full(one reason is size of coffee pot) so I close the lid loosely and shish the water around to warm the air inside then close it tight and shake it hard. I have a good washing machine with the timer broke off during a move and thought about using it like I read in an old bee book(the picture was of an electric ringer type). The pump could pump the syrup into a barrel on a trailer behind the 4 wheeler to make feeding alot of hives easier(plan to reach 30 hives by fall and have 10 over wintering + a nuc). I would need someway of metering the water though which could be as simple as a water line run up high with a hose bib and a bucket. Since I have power there I also thought about running the water through a hot water heater turned up(you have to be careful not to boil the water in the tank and blow steam water out of the over flow. Those that have a honey house may like the idea of having a water heater turned up(you would not want this going to sinks as it will scald).

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Lincolnton Ga. USA.
    Posts
    1,725

    Post

    what do yall put in the syrup to keep it or the feed jar from turning green from mold or algie?
    Ted

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
    Posts
    2,368

    Post

    The best is just to put it in the bees

    But the mold won't hurt, as long as it isn't fermenting.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,582

    Post

    I just don't make it up until I plan to use it. If I make any ahead of time, it's always 2:1. I can water it down when I feed. 2:1 keeps pretty well. Much better than 1:1.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads