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  1. #1

    Big Grin

    Hi all, very new to the world of bees....would love it if you would share with me...best decision/worse mistake. I would especially like to hear from those of you in my neck of the woods..Coastal Virginia. (But I would love to hear any advice Ya'll care to share) NB

  2. #2

    Post

    The worst thing I ever did (to date) was to brag to some "city" friends about how passive my bees were while standing next to the hive. To show off I decided to remove the empty hive top feeder without smoke. That was something I did and still do regularly. Apparently the bees overheard the conversation and needless to say they didn't appreciate me taking the feeder. The next several minutes were a hellish blur of wings and buzzing. Several futile swatting attempts were made. People running, arms flailing, trying desperatly to seek the safety that did not exhist. Did I mention that we were all in t-shirts and shorts? At one point someone dropped trou' and began rolling around as if on fire. When my next rational thought came, we were all some how in my garage with the doors closed. Another time I made a similar comment to my wife and literally seconds later she got stung on the eyelid! We weren't even near the hives. She's convinced it was a "jealousy" sting.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,785

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,361

    Post

    I keep a daily log and every now and then I update the 'Major Stupid Mistakes'section.Usually mistakes in management.When you make a mis-judgement write it down,so you can remember to do it again next year!
    Really,though,everyone has to work out a system that works for them in the area they keep bees in.It wont be the same as mine or anyone elses for that matter.We can only learn by educating ourselves on what others have done,and then make our own mistakes as we work out the system.And here I would like to recommend the best book ever written on management-Honey Getting,by E.L.Sechrist,long out of print unfortunately.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    2,785

    Post

    First of all, the post by John was one of the funniest stories I've read in quite sometime. Thanks for the laugh!!

    newbeekeeper,

    Looks like we're in the same area. The best decision I've made was to join the local beekeeper's club - lots of very knowledgeable and friendly people very willing to provide guidance. I've only been in the hobby about 1.5 years and fortunately haven't made too many big mistakes, but if I had to start again I would choose a different race of bee (my Starlines with postal on me this year). Also, I should have paid more attention to that little black beetle I saw in my hive a month or two after I introduced the new package!
    Last edited by Barry; 07-10-2011 at 04:12 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    ATL, GA, USA
    Posts
    70

    Post

    Best Decision: Buying the bees.

    Worst Mistake: Without veil or gloves, I scooped up some bees that were hanging around the hive entrance and dropped them on top of some flowers I wanted them to discover- They were more interested in my ear... ouch !

    [This message has been edited by GAbee (edited June 30, 2003).]

  7. #7
    mmundy Guest

    Big Grin

    Like John, I bragged. I told this family of Mom, Dad and several kids that the bees only sting if pinched or tumbled, never if flicked away. I said that if a bee hovers about them, it is just checking them out... be calm I said and they won't harm you. I opened the hive at dusk while they stood around me, completely trusting me... Next thing I knew I was stung on the tip of the nose and had one in my hair. I ran through the yard screaming and smacking myself on the head. One got in my shirt through the placket. I went inside and took my shirt off and began inspecting my nose. Meanwhile, my cat attempted to eat the bee from my shirt and it got stung in the mouth. That was unforgetable!
    Last edited by Barry; 07-10-2011 at 04:12 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Sandhills NC
    Posts
    111

    Post

    Best thing I ever did was to join my county bee club. Some of these people have been beekeepers for 60yrs and the average is 30yrs. So I ahve all this "information" just for the asking and even though I think I amuse them with my 'stupid questions' they all was take time to answer or show me how!

    The worst thing I ever did was to tell my dear husband that the bees would not sting him if he would not swat at them! They made a liar out of me! I had longer said it when a bee came over and stung him through his beesuit, on the arm just above his glove and below his shirt sleeve. He does not like my bees and they do not like him! I can be standing right next to them and he can be 10ft. away and they will find him!!!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Wyoming MN
    Posts
    406

    Post

    The dumbest thing I think I did was to start out my first year with 5 hives. Two is good, but 5 was way too many for this beginner. It was an overwhelming summer.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Parkersburg WV. USA
    Posts
    19

    Post

    The best thing I have done is to get started keeping bees. The worst waiting til I was 35 years old. The dummest was picking up my first hive, and setting it on the tailgate to screen the entrance. Oh yeah no smoker no veil.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,361

    Post

    Driving 20 miles to move a yard of bees,and discovering there were no matches or lighters in the truck.Did you know that emptying gunpowder out of a .308 cartridge onto burlap and trying to arc a spark from an electric fence doesnt work.Did you know that a highway flare will light it(now how to put out the **** flare....)
    Finding a low battery on an electric fence and thinking "heck ,the bees have been here 2 months with no problem,surely I can take this battery home and charge it".That night...

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
    Posts
    1,966

    Post

    55 years ago I had a hive of bees located on the back of a wagon. As the summer wore on it got heavier. The boy that I was, was quite able to clamber up there to work them. I used a hive cover to sit on next to them. All of a sudden the hive got too heavy for the wagon and it tetter-tottered down, dumping me and the entire hive in the field. (At least 3 stories!) I hit about 30MPH going through the swamp.

    Dickm

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Post

    i once left a 5 gallon bucket that was 1/2 full of honey with the lid not on tight,when i looked at it after several days ,i'd discovered i had made an excellent trap for drowning field bees,there must have been thousands of them dead,about enough to make you cry.

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