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Thread: Help

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
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    I have never been to a health food store that didn't carry essential oils. It's a pretty good bet you can find them there too.

  2. #22
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    Dec 2002
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    Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany
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    Ian
    your absolutely right but we have a different system and rules. When we like to sell honey officially we have to sell it in a special jar with a ribbon. And we must be organist in a bee club the only way we can buy the ribbon from the Deutsche Imkerbund.
    Each beekeeper has the own serial number on the ribbons and the officials can easy find out where the honey comes from. This institute is making spot-checks every year from each bee club and we beekeeper have to send honey to there labs for all kinds of testing. They find out what kind and amount of chemicals are in honey and on the pollen tests they find out whether beekeeper selling there own or honey from oversea countries. Even if we selling oversea honey mixed in our jars we are in trouble.
    We can buy oversea honey from supermarket but this stuff is in different jars. Not declared “honey from the local beekeeper” and even this honey need tests from government before selling in stores.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
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    >>like to sell honey officially we have to sell it in a special jar with a ribbon.
    >>Each beekeeper has the own serial number on the ribbons and the officials can easy find out where the honey comes from

    That is an interesting concept. It guarentees the public of a pureness, and a garenteed locally produced honey product.
    The honey I sell out of my honeyhouse does not have to be tested. The trust is in the hands of the beekeeper, and I feel Canadian beekeeper keep a very high standard and we promote the high integerty of our product. All the surplus honey I produce is sold to the local honey coop,BeeMaid honey. They test all honey shipped into them and are looking for Quality to which they pay me accordingly. All the honey is tested for antibiotic residues and if any such redidues are found in the honey, it is shipped back to me my expense. I cant tell you what the tolerances are for the residues, but I assure you, they are very sticky.


    >>we must be organist in a bee club

    This part of your statement is where you lost me. I assume you are meaning that you are producing your honey organically. It all makes sence if that is the case. Our organic producers have to follow much the same corse of scrutiny as you discribed, that is to be sure they are producing a turely organic product.
    And honestly, organic food production, is a load of crap. I am a farmer, and take great pride in the food I produce. Organic food promotion is but a slap in my face.
    Organic food is marketed with the false assumption that it is a "healthier" and a "safer" food. Hats off to the marketing commity for organic food. They have gotten everyone beleiving such the very fact, but in fact, they have no facts. There is no reputable scientific data which will back such a claim.
    Not only that, there is also the claim that organic production is healthier for the environment. Also a load of crap. It is truely an unsustainable form of agriculture, in food production terms. Land is farmed as it was back in the 30's, weed ridden and stripped of nutrients. Cattle go without vacinations or antibiotics treatment, which may lead to turely unhealthy unproductive contagious herds(I have seen what a unvacinated heard looks like. BVD will wipe out most of your calf crop leaving the survivors sickly). And beekeeping goes without bacterial disease contol. A very hard problem to remidy. Only an operation of very small scale can produce organically and not run into any of these problems. Anyhow,just my thoughts...

    Ian

    [This message has been edited by Ian (edited January 29, 2004).]

  4. #24
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    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
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    I think he means " we must organize a bee club in order to buy the ribbons "

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
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    I thought the same as Ian, but Scott must be right. I think he means "And we must be ORGANIZED in a bee club(,) the only way we can buy the ribbon from the Deutsche Imkerbund."

    Hang in there Axtmann, you're doing something I can't. I still havent mastered one language yet.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany
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    Ian
    it is not aloud to sell the honey as an organic product because beekeepers have no control where bees getting the nectar from. Farmers spraying there fruit trees and there is always the possibility that bees bringing contaminated pollen in there hives.
    If we would go for the “crap” organic we must guarantee that there is absolute no agriculture land or a settlement in a distant of I think at least 5 or more km. This is in Germany almost impossible.
    We have very strong rules; whenever someone produces a food product he can’t do it without the eyes of the government.

    >>>All the honey is tested for antibiotic residues and if any such redidues are found in the honey, it is shipped back to me my expense. I cant tell you what the tolerances are for the residues, but I assure you, they are very sticky.<<<

    . I remember in the late 70’ or early 80’ arrived a whole shipload with tons of honey from somewhere in Kanada and failed the tests. There was almost no pollen and than they find out that most of this so-called honey was made from plain sugar. Some Kanadian commercial beekeeper was feeding hundreds or thousands of colonies with sugar and extracted the honey. The result …. the officials here send the shipload back to the sender.
    The disaster was all over in the news and an excellent advertising for the local beekeepers. I still wonder who was eating this “honey” at the end?

    Without the membership in a bee club no ribbons and no registration numbers. That mean nobody here can sell honey on a marked or official to people. It would bring you a court case within hours.
    We have NO possibilities to use antibiotic against AFB. All antibiotics are prohibited in food production. Whatever you produce, cattle, chicken, eggs, pigs or honey. If a farmer needs medication for his sick animals the vet has to inspect it and there is no way to sell the meet until the vet give him the ok.

    If I would use antibiotics and they would found it in my honey, there is no shipment back to me. I would end up in jail.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
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    Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany
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    Thanks Bill
    Sometimes is hard for me…. thinking and writing in a second language.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
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    >> remember in the late 70’ or early 80’ arrived a whole shipload with tons of honey from somewhere in Kanada and failed the tests. There was almost no pollen and than they find out that most of this so-called honey was made from plain sugar. Some Kanadian commercial beekeeper was feeding hundreds or thousands of colonies with sugar and extracted the honey. The result …. the officials here send the shipload back to the sender.

    Sounds like a good case of fraud to me. Those kind of beekeepers are a discrase to the beekeeping community.

    >>I still wonder who was eating this “honey” at the end?

    The packer I send my honey to tests all honey comming in before further processing it. Are you saying there are honey packers out there who don't test their honey for impurities or adulteration? Somehow I doubt it.

    >>We have NO possibilities to use antibiotic against AFB. All antibiotics are prohibited in food production.

    Antibiotics are prohibited in our food also, but that does not mean we cant use them. Strict guidelines are used and followed to minimize any residual anti or chem in our foods. And all of our govn't testing has shown to be ture. Our tolerances are accepted by all our trading partners, even Germany. And our food has been proven to be even a fraction of the tolerances allowable.
    My best dark (Buckwheat) honey is exported to Germany. I use Oxytetracyclen during the colony build up period to prevent AFB/EFB establishment. My honey has never been sent back, or even commented on antibiotic residues in it, because there is none...

    >>If I would use antibiotics and they would found it in my honey, there is no shipment back to me. I would end up in jail.

    Pritty extreem out there in Germany.
    My neighbours are from Holland. They come to Canada to farm, why? Too much burocratic crap. Happy to have them as neighbours.

    Ian

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