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Thread: Help

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    anaheim california USA
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    Sad

    Hi everyone.I Checked on my bees on Saturday & noticed lots of bees in front on the landing board dying & some just lethargically roaming around close to death. I'm currently treating for verroa & heard that there are some bee viruses that affect bees in this manner. The queen is laying brood. I dont know if these might be emerging bees that are infected. I also noticed bees on the ground walking away from the hive, their bodies seem to be in perfect shape, no deformites. Thank you for any feed back.

  2. #2
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    Sep 2003
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    mountain home, ar, usa
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    The bees that are walking away from the hive (without deformaties) are full of Trachea mites. You'll notice that they will occasionally lift a wing so that the smaller "under" wing shows (they call this K-wing). My first guess is that you have italian bees, or an italian-derived race. Trachea mites can wipe out a hive, but most likely they won't. If you're not seeing any with deformed wings, then you have varroa under control. Once the new bees start replacing the old ones, you won't notice many trachea mite problems anymore.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
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    Question

    carnica bee:

    What are you "currently" doing for varroa mites?
    How did you treat for tracheal mites?

    Indications of T-mites include:
    1) Dwindling population
    2) Weak bees crawling on ground w/ K-wings
    3) Abandoned hive in spring w/ plenty of stores

    To determine if you have T-mites, you must dissect bees or send a sample for testing.

    Symptoms of varroasis are many and can be confused w/ other diseases, but include:
    1) Disfigured, stunted adult bees, w/ deformed legs or wings or both.

    MONITOR natural V-mite fall regularly (at least monthly) using Screened Bottom Board w/ Sticky Board.

    ------------------
    Dave W . . .

    A NewBEE with 1 hive.
    First package installed
    April, 2003.

  4. #4
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    Jan 2004
    Location
    anaheim california USA
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    23

    Post

    Thanks for the reply Curry. I hope you are right.Dave I'm currently using apistan for my verroa problem. I never dealt with tracheal mites so I never had to treat them. I guess time will tell. Boy, what happened to the good old days......

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
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    2,837

    Question

    Sorry, Im having a problem w/ "currently".
    As I look out my door at things ice-covered, its hard for me to imagine the "ideal" weather of Anaheim.

    When using Apistan, the package states; "For best chemical distribution, use strips when daytime high temperatures are at least
    50oF".

    Today, Now, this very instant, do you "currently" have Apistan strips in your hive?

    If you think your bees are "sick", you could submit a sample NOW, and if your bees die, based on lab results, you might know why.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
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    6,241

    Post

    >>The bees that are walking away from the hive (without deformaties) are full of Trachea mites. You'll notice that they will occasionally lift a wing so that the smaller "under" wing shows (they call this K-wing).


    Bingo, you got your diagnosis. Menthol or Formic acid, if you are allowed to use it, will take care of the problem. I have even heard that a scoup of lard/sugar on the top frames of you brood chamber season long will decrease your T mite problem. I have been doing it and my neigbous have been using it and it seems to work. Cheap, no residues, but not proven. Apperently it will block the mating cents of the T mites and the M and F cant find eachother.?? I dont really know

    Ian

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
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    Post

    When I first started, I put grease patties on the hives all year round. Just something someone said I should do. I went three years before I lost my first hive. And thats with not alot of anything else other than fall feeding. Nothing scientific, but I feel there is something to the grease patties, and although not a big fan of the fogger, I do believe that oil/grease in some manner, goes a long way in the health of a hive. The crisco is suppose to mask the mites ability to select young bees, but perhaps it is rubbed on the bees and increases the cleansing effect also. Regardless of what the "truth" is, I have been putting the patties back in. Its a way of feeding if nothing else. It certainly can't hurt.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    There is a good chance that whatever you do it will be too late. But the grease patties won't hurt (sugar and crisco mixed up like greasy icing). You could make an Oxalic Acid evaporator like BWrangler uses and fog them heavy with that.

    The problem is they are infected with a virus by now and all of this may not help enough.

  9. #9
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    Nov 2003
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    Williston, NC, USA
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    Playing devil's advocate here: I read someplace--can't remember where--that grease patties attract SHB.

  10. #10
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    Nov 2003
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    McMinnville, TN, USA
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    What ratio of crisco/sugar do you use? What cositancy(sp) if you do not measurements. I plan on using them this spring as a prevention.

  11. #11
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    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    >Playing devil's advocate here: I read someplace--can't remember where--that grease patties attract SHB.

    I have heard that too. But beehives attract SHB too.

    I quite using them when I started fogging FGMO.
    http://www.beesource.com/ubb/Forum3/HTML/000062.html

    Here's my recipe.

    1 lb Crisco
    3 lbs Granulated Sugar
    25 drops of wintergreen oil.

    You leave out the wintergreen oil, but it boosts their immune system and helps with the virus and does a bit more to cover the smell of young bees.


  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
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    Post

    You might also want to check out BWranglers recepie with the secret ingredent. (vitamin C) Go to his web site.
    www.geocities.com/usbwrangler/

    Hope that works, favorites wouldn't let me copy and paste.

  13. #13
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    Apr 2003
    Location
    Lenexa, Kansas
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    Post

    Do you put the grase patties at the entrance, or inside the hive?

    I am interested in using them, also.

  14. #14
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    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    I put them on the top bars in the middle of the brood nest. It's the young nurse bees that the Tracheal mites are looking for and that is where they live.

  15. #15
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    Dec 2002
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    Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany
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    The secret ingredient vitamin C doesn’t help the bees to getting health. Vitamin C is citric acid and can be used to tread against Varroa like oxalic acid. It has the same effect but cost a lot more than OA. Citric acid has bin tested in Germany in the 90’ with all the other natural acids (lactic acid, formic acid or oxalic acid). There is no harm to bees or anything else but Varroa don’t like it.

    Since I’m on this forum I find out that some of you guys in the US put a lot of stuff in your colonies without knowing whether there is residues in honey or not. Some even have there secret in mixing different things together.

    I think some using even untested or a high amount (overdosing) of permitted chemicals and has no possibilities to find out what’s left in their honey or how it works on bees and mites.
    Whatever this people doing to their “pets” they should think about the product (honey) they are selling as food to other people!

    The Bee institute in Liebenfels Switzerland has a lot of test results available if someone is interested please go to there website. http://www.apis.admin.ch/deutsch/pdf/Varroa/oele_d.pdf

    I couldn’t find the results in English, so if someone is interested I will try to translate the tabulations.
    On one of the tabulation you can see that Thymol kills 100% of the Varroa but can also kill (depend on the dosage) up to 95% of your bees. That’s with most of all medications they can help or destroy depended on the dosage. And who of us know what the right dosage is?

    Michael I don’t want to teach an old beekeeper but I think you can save the money for 1 lb Crisco 3 lbs Granulated Sugar. Wintergreen oil is one of only a few essential oils (from over 150 differed essential oils) with a good result in fight against any mites and your 25 drops of oil doing their work. 25 drops on a paper towel placed on top of the brood frames working well. Bees removing the paper after the oil are evaporated and it can be replaced if necessary.



  16. #16
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    Aug 2002
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    >Michael I don’t want to teach an old beekeeper but I think you can save the money for 1 lb Crisco 3 lbs Granulated Sugar. Wintergreen oil is one of only a few essential oils (from over 150 differed essential oils) with a good result in fight against any mites and your 25 drops of oil doing their work. 25 drops on a paper towel placed on top of the brood frames working well. Bees removing the paper after the oil are evaporated and it can be replaced if necessary.

    Some people use just the grease patties with good result, with no essential oils.

    I haven't used the grease patties since I started fogging with the FGMO. I haven't had any apparent problems with Tracheal Mites since I started the FGMO and dropped the grease patties. So I'm not spending my money on that.

    I believe the Oxalic also will kill the Tracheal mites? I fogged most of the hives in my back yard twice this fall with Oxalic Acid.

  17. #17
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    Nov 2003
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    McMinnville, TN, USA
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    I am going to use the grease patties because I have not the money to buy a fogger. I only have 2 hives that on inspection a couple days ago were doing real well with plenty of stores to get them to spring each with a couple of frames of brood. I plan on doing my first splits mid March. I have Buckfast bees which are suppose to be T mite resistant. I had both of the hives on screen till early winter(after we had our first freeze). V mite counts have been real low. I am some what ashamed that I did not even try and look for T mites. They do seem to be in perfect health though. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Maple will be blooming in 2 to 3 weeks here and there is still pollen in the combs so I think I am save to say both of my hives have made it thru winter. Crisco and sugar will not hurt me if a little gets into the honey. I do not know if I can find the oils mentioned but will be looking( I hope they are cheap).

  18. #18
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    >The secret ingredient vitamin C doesn’t help the bees to getting health. Vitamin C is citric acid and can be used to tread against Varroa like oxalic acid.

    Bwrangler was using it to stimulate the bees' interest in pollen patties and pollen substitute.

    >I do not know if I can find the oils mentioned but will be looking( I hope they are cheap).

    I have not see wintergreen cheap. Peppermint and lemongrass are much cheaper. I bought my wintergreen online but the company since went out of business.
    http://www.naturesoils.com/essentialoils.htm http://www.eepl.com/mentholindia/p4.htm http://www.everydayhenna.com/index.html?oils.html

    and Clints hint from his forum entry for a "Honey Bee Healthy" like recipe:

    "Essential Oils:

    LorAnn Oils
    4518 Aurelius Road
    P.O. Box 22009
    Lansing, Michigan 48909
    (517) 882-0215
    or toll free
    1-800 248-1302
    or by fax
    (517) 882-0507
    The last I purchased was Spearmint oil 1 ounce for $3.99
    Be sure to mention that you are a Beekeeper to get the cheaper prices.
    They seem to have it all in stock and a lot of great info on the oils used for beekeeping
    Clint"

  19. #19
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    Jan 2003
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    Manitoba Canada
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    >>some of you guys in the US put a lot of stuff in your colonies without knowing whether there is residues in honey or not. Some even have there secret in mixing different things together.

    I think some using even untested or a high amount (overdosing) of permitted chemicals and has no possibilities to find out what’s left in their honey or how it works on bees and mites.


    Thats quite the conclusion. I doubt any country is excempt from the mishandling of tested and untested honeybee hive treatments, even Germany....


    Ian

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Germantown, TN
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    23

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    You might check with your local or hometown pharmacy for the spearmint oil. Sometimes they can order certain oils is they don't have them on the shelf. I would recommend using a smaller pharmacy versus the big guys like Walgreens, etc. The small guys seem to have a little more time and would make the effort to get it. Just my thoughts though!

    ------------------

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