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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

    Post

    It's easier to raise bees in certain areas right?

    Is it true that in raising larger cell bees that some areas require more management then others for mites and ect.? You know, more prone to diseases then in other areas?

    Has there been any statistics created that show this?

    Thx

  2. #2
    BILLY BOB Guest

    Post

    I'm sure it is true.

    I couldn't find it for lack of time, but I do know that Dee had a link on here that showed the different sizes of natural cell size in our country. It seames that the different areas did have a difference in cell size I'm sure some of this is because of the location and not the race. even though the race of the bees does make a difference also.

    Here are some links and quots from them:
    www.beesource.com/pov/lusby/meetlusby.htm

    "Historically, man-made foundation started the same size as the size bees naturally produced. However, the cell size bees naturally produce is to some degree dependent on where in the world they are. Like many animals, those closer to the equator tend to be smaller than those closer to the poles. That is, honey bees in the southern U.S. naturally build cells a tiny bit smaller than bees in Canada. This discovery has complicated what is 'natural,' but not the fact that natural is still, well, natural."
    www.beesource.com/pov/lusby/part3.htm

    "It is important for beekeepers today to keep in mind that there are basically only three major races of honeybees in Europe: 1) Carnolian 2) Italian and 3) Mellifera (the dark bee). Caucasian honeybees are from Eurasia. These are the main races and strains of honeybees to be found in our United States. All of these races are excellently adapted to the original climate and nectar plants of their respected areas, but unfortunately if exported to another area or climate, let's say a different continent, these major races very soon break down by natural selection and are hybridized, if left by themselves without man's interference, into new strains and then races, fully adapted to the new climate and nectar plants of their adopted new geographical areas. All three of the major races of bees from Europe have played key roles in beekeeping in the Americas along with the lone caucasian bees from Eurasia (Asia Minor)."

    Ihope this helps and I'll keep looking for some more.

    BB

    [This message has been edited by BILLY BOB (edited September 24, 2003).]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

    Post

    wow, thanks BB.

    I hadn't expected you to go to all that trouble for me. ;^)

    Sincerely

  4. #4
    BILLY BOB Guest

    Post

    Only for you Daisy Only for you.

    BB

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