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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    45,827

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    Since I am the moderator and since people often ask specific questions expecting timely answers, this is to let you know I'll be gone to HAS (Heartland Apiculture Society) the rest of the week and won't be back online, probably, until the 11th. Of course I will check in sooner if I get the opportunity. So if I don't answer, don't assume I'm ignoring you. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    If you're near to Edwardsville, IL, why not come? [img]smile.gif[/img]
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,827

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    HAS was a wonderful conference. Many of you went and already know that. It was great to meet so many of you and put names with faces and great to get to talk bees for several days with other addicts. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    My thanks to all who helped make HAS a wonderful experience. Thanks to the all vendors who came so far, especially David Eyre, of Beeworks, who came all the way from Ontario to share his experience and his unique products. Thanks to all the speakers. Thanks to all the volunteers who worked so hard. And especially thanks to Robin Mountain for doing so much work to help make it all happen.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Farmington, New Mexico
    Posts
    6,533

    Post

    What did you bring us?
    Nobody ruins my day without my permission, and I refuse to grant it...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    St. Clair, Mo.
    Posts
    133

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    HAS was outstanding. I enjoyed myself immensely. It was a pleasure meeting you, Michael, and several others here on Beesource. I took 3 of Michael's classes and they were very enlightening. I plan on incorporating lots of ideas I heard this weekend into my operation. I also enjoyed David Eyre's queen rearing class. He has pretty much convinced me to try my hand at rearing my own local queens someday-plus, he was a hoot! The only downside I can see to HAS 2005 was the fact that it did not last a week so I could take every class! I did't want to go home. I am thinking seriously about going to HAS in Indiana next year, and maybe some other conferences. I highly recommend it to anyone.
    \"Home is where the hive is.\"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,525

    Post

    Okay y'all. We want more detail than that. We wanna see something like, "I learned that keeping a frame of foundation/foundationless in the hive absolutely prevents swarming because it satisfies a need to build comb."

    Now that's what a report should look like. Don't keep all the goodies to yourselves.

    Hawk
    KC0YXI

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    St. Clair, Mo.
    Posts
    133

    Post

    Ok Hawk, lets see...

    First off, Michael made quite an arguement for small cell/foundationless comb. Not that that is new to anyone here, but being from the "Show Me State", I sometimes take a little more convincing. I am also considering building a TBH to play around with.
    David Eyre was an advocate for producing your own queens bred for your local conditions. Economically it made a lot of sense, plus he is convinced that we have and will continue to have a problem with AHB genes in our southern bred queens. I can attest to that, having gone a round or two with queens from a Texas supplier(not Weaver) that wanted me dead at all costs. I almost quit beekeeping my second year because of it. They were that bad. His class on the Nicot/Jenter style of queen raising was exceptional. I am contemplating buying a breeder queen and starting my own program. Fascinating stuff!
    I learned from Diana Sammarato the importance of monitoring mites while using IPM techniques. Also not a new concept, but it helped to hammer home what I was not doing enough of. She also was very excited about the availability of formic acid in the form of Mite-Away II this year. So, I bought a ten pack to try this fall. She also elaborated on the new fungus trials, and how the difficulties of producing results in a production model were proving difficult, so don't hold your breath. Also, she is currently working on an Oxcilic Acid study, to try and bring a packaged form to the US.
    I also took Bill Troup's(Maryland inspector) class on disease recognition. He actually had a nuc box full of AFB infected frames to look at and smell. That was quite helpful, since I have no prior experience with it.
    More than anything though, it was not the specifics, but the chance to hang out with 300 other Beeks and have a good time. [img]smile.gif[/img]
    \"Home is where the hive is.\"

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,525

    Post

    Now THAT's a report!!! You da man,Big Ed. There's so much to think about in that report that I can't just say, "Yeah, jenter looks good but costs more than it should."

    I thik we all should produce our own queens and purchase just for missing traits. That means a genetic reason to get something we don't have. And we should have spare queens. Probably four each. Two for me and two for the bk club members who can't think for themselves. Make em pay.

    Monitoring is a whole page of questions. Did Ms. Sammarato say how often? I'm constantly rethinking that one.

    I don't need to smell AFB again, but I'm sorry I missed the chance to hang with y'all. Maybe next year.

    Thanks again,

    Hawk
    KC0YXI

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    St. Clair, Mo.
    Posts
    133

    Post

    Hawk,
    She didn't give a specific timetable other than the usual late summer/fall peak, but I did get the impression it would be beneficial to monitor periodically to get a baseline for that hive and to monitor all hives at one time(if possible). I really need to learn and perfect other sampling techniques other than my old standby of sticky boards, such as the sugar shake or ether roll method. I think I will try the sugar one first, as it is non-lethal and supposedly very accurate.

    As far as queen rearing goes, I have been thinking of raising queens for myself and possibly selling a few queens and nucs for awhile now. I just am a little stronger in my convictions now. Why not? Would my queens be any different, using breeder queens from the same sources as they use? Except that my queens would be fresh, and not shoved into a mailing cage and shipped across the country for several days. With the periodic infusion of new blood and selected local traits, I think it is a win-win situation. I have had so much trouble with queen mortality and supercedure in the past three years, I have felt like pulling my hair out. Not to mention the hundreds of dollars flushed down the toilet. So what have I got to lose? 200 dollars in a graftless system and a breeder queen? Thats what I spent this year on queens and multiple replacements.
    \"Home is where the hive is.\"

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,525

    Post

    Kindred spirits. Be sure to get the sugar roll victims from the brood frames. Also it's powdered not granulated sugar. I'm always afraid I'm gonna roll the queen. I'm probably over valueing her anyway. Especially if I can raise my own. Maybe this paranoia will go away. See, queen raising is good for your mental health.

    See ya,

    Hawk
    KC0YXI

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    St. Clair, Mo.
    Posts
    133

    Post

    Oops,
    I wasn't done with my post. I am a firefighter on duty tonight and someone just had the audacity to burn up their SUV while I was in the middle of a train of thought!
    I was going to add that I was told to offer all surrounding beekeepers(I have at least 2) your queens for free or reduced price to help get the mating genetics in your area as pure as possible. Dunno, sounds good. I realize that will not be 100%, but might stack the deck in your favor. Also, it would be a great learning experience about bees in general. Once again, what do you have to lose.?
    \"Home is where the hive is.\"

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,525

    Post

    You know, Colorado is pretty close to St. Clair....
    I'm a volunteer so I know how it goes. Try getting off work to work a brush fire. Twice in the last week. Oh and this morning a three car rollover on the way home. Three patients. Three EMTs. My lucky day.

    If i know of four inactive former beekeepers who still have their equipment, maybe a reduced price on queens would pull em back in. Make it too cheap and they won't see any value in it. I'll have to think on it. Sounds like a plan so far. Just gotta decide how much discount.

    Hawk
    KC0YXI

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Post

    One poor kid came to the disease workshop, took
    one whiff of the AFB infected combs, and said
    "Uh oh I've smelled that before."

    She was heartbroken. We all insisted that she
    not over-react, but instead ask someone with
    more experience to help her inspect her hives.

    It is interesting that a full 1/3 of the workshops
    were about various aspects of basic bee biology.
    It seems that many who attended had a good
    grounding in "practical beekeeping", but were
    suddenly enthusiastic about "what's under the
    hood" of their bees when exposed to these
    workshops. That's a good thing.

    ...and the local watering hole, the "Stagger Inn",
    had THREE different single malts. The band
    playing that night kinda sucked, but that was easy
    to cure via application of additional whiskey.

    Even the hives in the apiary were amazingly
    calm. All in all, a very good meeting.

    I guess I could say that everyone got something
    "jackhammered" into them, couldn't I? ^.^

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    St. Clair, Mo.
    Posts
    133

    Post

    Hi Jim,
    I was glad to have met you at HAS(I was the Ex-"Jarhead" you talked to outside). I too was pleasantly suprised at the gentleness of the hives there. Wish mine were always like that.
    By the way, I used Bee-Quick to pull my supers yesterday, and my neighbor wanted to know why my honey smelled so good!(She was standing next to the fume boards in my truck).
    I know this was brought up in another post, but I used one of those black plastic boards(Mann Lake) along with 2 metal topped ones, and it worked just fine for me. I know you had a question about them, just my 2 cents.
    \"Home is where the hive is.\"

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