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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Liberty, MO USA
    Posts
    57

    Question

    As a city dweller with a "no beekeeping" ordinance in place, I found a nice place for a hive a few miles out of town. I am wanting to expand with additional hives and also move my existing hive to another location. I currently don't know anyone that has land available. Any suggestions in finding new hive locations in my area?

    Anyone else have this problem?

    Thanks,
    Darin

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,427

    Post

    It's harder now than it used to be. Used to be the person living in the farm house on a farm was the farmer/landowner. If they weren't they were the hired hand and knew the farmer. Now it's probably someone who bought the farm house and doesn't know the landowner. You could still try stopping at a farm house and asking. Sometimes you follow a trail of leads far enough you find the person you want to talk to.

    Probably a better idea is to run an advertisement in the local farm paper and offer to put hives on someones place. Some people want some for better pollenation.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    napoleon ohio
    Posts
    769

    Post

    You might want to try some one who has produce or an orchard.They might want some bees for pollination.Just an idea it is where i found a place for an out yard.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Round Top, New York - Northern Catskill Mtns.
    Posts
    1,895

    Post

    You could try the County Ag Extension or see if you can find a listing of local farm stands, etc and start there.

  5. #5
    BILLY BOB Guest

    Post

    I've found that stopping and asking if you can put bees on someones properity gets you ether one of two answers.

    1. *@%# NO!

    or

    2. Where have you been! You meen I get free honey for this! Bring all the hives you want.

    Running a add like Michael said or asking friends is a good way also. Just keep looking and be picky about that location. Don't jump at whatever comes first.

    BB

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Bartonville, TX USA
    Posts
    456

    Post

    Ask at the local feed and seed farm stores. They might let you put up a blackboard notice. I little honey might sweeten the deal for them. I find my local ramshackel, next to the railroad track seed warehouse a good source of local gossip about who's growing clover, alfalfa, etc.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Mobile, Alabama
    Posts
    536

    Post

    Another idea: Find any "pick your own" vegetable/fruit farms and ask if they want some free pollination. I like the idea of an ad or homemade pamphlets at your local feed/seed store. Once you have a location, pump the landowner for more contacts that he/she may know.

    You also need to start working on changing that ordinance in your municipality. "No bees" is a ridiculous, ignorant, and regressive stance for any municipality, county, parish, or state to take. Champion your cause and educate some people along the way!

    ------------------
    Rob Koss

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,427

    Post

    >You also need to start working on changing that ordinance in your municipality. "No bees" is a ridiculous, ignorant, and regressive stance for any municipality, county, parish, or state to take. Champion your cause and educate some people along the way!

    I'm sure the bees don't know about the ordinace and are living somewhere in someones eave or a hollow tree or a cooler in the back yard anyway.

    I can see a restriction on the number of hives, but not an outright ban.


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Mobile, Alabama
    Posts
    536

    Post

    Agreed.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    >You also need to start working on changing that ordinance in your municipality. "No bees" is a ridiculous, ignorant, and regressive stance for any municipality, county, parish, or state to take. Champion your cause and educate some people along the way!


    The reason I see for cities to enforce a no bees ordnance is two fold.

    1. Some people really are alergic to bees, the rest think they are, and they, (the bees), are a health risk.

    2. It is expensive to have a colony of bees removed from your home or building. You are less likely to have to remove and make repairs if there are less bees in your area.

    I have bees in my back yard, I shouldn't, but I do. I hear that you can get a really good yield in town, I'd like to find out.

    I bet a neighbor could make a good case for me to make repairs to their home if one of 'my' swarms landed there and 'caused' damage.

    There are risks to everything, just another way to get stung.

    Cautious in Cowtown

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,427

    Post

    I kept bees in town off and on for decades. I had them in Mitchell, NE and Omaha, NE. When I had them in Laramie, WY and Brighton, CO I was in a housing development with little acrages, but there were still a lot of people and houses around. They did well in town. I think it's all those people watering their flowers all year long and timing them to bloom all year long.

  12. #12
    mmundy Guest

    Post

    DLee knows that I have hives in my backyard. I looked for an ordinance on-line and found nothing that said no bees in Liberty. He, on the other hand, called city hall and talked to the desk clerk who got a word-of-mouth response from coworkers that bees aren't allowed. I personally think if its not in writing, its not a law, its just prejudice or fear, both of which come from ignorance.

    When I told my neighbors I kept bees out by the highway last year, they all said, "Why not keep them here? They would help our gardens." I have cool neighbors. I have talked to all of them who can see my yard from theirs and they were all supportive. So I had two hives in my backyard this year. How convenient for me! Also convenient was the process of educating my visitors not to be afraid of bees. My bees are so nice, you can pet them!

    I like the in-town honey and find that the bees fill the supers very fast, even this year with the drought. My neighbors know that when they eat my honey, they can enjoy a sense of ownership in it, since their gardens and flower beds nourished my bees.

    I suggest anyone who wants to keep bees in his yard visit with their neighbors for approval and leave local government out of it! Don't brag to everyone you meet about your hive. Those that know will admire your courage and come to you for advice.

    For people who worry about getting stung, remind them that they don't seem too worried about chiggers, ticks and mosquitos when they are outside all summer long. I've surely gotten several dozen of their bites and stings this year and only one bee sting and that because I was being stupid!

    See my bee-yard pictures here: http://www.geocities.com/libertybees/Mundy.html

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    Bravo!

    I bet it would be a lot harder to repeal ours than to instigate a new one like this.

    For now I will have to ask forgivness rather than permission. My neighbor is deathly afraid of the little girls.

    Bill

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Liberty, MO USA
    Posts
    57

    Post

    When researching the "Bee-ban" in town I spoke with a City Planner who read me the ordinance over the phone. It's an existing law even though it's not on the city's website. I even know one of the planners and I spoke with him regarding the issue.

    Not sure why this came about probably goes back to the ignorance thing or else someone's little angel got stung snooping around in someone's backyard.

  15. #15
    BILLY BOB Guest

    Post

    As far as keeping bees in the city and worring about one of your swarms getting into somone's home check your state laws. In Ga once the swarm has left the hive it no longer belongs to the beekeeper, and he can't be held acountable.

    BB

  16. #16
    mmundy Guest

    Post

    Unfortunately for me, I'm somewhat of a fraidy-cat and fear that proposing an ammendment to the city would raise suspicion and win me a visit to my backyard from the city manager. Maybe dlee and I could propose this thing from his address?

    Have any of you ever been fined before?

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,427

    Post

    >Have any of you ever been fined before?

    I've never been fined or otherwise bothered by any officials.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Mobile, Alabama
    Posts
    536

    Post

    I think that Martin Luther King said, on the subject of civil disobedience, that an unjust law is no law at all. Yes, going against the grain can be unpleasant, and could cause those unhappy with your position to investigate your back yard. As Coyote said, if you are right and have the information and support you need to make your point, you will prevail. aren't we all thankful that so many were willing to be civilly disobedient in the late 1700's....

    ------------------
    Rob Koss

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