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  1. #1
    dcromwel Guest

    Question

    Actually, it was beneath the sbb on the slide-in board I had placed there for winterizing. There were several other dead versions as well. This critter was alive. Looked like it would make good bait. Have a look.
    http://home.comcast.net/~pmcc/wsb/ht...ome.html-.html

    Click on the picture and slide to the middle for a colse-up. What is it?

    Thanks,

    David in Baltimore

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,217

    Post

    It makes excellent bait. Looks like a wax moth larvae, but I don't have any size comparison. Next time put a dime next to it and crop the picture. I have dialup and it took about 30 minutes to dowload the picture.

    Wax moth larvae vary in color from white to fairly dark depending on how mature they are and what they've been eating.

    Small Hive beetle larvae have spines on them.

  3. #3
    BILLY BOB Guest

    Post

    I have to agree with Michael. Looks like wax moth larva. SHB larva are much smaller than wax moth larva, almost magot like.

    BB

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,217

    Post

    Maybe I should also point out that it's normal to find these on the SBB or in any debris pile. If you find them in the combs, the hive isn't very strong.

  5. #5
    dcromwel Guest

    Post

    Thanks, Michael and Billy Bob. Sorry about the file size. Total rookie here on that kind of thing. Also forgot to give you any size info in addition to an in-photo scale. The critter was about 3/4 inch long.

    Did my first complete open hive inspection yesterday. Looks like a very strong hive to me. One comment and one question: I think Michael might be right about not feeding syrup...there was sugar water thrown all over the place in a way that suggested to me reducing the queen's egglaying space. Should I rotate the boxes if most of the capped brood was in the upper box but the queen was in the lower box?

    Thanks,

    David in Baltimore

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,217

    Post

    >Thanks, Michael and Billy Bob. Sorry about the file size. Total rookie here on that kind of thing.

    I understand. It just took forever to download.

    >Also forgot to give you any size info in addition to an in-photo scale. The critter was about 3/4 inch long.

    That would be a wax moth larvae.

    >Did my first complete open hive inspection yesterday. Looks like a very strong hive to me.

    Wax moth larvae on the SBB is not a sign of a problem. It's just normal.

    >One comment and one question: I think Michael might be right about not feeding syrup...there was sugar water thrown all over the place in a way that suggested to me reducing the queen's egglaying space.

    Only two reasons to feed in the spring.

    1. The bees are low on stores.
    2. To stimulate brood rearing if it has not commences.

    If they are rearing brood and they have plenty of stores, IMO feeding causes more problems than it's worth.

    >Should I rotate the boxes if most of the capped brood was in the upper box but the queen was in the lower box?

    I hardly ever rotate unless I've got an EMPTY box on the bottom and I rotate it back up to the top. The purpose some have for rotating is keeping the queen in the bottom. Their other purpose is to disrupt the brood nest so the bees are in too much of a turmoil to swarm. I'm not that fond of reversing for EITHER of these. I just try to keep them from having an empty box abondoned on the bottom.

    Your queen is in the bottom. Isn't that where you want her? Unless the box is full of CAPPED honey I wouldn't worry too much. Do the bees have room to store nectar coming in? Does the queen have room to lay somewhere? If you think she doesn't because of capped honey, you can uncap some of it at the edges of the brood nest or add some drawn comb or even bare foundation at the edge of the brood nest.


  7. #7
    jfischer Guest

    Post

    Any wax moth larvae "tossed out" of the
    combs in spring are a good sign of a
    strong and robust hive.

    The only good wax moth is a dead one.

    A wax moth below the Screened bottom
    board indicates that the trash board
    needs to be cleaned more often. You
    don't want to be breeding the things
    right under a hive, now do you?


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