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Thread: How will I know

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Belleville, Illinois, U.S.A.
    Posts
    77

    Lightbulb

    Yesterday we had a terrible storm and the wind was so great it blew over one of my hives. The hive had 4 supers on it with two deep brood chambers. Without waiting a week and going through the hive to see if there are fresh eggs or not how can I tell if she still exist? Do you think they will produce a new queen if she was killed.

    I know, to go through it now would be a mess with all the nectar they have stored so far, but what choice do I have?

    I never would have a thought this would ever happen. All that happen to the hives next to the one the blew over was it blew the tops off and they only had 2 supers on them. Go figure!

    Tony

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Bismarck, ND USA
    Posts
    521

    Post

    I doubt that this would kill the queen. I would simply set the hive back up and leave it be. If by some chance she was killed, they should raise a new one. This is what I would do (with around 400 hives), if you have the time you could certainly tear into it to make sure she is OK.

    ------------------
    Gregg Stewart

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Round Top, New York - Northern Catskill Mtns.
    Posts
    1,895

    Post

    Most likely the queen is fine. I have had hives blown over too many times to count and have yet to lose a queen. But, if you did, they will raise their own. If you wanted you could go back into the hive in (4) days and look for eggs. Then you will know.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,492

    Post

    >Yesterday we had a terrible storm and the wind was so great it blew over one of my hives.

    Been there.

    >Without waiting a week and going through the hive to see if there are fresh eggs or not how can I tell if she still exist?

    If you want, you can look and if you find her she does still exist. But if you don't? You'll have to wait three or four days and look for eggs and queen cells. If you find queen cells, she's dead or they decided the disaster was her fault and will replace here.

    >Do you think they will produce a new queen if she was killed.

    The will absolutely try and they will almost always succeed.

    >I know, to go through it now would be a mess with all the nectar they have stored so far, but what choice do I have?

    You can just leave them alone. Either the queen is dead and they will raise a new one or she isn't and she will keep laying. If she's gone you'll probably actually get a better honey crop right now with less brood to care for while they raise the new one and you get requeened.

    >I never would have a thought this would ever happen. All that happen to the hives next to the one the blew over was it blew the tops off and they only had 2 supers on them. Go figure!

    The taller they get the more likely it is to happen. One of the reasons I like to NOT prop them up so high off the ground. The lower they start the lower the top is and the less likely to blow over. Also a windbreak is nice so they don't get so much of the wind. I also have better luck with concrete blocks on top to hold everything down. But I sure hate lifting them that high.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,492

    Post

    Another reason for a horizontal hive. They don't blow over and the covers hardly ever blow off.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Carnation, WA, USA
    Posts
    120

    Post

    Last winter I drove in a couple metal fence posts alongside each of my hives. It was to prevent deer from bumping them over but it also would have helped against strong wind. I've since fenced around the hives and removed the fence posts.

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