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Thread: Wintering Nucs

  1. #121
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    St. Albans, Vermont
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    5,477

    Default Re: Wintering Nucs

    Yes, foundation...as long as there is a good enough flow. Otherwise I give them comb.

  2. #122

    Default Re: Wintering Nucs

    Friends,

    Can you help me about extra multiple mating nuc made by A Komissar.I'm interested about drawings.
    Thanks

  3. #123
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    Dec 2006
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    St. Albans, Vermont
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    Default Re: Wintering Nucs

    I use all 3/4 pine that I buy cheap from the mill.

  4. #124
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    St. Albans, Vermont
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    Default Re: Wintering Nucs

    Quote Originally Posted by drone1952 View Post
    Friends,

    Can you help me about extra multiple mating nuc made by A Komissar.I'm interested about drawings.
    Thanks
    Do you have a link?

  5. #125
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    loveland, co, usa
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    120

    Default Re: Wintering Nucs

    So forgive me if this sounds stupid, but i have to ask since i don't have bees yet.

    If i accept that i wont have a honey harvest the first year, is there any benefit to hiving my nucs that i get in april. Would it not be smarter, since i plan to expand in the coming years, to just keep them in 5 frame nucs, and make as many nucs as i can the first year. Since you've said that you can have up to 10:1, would it not be smart the first year to keep splitting the nucs the first year, and since im starting with 2 nucs, have anywhere between 5-20 nucs going into winter.

    It seems to me that that would be the smarter way, if for no other reason than covering winter losses, then yr 2 could be half of them hived, and the other half resplit for nucs.

  6. #126
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Northern Virginia
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    764

    Default Re: Wintering Nucs

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Palmer View Post
    Do you have a link?
    Try this
    http://www.wiltshirebeekeepers.org.u...ril%202007.pdf
    karla

  7. #127
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Blacksburg, VA
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    447

    Default Re: Wintering Nucs

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Palmer View Post
    How much are the later made nucs requiring as far as feed goes? How many gallons of 2:1? Quantity/cost in relation to how much the nucleus colonies are worth?
    You got me there. I should go back and add up everything spent on sugar before mid Sept or so. I was feeding 1:1 once a week until the first of Sept when I went over to 2:1. I use single frame division board feeders. The 1:1 seemed to just disappear except for a few nucs that were more adept at putting it away. Some of the least thrifty ones were Italian queens that were brooding like crazy, but using all the feed up doing so.

    The queens I got from you did a better job than most putting away the feed.

  8. #128
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Great Falls Montana
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    Default Re: Wintering Nucs

    Dynasty my friend, the bees are indeed capable under optimum conditions of being split that radically if properly managed. I am not trying to burst your bubble, but are you sure you are going to have the expertize out of the starting blocks to manage this feat? You might flame out and split your two nucs to death and end up with nothing. If you read a lot and listen to the right people here, I would almost bet you can double to four or five total units that you could get thru the next winter. But I really doubt twenty! Now Mr Palmer or Mr. Bush can do that regularly I am sure, but it takes some experience to gt to that place. Good luck. Passion to push hard is a good thing. But don't let everyone convince you that you can't get a first year honey crop. WIth good conditions unsplit, you probably could if you have a good location.

  9. #129
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    Northern Virginia
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    764

    Default Re: Wintering Nucs

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Palmer View Post
    How much are the later made nucs requiring as far as feed goes? How many gallons of 2:1? Quantity/cost in relation to how much the nucleus colonies are worth?
    Jim Haskell has a presentation on "nucenomics" for the mid Atlantic area comparing SPring made vs. overwintered nucs. It is only one year old so still pretty current. He figures overwintered nucs vary in cost from $20 to $50 to make and feed with much of the variable cost dependent on the cost of queen purchase or using your own home reared. Sounds about right. Labor is another factor entirely of course, and for most hobbiests/backyard beeks, not sure we ever really factor that in. Thanks to MP's ideas, I have found that using 2 stories help a lot in reducing time needed for management- less need to remove brood in summer, more food stores for winter, and a little more time before they burst at the seems come Spring. Next Spring I will experiement with a few- using some as cell builders and splitting some to rear their own.
    karla

  10. #130
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
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    loveland, co, usa
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    Default Re: Wintering Nucs

    Quote Originally Posted by Vance G View Post
    Dynasty my friend, the bees are indeed capable under optimum conditions of being split that radically if properly managed. I am not trying to burst your bubble, but are you sure you are going to have the expertize out of the starting blocks to manage this feat? You might flame out and split your two nucs to death and end up with nothing. If you read a lot and listen to the right people here, I would almost bet you can double to four or five total units that you could get thru the next winter. But I really doubt twenty!
    Well i wasn't actually thinking 20 lol, more of a hypothetical really. But what i am more curious about is the ability to increase. More than likely what i will end up doing is 2 hives for the whole year so i can get the feel of how things should do, then experiment the 2nd year, or hope for picking up a swarm from one of the 2 feral hives ive located and do the experimenting then. But of course i don't expect to have 20 hives by the end of my first season

    Of course since its my first year i know i will be wanting to be in the hives more than i should be. And i keep reading how nucs need to be managed more, so Nuc managing sounds like it would be good for a beginner who wants to spend a lot of time with the bees. And since theres still 5+ months till i can start, i'll continue thinking of what ifs until then.

  11. #131
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    Blacksburg, VA
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    Default Re: Wintering Nucs

    Quote Originally Posted by Dynasty View Post
    Of course since its my first year i know i will be wanting to be in the hives more than i should be. And i keep reading how nucs need to be managed more, so Nuc managing sounds like it would be good for a beginner who wants to spend a lot of time with the bees. And since theres still 5+ months till i can start, i'll continue thinking of what ifs until then.
    I think you are right about this. The bees might not need you to be in them all the time, but you will learn volumes by inspecting and watching what they are doing. And yes the nucs are easy to go in and usually have less defenders bugging you.

  12. #132
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    jackson county, alabama, usa
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    Default Re: Wintering Nucs

    if there is a local bee club in your area, i bet that you would find folks willing to guide your efforts to start new hives, catch swarms, and make nucs.

  13. #133
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Rome NY USA
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    104

    Default Re: Wintering Nucs

    Mike thanks for that info, can't wait to start in the spring and start using your methods. ps I belong to Mid NY Beekeeping club how do we get in touch with you to come and give a presintation. if you could email me on beescource or jmora325@yahoo.com

  14. #134
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Stokesdale, North Carolina
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    Default Re: Wintering Nucs

    I live in central nc near greensboro. I only have one hive now its in one ten fram deep and one shallow supper fulll of honey. I was wondering if I can split them in the spring before they fill the second deep and still get honey? What about the lumber i use, Will nucs overwinte in 15/32 ply wood here. Thanks for the help

  15. #135
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Lebanon, Maine
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    103

    Default Re: Wintering Nucs

    Question on moving an overwintered nuc into 10 frame equipment. Currently have a 5 deep frame nuc, configured as 5 over 5, with top five having been filled with honey. Intention is to move to 10 deep in the spring. But, due to temperature, I think I'm going to need to super the Nuc before the move. If I go with something similar to Mike's methodology, I should be supering before dandelion flow (maple) and reversing on dandelion flow. Should I plan to super, perhaps another deep (5x5x5) and then at reversal time move them to 10 frame equipment? I'm thinking it might still be too cold at dandelion flow. Or perhaps wait for a nice warm day, and then do it? Thanks
    Chip Harlow

  16. #136
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    Default Re: Wintering Nucs

    Your bees are more resiliant than you give them credit for. In Maine, you can transfer the nuc into a 10 frame setup at the end of April or the first week of May...as long as the nuc isn't weak. That's well before your dandelion bloom or flow. As far as reversing goes...a nuc colony like this won't need to be reversed the first year. The task is accomplished by adding the second brood box of combs. If only foundation is available, bait the center of the second brood box with empty combs or a couple combs of brood from below.

  17. #137
    Lauri Guest

    Default Re: Wintering Nucs

    I have read only a few pages of this thread so far, but it is very informative. Thank you all for posting your experiences and ideas.
    As a new beekeeper last year, I was already interested in overwintering nucs for the sole ability to have locally raised fall mated queens available in my Northern climate for spring increases and loss replacement.
    Seems like if you are NOT overwintering nucs, you will be buying bees every year.
    No reason to throw good money away when you can educate yourself to manage them correctly in the first place.
    Lauri
    http://www.itsmysite.com/laurimilleragricultural/

  18. #138
    Lauri Guest

    Default Re: Wintering Nucs

    You may be intersted in a few of my 'combo' hives. I made this one as a queen mating nuc combo, but some of the dividers can be removed for overwinteing nucs larger or converted to overwinter 3-ten frame hive combos. All second story box's are seperate for easy inspections of each colony. This is just a prototype and a few alterations are planned for the next one. A heavier insulating 1 1/2" bottom box with 3/8 tempered hardboard dividers for sharing warmth. Lots of ways this combo can be used.


    here's a slide show with all the assembled parts:

    http://s425.photobucket.com/albums/p...ter=slideshows





    Heres a photo of my heating cable bench my overwintering stock is kept. It is thermostatically controlled and only comes on when needed. My intent is to maintain the small clusters ability to move onto feed if I have very cold temps for extended periods of time. It has not stimulated brood rearing-at least not yet when the days are short.



    I burned and sealed this body with my propane torch Spar urethane and am just waiting for my Nuc Disk reducers from Canada to arrive. When it is complete I will post aother photo.
    My next combo box will lay out to accomodate 8 nuc box's as a second stack.
    I really never lift the bottom box and as long as I am careful about it's initial placement, I think this will work well for me.
    Here the color of this cedar decking material after burning and sealing. I was playing around with some PVC fittings for entrance control, as you see in this photo. Just drill a few holes in the plug for queen excluder and keep one solid for total confinement.


    I am just a new hobby keeper with about 20 hives. Surley different from the beekeeper trying to make a living and needs volume over pretty.

  19. #139
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
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    2,667

    Default Re: Wintering Nucs

    Lauri,

    A couple of suggestions on your prototype.
    1) try to avoid groves in the wood for interior surfaces. These can serve as a safe haven for small hive beetle (SHB).
    2) extend your hardboard dividers about 3/4 inch above so that you can individual tops over each nuc space. That way you can open only the nuc you want to work, also some virgin queens can be very frisky and if multiple nucs are open then problems can happen. Of course you will need a weather tight outer cover to keep the dividers dry.

  20. #140
    Lauri Guest

    Default Re: Wintering Nucs

    Here's a few more pics of my mating nuc combo hive shown above. Had to make the edges of the masonite tight to the box so no bees can slip by. I had some cedar that fit just right and made a 1/4" channel along the bottom-similar to the grove on a top bar frame-and glued the masonite into the grove. If I had a 3/16 bit it would have been better 1/4" grove was a pinch too big. But now that I toped the masonite, only two frames will fit. But that is OK for mating nucs. I offset my foundation so the small cluster of bees won't get trapped on one side of that giant frame. You can also see I made my mini nuc frames. Just cut down the big frame tops and bottoms, trimmed up one end to fit the side bars and mini frames for half the price.
    It was funny, making these frames reminded me of making baby clothes! It's been 25 years since I did that!
    Now I plan to put these frames in established hives to get at least somewhat drawn out before using them in mating nucs. Heck, I might insert the black foundation into the broodnest of queens I want to graft from, do my grafting, put the remaining black foundation frame in a starting colony horizontally by laying this frame on top with a spacer-enticing them to build the queen cells in a more vertical form. Then when they are done with that, use them in the mating nucs as drawn out frames. LOL too many choices.







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