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  1. #1
    Dzug Guest

    Arrow

    I was inspecting my hives today. I've always wondered about all the pictures with bees and mites on them. So, I was looking closely for mites and I finally saw a bee with one on her back walk by. I didn't see any others.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, United States
    Posts
    397

    Post

    Hi
    I was inspecting my hives today. I've always wondered about all the pictures with bees and mites on them. So, I was looking closely for mites and I finally saw a bee with one on her back walk by. I didn't see any others.

    reply:
    Good you have seen your first mite. Now just keep your head and watch close and plan what to do to control them and yet not hurt your bees.

    Now the question you will have to face is:
    How do you personally wish to control them? With or without chemicals.

    Either way you go you will find plenty of information, but the end choice is yours.

    I myself would suggest biological ways without treatments and just small cell foundation and field management, though more labor intensive.

    Chow:

    Dee A. Lusby

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Birmingham, West Midlands, UK
    Posts
    751

    Post

    I think Dee's on the right lines, but you'll need to treat until you can get biological controlestablished. If you use apistan or coumaphos you'll end up with contaminated wax and possibly some unfortunate side-effects so if you can, it would be better to try FGMO or essential oils, which are still poisons, but at least they're non-persitent. Whatever you do, monitor mite infestations and be ready to do an emergency treatment if necessary; a lot of colonies are being lost these days, and I suspect most of it goes back to uncontrolled mite infestations.

    ------------------
    Regards,

    Robert Brenchley

    RSBrenchley@aol.com
    Birmingham UK

  4. #4
    Dzug Guest

    Post

    Well, the 4.9 foundation is truely interesting to me. I would like to be chemical-free. What I was wondering is, is whether or not standard sized foundation can continue to be used for the honey supers. If I do a shake down, I am essentially removing all the brood and foundation left in the hive. The hive will have to start completely over, correct?

    This is primarilly for the treatment of Varroa mites. Does it have any effect on tracheal mites?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Birmingham, West Midlands, UK
    Posts
    751

    Post

    That's right, the hive is starting over with just the adult bees, as though it was a swarm. I made a mistake and left the old broodbox elevated on the same hive to hatch out, and the bees all moved straight back into it abandonging the queen. Give it to another hive.

    ------------------
    Regards,

    Robert Brenchley

    RSBrenchley@aol.com
    Birmingham UK

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