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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    Seattle, Washington State
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    4,398

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    I feel wierd asking this question since I am a chef! [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Anyone have a pollen patty recipe?
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Langley, B.C. Canada
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    413

    Post

    Here's the recipe I use:

    3 parts Soy Bean flour
    2 parts Brewers Yeast
    Mix 2 parts sugar to 1 part water to make a syrup.
    Mix dry ingredients with syrup mixture until it is a doughy consistancy. Shape into patties between 2 sheets of wax paper , or make a loaf, chill it and slice it, placing slices between wax sheets. Approx. 500grms per patty.

    Terry

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,903

    Post

    I don't. I just put pollen or pollen mixed with substitute in an empty nuc dry. That they tear up. When I gave them patties they always wasted most are all of it. If they aren't interested in the dry open pollen, then there isn't a dearth of pollen.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
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    4,398

    Post

    where can you get dryed pollen from?
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,903

    Post

    Many suppliers sell pollen. Draper, Betterbee, Brushy Mt. It's expensive, but they usually have a cheaper, less clean version that works fine for feeding bees.

    If you get a pollen trap you can save some for next year.

    Keep pollen in the freezer. It needs to be fresh.

    If I have to buy pollen, I usually buy some pollen substitute or soy flour and mix it half and half. Straight substitute just isn't nutritious enough, but straight pollen can get very expensive.

    In studites, brood raised on just substitute has been shown to be inferior, not living as long. Kind of a waste of all the work for the bees to get a worker that doesn't live very long.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Post

    I've never had good results with the pollen
    substitutes, and I've tried them all.

    Real pollen, even dried-out pollen you buy
    from the major vendors "gets the bees going"
    much better.

    Buy a pollen trap, or buy pollen from
    someone who traps pollen. You'll be much
    happier.

    For early feeding, like one would do this
    month in Virginia, I just mix it with enough
    2:1 sugar syrup or HFCS to create a mix that
    can hold a shape.

    I don't bother with the wax paper. I put
    a blob into a zip-lock bag, and before sealing,
    I squish a group of the patties with a half-sheet
    baking tray. Then I stack 'em the the freezer,
    where they will keep for months.

    I do my mixing in a Electrolux Assistant DLX
    mixer, a real beast of a machine that can handle
    22 cups of dry mixture plus liquid at a go.
    While this is potential grounds for divorce in
    most states, my wife does not mind the mixing of
    "food for the bees", as it does not make a mess.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Langley, B.C. Canada
    Posts
    413

    Post

    Isaac
    If you use pollen traps,collect after 3 days max
    Prevents mould
    Prevents larvae from starving
    Freeze immediately
    When frozen,sort out debris
    1 tsp/day keeps doctor away

    Terry

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Post

    Anyone know of anywhere to buy cheap pollen? It is expensive!
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    1,649

    Post

    >...collect after 3 days max
    ...Prevents larvae from starving...

    What am I missing here? How does collecting pollen prevent starvation?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Langley, B.C. Canada
    Posts
    413

    Post

    Sorry, My wording wasnt the best. I mean to say that if you collect pollen for more than 3 days, there is a chance that there won't be enough pollen left to feed the larvae. Maybe I should also clarify, that "Prevents Mould" means, if left for more than 3 days the chances are that the collected pollen will turn mouldy.

    Terry

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    waco, tx
    Posts
    528

    Post

    Terry

    Ok another question from a novice; saying I move the trap from one hive to another after 3 days, how long before I can safely move it back to the original hive? I'm hoping to end up with 4 hives this year; if I'm lucky in a year or 2 maybe I can top out at 8.

    Lew

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Langley, B.C. Canada
    Posts
    413

    Post

    Lew,

    For each brood box, you should have 2 to 3 frames of pollen. So check your hives for pollen before you put the trap back.

    Terry

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    waco, tx
    Posts
    528

    Post

    Thanks Terry

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    san antonio.texas USA
    Posts
    488

    Post

    To make patties, I use a 5 gal bucket with a paint mixer and a drill. Mix honey and water or 1/1 syrup with subsitute pollen till you get soft peanut butter. Spread peanut butter on top bars. Freeze leftovers. I have had better success and its less work with dry feed as described by MB. I enjoy watching the goast bees flying around (bee covered in subsitute pollen). Even though you are North of me, I bet dry feed would work best for you. Once you have a decent natural pollen source, the bees are reluctant take subsitute. Agarita pollen starts for me around 2nd or 3rd week of February.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Jenison, MI
    Posts
    1,514

    Post

    Feeding purchased pollen produced by an unknown source...

    I assume that isn't as dangerous as feeding honey from an unknown source which is recommended against?

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Post

    > Feeding purchased pollen produced by an unknown
    > source...
    > I assume that isn't as dangerous as feeding honey
    > from an unknown source which is recommended
    > against?

    Not really... think about it - the bee gathers
    pollen, and the pollen is knocked off the bee
    before it gets back into the hive. Hard to
    imagine this being a way to spread AFB, or any
    other bee disease.

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