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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Pilot Hill, Northern CA.
    Posts
    776

    Post

    Hi Folks,

    Checked my hive today and noticed there was lots of capped brood but didn't see any new eggs nor larva. I'm wondering if, since the nectar flow is diminishing now, the queen might be regulating her egg laying rate as a result. I didn't see any supercedure cells to indicate the population is worried about the lack of eggs. Any thoughts?

    thx.
    Once you see the bandwagon, it's too late.
    www.goldfinch-acres.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,525

    Post

    How old is she? Where's Pilot Hill? Is your nectar flow diminishing? Is She II?

    Hawk
    KC0YXI

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,183

    Post

    As Hawk said and....... What race is she? Put some feed on if you are unsure of nectar flow.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Hotlanta, GA
    Posts
    475

    Post

    Did you find your queen?
    Ask two beekeepers, get three answers

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Pilot Hill, Northern CA.
    Posts
    776

    Post

    The queen is young. I just hived these bees in April. That's why I would be surprised if there was a problem with her.

    Pilot Hill is in Northern CA. Near Sacramento.

    These are Italian bees.

    I hate to feed too early in case they are still gathering fair amounts of nectar so that I don't compromise the honey content.

    It sounds like I need to spend more time in the hive and search for her. And if I do find her, make an assessment as to whether she is doing her job or not.

    Early lesson learned: buy a marked queen next time.

    If I bought a new queen and placed her cage in the hive and the old queen was still there, would the two of them battle it out or would the workers just ball whichever queen they didn't like?

    I realize this is not an exact science.

    Thanks for your help.
    Once you see the bandwagon, it's too late.
    www.goldfinch-acres.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Hotlanta, GA
    Posts
    475

    Post

    The workers would ball the new introduced queen as they're loyal to the existing queen as long as her pheromone is still present in the hive.

    Yes, marked queens are a delight [img]smile.gif[/img]

    And if you can't seem to find the queen and there are no eggs or larvae present, then ockham's razor would dictate that somehow the queen died or was injured(probably squished by accident between frames during manipulations). There may be a reason they couldn't build emergency cells or you may have a virgin running around that hasn't mated yet. I'd do a thorough search for a/the queen, and if you can't find her, I would order a new one pronto.
    Ask two beekeepers, get three answers

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,082

    Post

    I recently had a problem of a similar nature, and spent hours looking for the queen, and couldn't find her. So I combined with a nuc that had a marked queen in it, which was killed within a day. So I broke the hive into three nucs, and gave the two that I thought the queen wasn't in, queen cells. The one that I thought the old queen was in, didn't get one, and one of the ones that did get a queen cell, tore it down. Anyway I can only surmise that the queen in the orginal hive quit laying or was a virgin. Because that hive now has lots of eggs and capped brood.

    peggjam
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
    Posts
    1,966

    Post

    >>>>>The queen is young. I just hived these bees in April. That's why I would be surprised if there was a problem with her. <<<<<<

    Don't bet the ranch on this. I'll bet a third of my young queens bit the dust this year. 25 hives. The test of giving them a frame of ypoung brood to see if they make queen cells hasn't worked well with me either. 2 days ago I had a hive with a lot of swarm cells and made a split with them, thinking I'd let them make a queen. I went back today to find that I accidently left the queen in with them. The cells were untouched. I expected her to open them but she didn't. Sometimes the bees don't read the **** book!

    Dickm

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,492

    Post

    I might expect a cut back on brood rearing when there is less nectar or, sometimes, even in the middle of a flow because there are enough bees, but you always find SOME eggs pretty much until fall unless there is a really serious dearth.

    I'd go looking more for the queen AND eggs.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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