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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    New Braunfels, TX
    Posts
    463

    Question

    I read Michael's post on fallacies and it pointed out yet another of my shortcomings. I do not know the difference between a supercedure queen cell and a swarm queen cell. The post seemed to indicate that there was a distinct difference. How can I tell the difference, if, indeed, there is one?

    Ron S.
    Hobbyist

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,080

    Post

    Are you referring to physical or use difference? The supercedure cell is to replace a failing queen. The swarm cell is made when the queen is strong, but the hive wants to multiply.

    The physical difference we will leave to someone else to explain.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    New Braunfels, TX
    Posts
    463

    Post

    Michael's post under Beekeeping Fallacies indicates that may be two distinct physical differences. I understand the definitional differences; I do not understand how to look at a frame with these cells and tell if I have a supercedure queen cell, or a swarm queen cell.

    Ron S.
    Hobbyist

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,080

    Post

    There are indications as to which are which, but just remember bees are not constant and will doublecross you in a second. Now, supercedure cells are normally on the top half of the frame and swarm cells are on the bottom half.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,849

    Post

    Supercedure cells are usuall located within the comb on the frame, where as swarm cells are usually located along the bottom of the frames, and in the dozens. Supercedure cells are usually in numbers of only a few.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,925

    Post

    As Ian said,

    Supercedure: In supercedure the bees are trying to replace a queen they perceive as failing. She is probably 2 to 3 years old and not laying as many fertile eggs and not making as much Queen Madibular Pheromone (QMP). These cells are usually on the face of the comb about 2/3 of the way up the comb.

    Swarming: Swarm cells are built to facilitate the reproduction of the superorganism. ItÂ’s how the colony starts new colonies. The swarm cells are usually on the bottom of the frames making up the brood nest. They are usually easy to find by tipping up the brood chamber and examining the bottom of the frames.

    And as Ian also said, the swarm cells are usually more numerous.

    The third kind are emergency cells and they seem to be more scattered and less predictable in location and number. They are because the queen was killed or lost somehow.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,074

    Post

    "The third kind are emergency cells and they seem to be more scattered and less predictable in location and number. They are because the queen was killed or lost somehow."

    Random because the bees build them where ever they find larva the right age to make a queen. Which when a queen fails she lays less eggs in a random pattern. These queens are usually infeior to those of the other two types, and are a last resort for the bees to make a queen.
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,849

    Post

    >>These queens are usually infeior to those of the other two types, and are a last resort for the bees to make a queen.


    I dont think so, they are taken from freshly hatched larvae, just the same as the larve grafted for rearing, and in just the same hive situation as a colony when left queenless to accept cells.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

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