Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    kalamazoo, mi
    Posts
    113

    Post

    does anyone else feel awful after inspecting thier hives because of the bees that get crushed? the supers are so heavy now it's all i can do to get them on and off, making sure bees arent getting squished between is just out of the question for me now. also, even moving frames about; it seems i always manage to kill or maim some and i feel terrible about it. i always think "is the queen getting squashed in there?" as i'm manipulating things around. i think you learn alot more by getting in there but sometimes i wonder if i shouldnt just leave them alone except to add supers as necessary. anyone else?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Post

    You know, I feel the same. I feel bad when I crush a bee or shall I say bees.

    I think that at the beggining, it is most likely that you will not always focus on not crushing the bees but rather focus on technique of going into the hive. I think through experiance, you will find that you will brush the bees way.


    Thats my two cents on it...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,329

    Post

    Between gentleness and just technique you get better as you go along, but sometimes there is no avoiding a stubborn bee that won't get out of the way. I try to slide things into place instead of setting them in place. I try to gentle set them im place instead of dropping them in place. It all helps. But in the end, yes, a few don't get out of the way. If you've given them lots of opportunities and warnings by setting it slowly, sliding it etc, then think of them as the "not so smart" bees.

  4. #4
    kookaburra Guest

    Post

    Well, after thinking "did I squish the queen" and then finding out that I REALLY DID SQUISH THE QUEEN!!! i am now careful and try to keep out.

    As to squishing a few bees...as long as it is only one or two on top of a box, I try to avoid it but if I can't I don't let it bother me.

    I agree with your last statement. But you have to learn somehow, right? Learn from mistakes.

    -rick

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    Does anyone use smoke to clear the top of the frames before returning boxes on top of each other? There will always be one or two, but with smoke and the proper technique, bee squishing should really be minimal.

    Bees in mass on top of the boxes usually mean that there is alot of burr comb and probably honey that has been exposed. Do you scrap this burr comb? And is your equipment of proper size to eliminate an ongoing problem in the future?

    As for frame squish bee kill, there is perhaps a better way to minimize bee death. I'm not sure your management style, but unless your frame and comb is way out of whack, there might be better way. Do you start on the edge and work inside? Does your comb contain alot of drone at the bottom, preventing pulling the frames up without damage? Do you insist on "seeing" the queen everytime when it is not advantageous when seeing eggs/brood is sufficient? Do you wear gloves that keeps you from slowing down and using good management technique? Point - If you were forced to not wear gloves, it is amazing how carefull you become, how bees are not squished any longer, and how calm the bees are if smoked and worked properly.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Arnold, MD USA
    Posts
    48

    Post

    When replacing a frame, I have found it better to slide it against the previous frame already in the hive. That prevents squishing them when frames are pushed back together.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    kalamazoo, mi
    Posts
    113

    Post

    boy, i'm glad you all share my feelings. i like the darwinian idea of thinking a little natural selection is going on in regard to bees who wont move! i am very careful with the bees. i smoke them back down into their frames before i set the new super on. i dont even bother to look for the queen. if i see a good pattern of capped worker brood i congratulate them all on thier harmony and get on out of there. i'm sure you are right, dan, about no gloves. i'm afraid though if i get stung i'll drop the frame without thinking. i'm working up to that. thanks everybody. sarah.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

    Post

    Takes me absolutely forever to slide the last frame back in. They walk around in between the side slats and I have to slip a stick or something down in between these slats to make them move over so I can squeeze the frame tight together.

    If I had to wear a full bee suit with gloves and veil....... Well my eyes would be burning with the sweat pouring in.

    I don't know how they do it....

  9. #9
    rwjedi Guest

    Post

    Actually you are not getting any natural selection unless you are killing Queens or drones. The workers don't affect the genetics of the future generations.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    kalamazoo, mi
    Posts
    113

    Post

    good point

  11. #11
    Hi Sarah
    I would suggest you might think of going to a 8 frame hive there a little lighter and lot of women are going to the 5 frame nuc with standard deep frames with 2-3 med supers on it.
    I have been useing 8 frame hives for over 30 yrs now makes more then 10 fram hives and easyer no your back too.
    Don

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    kalamazoo, mi
    Posts
    113

    Post

    don, do you use a standard deep hive body and just remove two frames? do you give them back two extra frames to get them through winter or do you leave a super on? i like the idea of removing a frame or two to make things easier to manipulate in there but i worry that they will need all the stores they can to get them through the long winter.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Boynton Beach, Florida, USA
    Posts
    278

    Post

    Hi Sarah,

    You might be happier with different equipment. A hive made of meduims instead of deeps could relieve some of the problem. But a long hive might even be a better solution.

    There are lots of aspects to beekeeping that can cause moral anxiety. And its not just limited to the bee themselves but also to bee pests. It must be the same in most agriculter, especially those areas involving animal husbandry.

    Regards
    Dennis
    Regards
    Dennis

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,795

    Post

    I never inspect when the supers are full. Pull the crop and you will have less boxes to manipulate. If the hive is full of squishable bees why inspect anyway ? I follow leave alone beekeeping with the best of results. Fogging doesn't require manipulations of the supers, placing strips or pattys only requires removing the top.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Lincolnton, NC, USA
    Posts
    71

    Post

    That is why I always have my smoker and a bee brush handy, especially when the supers are full. I, like Michael, slide the woodenware into and out of position. Helps a lot. I also don't go into the hives unless I have something that needs done or something specific I want to look at. I used to go in because it was so interesting and when you begin, it is a learning process. I too, hate to kill a bee, but it's going to happen.

  16. #16
    dtwilliamson Guest

    Post

    Maybe I'm just cold and emotionless, but I don't spend a great deal of time worrying about it. I try to be as careful as I can but it's impossible to avoid the ocassional squashed bee. The view I take is that a few die in order for the whole to benefit. (That's the goal anyway provided I don't screw it up...)

    Bees aren't people and I would suspect that probably at least a couple hundred or more die everyday anyhow... But I'm still careful.

    Dan

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads